Voices Goggle box: the blocky looks of the Oculus Rift belie the breath-taking experience of what the wearer sees

This technology is about to change the way you perceive the world – and yourself

Dispatches from the theatre of war

What did Hair have to offer besieged Sarajevo? More than Waiting for Godot, perhaps. The playwright David Edgar reflects on the drama of conflict

ART / Speaking a different language altogether

Impressionism in Britain - Barbican, London

Bowery dies

Leigh Bowery, the muse and model of the artist Lucian Freud, died suddenly aged 33 on New Year's Eve.

Books: Best of both worlds

EAST, WEST by Salman Rushdie

Saving Graces

THE sculpture The Three Graces will stay in Britain after Baron Heinrich Thyssen- Bornemisza donated pounds 800,000.

Letter: God from the critical realist's perspective

Sir: David Boulton of the Sea of Faith network (letter, 6 August) is right in saying that it is not new to think of God, not as an eternal transcendent reality, but as a projection of our human ideals. The classic statement was that of Ludwig Feuerbach in the early 19th century, and the Rev Don Cupitt has been saying essentially the same for the past 14 years with the tolerant acquiescence of the Anglican Church - so that it now seems rather inconsistent of the Church to come down so heavily on the more vulnerable Rev Anthony Freeman.

CENTREFOLD / Through the keyhole darkly: Sivan Lewin exhibition walks the line between voyeurism and violation

Sivan Lewin's large-format colour photographs survey the private space of the home from the perspective of an intruder-voyeur. Comfortable interiors shot from the darkness of the street evoke the urban menace of the unseen threat, and the paranoia of surveillance-obsessed home-owners. We cannot be sure whether her subjects are potential victims of crime, targets of obsessive desire, or simply the random objects of idle curiosity.

BOOKS / Classic Thoughts: A joy stripped naked: Natasha Walter on Vladimir Nabokov's late great novel, Ada, which was published 25 years ago this month

EVERY WRITER is a slightly different beast to each of his or her readers, but many of Nabokov's critics seem to dress him up in a wolf's suit that makes him quite different from the lamb that I know. And nowhere is that more true than with Ada, his last major work. A fantasy novel full of wit and artifice, it was seen by one critic as 'a political allegory offset by linguistic legerdemain'. But what can be taken for a clever folly rides on its supreme simplicity: it is no more and no less than the greatest love story ever told.

Russia's realist goes home: Solzhenitsyn returns to Moscow on Friday and could once again influence the country that rejected him, says Vladimir Chuguev

TWENTY years ago Alexander Solzhenitsyn arrived in Frankfurt on a Soviet plane - handcuffed and accompanied by KGB thugs. The Soviet authorities thought this was the best way of getting rid of him. Deprived of his country, its people and its language, he would fade into obscurity.

BOOK REVIEW / Children's Books: Happy families and rare pigs: Maureen Owen on the best books for children

FOR ALL that the choice is so wide, show an adult a pile of books for seven- to 12- year-olds and they are likely to choose the ones fondly remembered from their youth. Who hasn't longed to recapture the magic world of fantasy which Ursula Le Guin once described as 'A vast and beautiful national park'? From the time their children are about seven years old, parents would do well to look out for new books. By the lavishly gifted William Mayne, for instance, who started writing for children in 1953 and is still producing some of the best books to be found. His latest, Hob and the Goblins (Dorling Kindersley pounds 8.99) about a house spirit who tidies away things like scraps of quarrels and pieces of spite before moving on to the sterner stuff of evil magic, is perfect for a good eight- or nine-year- old reader. While Low Tide, also by Mayne (Red Fox, pounds 3.50), is an exhilarating adventure story set in New Zealand at the turn of the century.

PRODUCTION NOTES / The set of The Kitchen: Mark Thompson, the designer who ripped out 140 seats at the Royal Court

'Stephen Daldry (director) was very keen to make the production of The Kitchen an event. He is renowned for big theatrical ideas - theatre with a big 'T' - and he came to me and said 'Will you do The Kitchen? I've got an idea that I'd like to push it out over the stalls and involve the theatre.' So the idea of putting scaffolding over the stalls came early on and was the crux of the whole design.

Contemporary Art Market: Photographic images show deceptive realism

THIS WEEK two of London's leading avant-garde galleries are showcasing photography, now considered as significant a medium for artistic expression as painting and sculpture.

Letter: Deceptive images

Sir: There is a poster campaign in London that depicts three middle- class men who are responsible for knocking their wives into casualty (Living, 11 February). The message is that assault is a crime, whoever you are.

BOOK REVIEW / Paperbacks: Before and After - Rosellen Brown: Sceptre, pounds 5.99

Mom's a doctor, Dad's a sculptor, the local police chief is their friend - none of which, it seems, stops young Jacob bludgeoning a teenage girl to death. Not classic courtroom drama, but something as gripping and more profound: a study of the middle-class nuclear family stretched to breaking point. Brown is an avid student of the ethics of crisis, and her realism in this disturbing novel makes your eyes water.
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Day In a Page

Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
Lake Maggiore, Orta and the Matterhorn – seven nights from £899pp
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Robert Fisk: All this talk of an ‘apocalyptic’ threat is simply childish

Chuck Hagel and Martin Dempsey were pure Hollywood. They only needed Tom Cruise
Mafia Dons: is the Camorra in control of the Granite City?

Mafia Dons: is the Camorra in control of the Granite City?

So claims an EU report which points to the Italian Mob’s alleged grip on everything from public works to property
Emmys look set to overhaul the Oscars as Hollywood’s prize draw

Emmys look set to overhaul the Oscars as Hollywood’s prize draw

Once the poor relation, the awards show now has the top stars and boasts the best drama
What happens to African migrants once they land in Italy during the summer?

What happens to migrants once they land in Italy?

Memphis Barker follows their trail through southern Europe
French connection: After 1,300 years, there’s a bridge to Mont Saint-Michel

French connection: After 1,300 years, there’s a bridge to Mont Saint-Michel

The ugly causeway is being dismantled, an elegant connection erected in its place. So everyone’s happy, right?
Frank Mugisha: Uganda's most outspoken gay rights activist on changing people's attitudes, coming out, and the threat of being attacked

Frank Mugisha: 'Coming out was a gradual process '

Uganda's most outspoken gay rights activist on changing people's attitudes, coming out, and the threat of being attacked
Radio 1 to hire 'YouTube-famous' vloggers to broadcast online

Radio 1’s new top ten

The ‘vloggers’ signed up to find twentysomething audience
David Abraham: Big ideas for the small screen

David Abraham: Big ideas for the small screen

A blistering attack on US influence on British television has lifted the savvy head of Channel 4 out of the shadows
Florence Knight's perfect picnic: Make the most of summer's last Bank Holiday weekend

Florence Knight's perfect picnic

Polpetto's head chef shares her favourite recipes from Iced Earl Grey tea to baked peaches, mascarpone & brown sugar meringues...
Horst P Horst: The fashion photography genius who inspired Madonna comes to the V&A

Horst P Horst comes to the V&A

The London's museum has delved into its archives to stage a far-reaching retrospective celebrating the photographer's six decades of creativity
Mark Hix recipes: Try our chef's summery soups for a real seasonal refresher

Mark Hix's summery soups

Soup isn’t just about comforting broths and steaming hot bowls...
Tim Sherwood column: 'It started as a three-horse race but turned into the Grand National'

Tim Sherwood column

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Eden Hazard: Young, gifted... not yet perfect

Eden Hazard: Young, gifted... not yet perfect

Eden Hazard admits he is still below the level of Ronaldo and Messi but, after a breakthrough season, is ready to thrill Chelsea’s fans
Tim Howard: I’m an old dog. I don’t get too excited

Tim Howard: I’m an old dog. I don’t get too excited

The Everton and US goalkeeper was such a star at the World Cup that the President phoned to congratulate him... not that he knows what the fuss is all about
Match of the Day at 50: Show reminds us that even the most revered BBC institution may have a finite lifespan – thanks to the opposition

Tom Peck on Match of the Day at 50

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