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One of that select band of British pianists to achieve international recognition, Bernard Roberts was in constant demand as a recitalist, chamber musician, accompanist, concerto soloist and teacher. He was acclaimed by audiences and critics, the remarkable breadth of his industry bringing greater recognition for the instrument itself and proving pivotal in inspiring generations of aspiring performers.

Over-eighties group at the Royal Court: Lindy Henny, Patrick Adams, Dedwydd Jones

The theatre where it’s never too late to get in on the act

The Royal Court has turned out a raft of bright young writers – now it’s launching a workshop for eightysomethings. Alice Jones sits in

Album review: Zomby, With Love (4AD)

A 33-track double-album follow-up to Dedication, Zomby's 2011 breakthrough, With Love is aesthetically suspended between the indulgent and austere poles of the last two decades of electronic music, with the jittery programmed sequences, drum'n'bass stutters and breakbeats haunted by melancholy synth ambiences evocative of urban alienation.

Album review: Kodaline, In a Perfect World (B-Unique)

An Irish quartet with sights clearly set on the world's stadiums, Kodaline offer a musical barometer of bankable current rock trends, but display scant originality on this debut album.

Album review: Sigur Rós, Kveikur (XL)

Kveikur finds Sigur Rós in more forceful and declamatory mood than usual, a shift heralded by the explosion that ushers in the heavy guitar riff and juddering bass of “Brennisteinn”.

German pianist Klavier Kunst (L) performs with an unidentified activist at Taksim Square in Istanbul, Turkey

Turkey protests: The 'peace pianist' trying to bring calm to Taksim Square

The soothing sound of a grand piano drifted across Taksim Square last night, bringing a welcome calm a day after violence rocked the area.

Album: Michael Janisch, Jazz for Babies (Whirlwind/Cadiz)

Appalled by the synthetic-sounding CDs available, bassist and new dad Michael Janisch decided to create his own: a now five-disc selection of "slow and relaxing" jazz lullabies performed on real instruments by real musicians to soothe and educate wombers to pre-schoolers.

Album review: Tamsin Waley-Cohen, Huw Watkins, An American In Paris (Champs Hill)

This debut programme from the gifted young violinist Tamsin Waley-Cohen is themed around Euro-American musical interaction of the inter-war years, when classical composition was becoming influenced by black American idioms.

Album review: These New Puritans, Field Of Reeds (Infectious)

This third offering from These New Puritans is distinctly uneasy listening. Poised on the cusp of indie and classical, there is a laborious, tortuous formality about songs such as “Fragment Two” and “V”, with their peculiar, jerky time-signatures and lowering orchestrations.

Album review: Queens Of The Stone Age, ...Like Clockwork (Matador)

Since 2007's Era Vulgaris, Josh Homme has undergone both life-threatening medical emergency and life-affirming parenthood, band break-up and superstar collaboration, all of which made recording this follow-up rather fraught – hence the ironic title.

Album review: KT Tunstall, Invisible Empire//Crescent Moon (Virgin)

KT Tunstall's fourth album is by some distance her best, offering a series of deeply-felt musings on mortality, mercy and memory. Recorded at Howe Gelb's Wavelab Studio in Arizona in two sessions separated by a season – hence the different titles for the separate “sides” – it reflects her response to the death of her father, the first side's sensitive, reactions gradually supplanted by a new emotional light as her branches become strong enough to “play with the wind” and “carry the snow” again.

Elton John played on the Queens of the Stone Age's new record

Sir Elton John revelling in Queens of the Stone Age rock collaboration

Sir Elton John has spoken of his excitement at playing on a rock record for the first time - as his collaboration with Queens Of The Stone Age hurtles to the top of the charts.

Classical review: Steven Osborne, Queen Elizabeth Hall/ Richard Goode, Wigmore hall, London

For Olivier Messiaen, birds were ‘the most outstanding musicians on our planet’, and it was typical of his serene imperviousness to brute reality that, while Paris burned around him in 1944, he should garland the themes of his supreme piano work with birdsong.

Album: Thundercat, Apocalypse (Brainfeeder)

When it comes to jazzy soul that sounds like the future more than the past, bassist/vocalist Thundercat (aka Stephen Bruner) and co-producer Flying Lotus have it nailed.

Album: Various artists, The Beautiful Old (Doubloon)

A fascinating collection of songs from the 19th and early 20th centuries – the era before commercial recording, when a song stood or fell by its performance as domestic sheet music.

Smart moves: Romain Duris and Déborah François in 'Populaire'
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Day In a Page

Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
Lake Maggiore, Orta and the Matterhorn – seven nights from £899pp
Sicily – seven nights from £939pp
Pompeii, Capri and the Bay of Naples - seven nights from £799pp
Istanbul Ephesus & Troy – six nights from £859pp
Mary Rose – two nights from £319pp
Middle East crisis: We know all too much about the cruelty of Isis – but all too little about who they are

We know all too much about the cruelty of Isis – but all too little about who they are

Now Obama has seen the next US reporter to be threatened with beheading, will he blink, asks Robert Fisk
Neanderthals lived alongside humans for centuries, latest study shows

Final resting place of our Neanderthal neighbours revealed

Bones dated to 40,000 years ago show species may have died out in Belgium species co-existed
Scottish independence: The new Scots who hold fate of the UK in their hands

The new Scots who hold fate of the UK in their hands

Scotland’s immigrants are as passionate about the future of their adopted nation as anyone else
Britain's ugliest buildings: Which monstrosities should be nominated for the Dead Prize?

Blight club: Britain's ugliest buildings

Following the architect Cameron Sinclair's introduction of the Dead Prize, an award for ugly buildings, John Rentoul reflects on some of the biggest blots on the UK landscape
eBay's enduring appeal: Online auction site is still the UK's most popular e-commerce retailer

eBay's enduring appeal

The online auction site is still the UK's most popular e-commerce site
Culture Minister Ed Vaizey: ‘lack of ethnic minority and black faces on TV is weird’

'Lack of ethnic minority and black faces on TV is weird'

Culture Minister Ed Vaizey calls for immediate action to address the problem
Artist Olafur Eliasson's latest large-scale works are inspired by the paintings of JMW Turner

Magic circles: Artist Olafur Eliasson

Eliasson's works will go alongside a new exhibition of JMW Turner at Tate Britain. He tells Jay Merrick why the paintings of his hero are ripe for reinvention
Josephine Dickinson: 'A cochlear implant helped me to discover a new world of sound'

Josephine Dickinson: 'How I discovered a new world of sound'

After going deaf as a child, musician and poet Josephine Dickinson made do with a hearing aid for five decades. Then she had a cochlear implant - and everything changed
Greggs Google fail: Was the bakery's response to its logo mishap a stroke of marketing genius?

Greggs gives lesson in crisis management

After a mishap with their logo, high street staple Greggs went viral this week. But, as Simon Usborne discovers, their social media response was anything but half baked
Matthew McConaughey has been singing the praises of bumbags (shame he doesn't know how to wear one)

Matthew McConaughey sings the praises of bumbags

Shame he doesn't know how to wear one. Harriet Walker explains the dos and don'ts of fanny packs
7 best quadcopters and drones

Flying fun: 7 best quadcopters and drones

From state of the art devices with stabilised cameras to mini gadgets that can soar around the home, we take some flying objects for a spin
Joey Barton: ‘I’ve been guilty of getting a bit irate’

Joey Barton: ‘I’ve been guilty of getting a bit irate’

The midfielder returned to the Premier League after two years last weekend. The controversial character had much to discuss after his first game back
Andy Murray: I quit while I’m ahead too often

Andy Murray: I quit while I’m ahead too often

British No 1 knows his consistency as well as his fitness needs working on as he prepares for the US Open after a ‘very, very up and down’ year
Ferguson: In the heartlands of America, a descent into madness

A descent into madness in America's heartlands

David Usborne arrived in Ferguson, Missouri to be greeted by a scene more redolent of Gaza and Afghanistan
BBC’s filming of raid at Sir Cliff’s home ‘may be result of corruption’

BBC faces corruption allegation over its Sir Cliff police raid coverage

Reporter’s relationship with police under scrutiny as DG is summoned by MPs to explain extensive live broadcast of swoop on singer’s home