Voices

Much as we should be disgusted by their crimes, locking people up for a century will not make our country a safer place

Horses head back to the stable after training in preparation for the Breeders' Cup at Santa Anita, California

Carla Gaines: From bad blood to thoroughbreds

The trainer quit counselling, after witnessing too much inhumanity, to find redemption with horses. Chris McGrath hears her story

Fright night: New York gears up for Halloween, but fears are all in the mind

The Halloween poisoner has US in his grip

A new study casts doubt on an urban legend, but the myth of the deadly candy refuses to die

Archbishop warns of 'majoritarian tyranny' in elected House of Lords

The Archbishop of Canterbury has spoken out against the House of Lords becoming an entirely elected chamber.

Black people in Britain more likely to be unemployed than those in US

Black people in Britain suffer from higher unemployment than those in the US because of a failure to address social inequality in the labour market, according to new research.

Joan Smith: It's modern masculinity that's in trouble

Two-fifths of lap dancers say that customers are rude or abusive towards them

Soldiers and policemen check a passenger in a Toulouse subway station

If Toulouse killer is not a neo-nazi, then who is he?

Criminologist: 'It is as if he is telling us that we should get ready for the worst, that he is capable of anything'

Professor John Rex: Noted scholar of race relations

Professor John Rex was a leading figure in British sociology, chairing departments at various universities and founding two, at Durham and Warwick. A leading scholar in the field of race or ethnic relations in the UK, he participated in comparative and collaborative studies on the topic in Europe and elsewhere and was well-known internationally for his work in this area, and as a theorist of social conflict.

Sarah Sands: Loudmouths and braggarts have had their day

A former boss once recommended to me hiring a young man he had met at dinner. My heart sank because I knew this man to be bumptious and not that bright. My boss assured me that I was mistaken. The youth was bold, visionary and going places. "Is that what you thought?" I sighed. "No, that is what he told me," he replied.

Terence Blacker: Solitude is the school of genius

It is the time of the year when the great divide between the salaried and the self-employed is at its widest. For one group, there will be the usual pay-slip at the end of the month, while the other faces that painful moment of reckoning which is the tax deadline. And it is not just the employed's financial security which seems enviable, but the suspicion that they have a jollier time than we freelancers down at the end of Lonely Street: the chats they call "meetings", desk-to-desk flirting, those "team-building" weekends.

Far from falling behind, mature postgraduates tend to be more focused

Real late starter: age is no obstacle if you're motivated

Mature students often worry that they're too old to make the grade, but their zeal and dedication can give them an edge over their younger peers

Leading article: There ought not to be a question over gay marriage

Gay marriage simply ought not to be a matter of political controversy in a civilised society in the 21st century.

Criminology

The glass ceiling smashers

A look at some of the most influential women on the world stage - female figures who have turned the tides and made history

Sociology degree students to study 'The Wire'

It inspires devotion in its fans, is hailed as addictive viewing - and now television drama The Wire is to become the subject of a British university course.

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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine
Letterman's final Late Show: Laughter, but no tears, as David takes his bow after 33 years

Laughter, but no tears, as Letterman takes his bow after 33 years

Veteran talkshow host steps down to plaudits from four presidents
Ivor Novello Awards 2015: Hozier wins with anti-Catholic song 'Take Me To Church' as John Whittingdale leads praise for Black Sabbath

Hozier's 'blasphemous' song takes Novello award

Singer joins Ed Sheeran and Clean Bandit in celebration of the best in British and Irish music
Tequila gold rush: The spirit has gone from a cheap shot to a multi-billion pound product

Join the tequila gold rush

The spirit has gone from a cheap shot to a multi-billion pound product
12 best statement wallpapers

12 best statement wallpapers

Make an impact and transform a room with a conversation-starting pattern
Paul Scholes column: Does David De Gea really want to leave Manchester United to fight it out for the No 1 spot at Real Madrid?

Paul Scholes column

Does David De Gea really want to leave Manchester United to fight it out for the No 1 spot at Real Madrid?