Life and Style Only 3.4 per cent of the Solihull area is covered by housing

It isn’t hard to find an architect who will tell you that vast swathes of the British urban landscape are ugly, grey and unappealing – nor would you struggle to find people who agreed with them. But could it be that the look and the layout of our cities is actually bad for our health?

Architecture: The architectural legacy of Stephen Lawrence

The search is on for the winner of the James Stirling prize and a new award in memory of Stephen Lawrence is announced. By Nonie Niesewand

Property: Why a bad job can give you a shock

Having faith in your workmen is all well and good, but sometimes it is misplaced, as Clare and Audrey found to their horror. Penny Jackson finds out why

Architecture: Triumph of the pod people

In the autumn, Future Systems' 'techno-organic' media centre goes up at Lord's cricket ground. Before then, you can see their curious work at the ICA.

LAW REPORT: Unregistered architect could not use `FRIBA'

19 march 1998: Jones v Hellard; Queen's Bench Divisional Court (Lord Justice Pill and Mr Justice Gage) 6 March 1998

Oil change for the British living room

Excuse me while I slip into something more uncomfortable - an intense spatial experience, in fact

Letter: Price of Green Belt

Sir: There is no doubt that the development of "brown land", including underused or empty property, should be encouraged ("How to save the green grass of home", 14 January). It not only reduces encroachment into the Green Belts, but enables the existing urban infrastructure to be used to its maximum potential, avoiding the costs of new schools, roads, clinics and so on.

Letter: On the road

Sir: Nigel Seymer and Carlton Reid (Letters, 10 January) take me to task over my suggestion (8 January) that vehicles capable of zero emissions will reduce congestion. The reasoning is that when such vehicles are on stream it will be feasible for towns and cities to exclude all but zero-emission vehicles from their centres. This could happen now, but with city centres in a fight to the finish with out-of-town megacentres, a zero-emissions policy could be a step too far.

People: London rains on Caprice's parade

Picture the scene. Two likely lads are planning an audacious robbery at the Cartier workshop on New Bond Street (and speaking in dodgy Cockney accents purely for comic effect).

Architecture: National Architecture Week begins today...

An Arts Council and Royal British Institute of Architects initiative, of over 150 events, will take place around the country.

Architecture: The smartest walk-in cupboard in Paris

A tiny apartment which uses new technology to utilise small spaces has been shortlisted for a major prize. Nonie Niesewand explores the revolutionary rooftop

Letter: Green buildings

ir: Whilst I subscribe to the diagnosis of our environmental problems outlined by Charles Secrett (letter, 11 October) I feel he is being hard on a government which has hardly had a chance to penetrate the inner workings of the mind of "Sir Humphrey." We should not underestimate the scale of the commitment by Tony Blair to cut emissions of carbon dioxide by 20 per cent against 1990 levels by 2010.

Architecture: How the need for a dining room becomes a triumph for the spirit of enlightenment

Here are three projects to lift the spirits, particularly spirits trapped in the houses they already occupy: a glass dining room, an extension that takes a house's inside outside and, perhaps most pleasing of all, an idea that turns a bland basement window into a work of art. Not simply a matter of let there be light; also let there be excitement. Nonie Niesewand talks to the architects on site.

The pick of British architecture now

Stirling prize

Will Norman Foster and Anthony Caro cross the Thames in a blaze of glory?

The Millennium Bridge, from St Paul's to the Tate at Bankside, would be a wondrous sight and a wondrous walk. It would also be the first Norman Foster work to have a dramatic presence in London.

The house that Jack built. And Jill, and Fred, and...

...anyone else who wants to avoid the profiteering developers and their mock-Georgian estates. Felicity Cannell on the pleasures of self- build
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