Arts and Entertainment

Sheryl Crow "Feels Like Home" (Warner Bros)

Write and wrong: Authors Julia Crouch and Stella Duffy, left, find common ground

Let me get this straight ... or not: Stella Duffy and Julia Crouch on sexual identity

The novelists Stella Duffy (who is gay) and Julia Crouch (who is not) discuss issues of identity and authenticity that can arise when your lead character is a lesbian – and why authors should simply ignore them all

Stereophonics, Graffiti on the Train (Stylus)

Album review: Stereophonics, Graffiti on the Train (Stylus)

Keep Calm and Carry On from 2009 found Stereophonics struggling to find a decisive way forward, and while Graffiti on the Train is a significant improvement, it's still something of a patchwork affair, lurching between string-laced pieces like the elegaic title track and “Indian Summer”, soulful blues odes such as “Been Caught Cheating” and “No-one's Perfect”, and out-and-out rockers like the swaggering “Catacomb”.

Hollywood: Variety's daily edition gets ankled

Famous film trade mag Variety is adapting for the web by killing off its daily print edition in favour of a once-a-week edition and removing its online paywall. In its honour here are some of its best inside-Hollywood lexicographical inventions (dubbed slanguage):

British group: Mumford & Sons

Brit Awards 2013: No wild things from a music scene in the wilderness of mediocrity

Emeli Sandé, happily, doesn't look like an identikit winner, but she does sound an awful lot like Adele

Barrie Edgar claimed to have been 'the world's worst actor'

Barrie Edgar: Television producer who worked on 'Come Dancing' and 'Gardeners' World'

In a television career spent entirely with the BBC, Barrie Edgar demonstrated a parallel loyalty to his home area of Birmingham. Specialising in outside broadcasts and bearing the title TV Producer, Midland Region, he established his reputation in the single-channel era of the 1950s, continuing as the city's production centre became Pebble Mill in the early 1970s. While his credits were as disparate as children's programmes, variety shows and the 1962 consecration of Coventry Cathedral, he also made programmes that reflected his own interests; as a keen horticulturist, he produced BBC2's Gardeners' World, one of several shows that survive him, in varying formats.

Album review: Various Artists, Reason to Believe: the Songs of Tim Hardin (Full Time Hobby)

Just as he was, by all accounts, an unpleasant man blessed with enviably beautiful gifts, so do Tim Hardin's songs clothe often unwelcome sentiments in gorgeous melodies.

Album review: Buddy Miller & Jim Lauderdale, Buddy and Jim (New West)

Buddy Miller is fast becoming a ubiquitous presence on quality Americana and, through work with the likes of Robert Plant and Richard Thompson, quality Albiona, too.

IoS album review: Jools Holland & his Rhythm & Blues Orchestra, The Golden Age of Song (Rhino)

This collection of collaborative covers trawls Holland's Hootenanny shows, with a dozen specially recorded tunes thrown in.

Taylor Swift, pictured, will play the legendary Joni Mitchell

Why does today's pop music sound the same? Because the same people make it

Experimentation is being pushed to the margins as labels rely on successful producers

IoS paperback review: The Man Who Sold the World, By Peter Doggett

Just as the Beatles' musical revolution summed up the spirit of the Sixties, so, Peter Doggett argues, David Bowie was "popular culture's most reliable guide to the fever of the Seventies".

Frank Ocean’s coming out was a watershed moment for hip-hop and homosexuality

New gay club nights bring hip-hop out of the dark, into the bright lights

Hip-hop has a difficult relationship with gay culture – could a raft of new club nights fix that? Lemma Shehadi reports

The Rochdale Cowboy bows out with guns blazing

The sacking of BBC folk radio DJ Mike Harding is a sad end for one of broadcasting's most tireless characters

After all this time, it's still good to Talk Talk

A book and CD show how influential the band remain, says Pierre Perrone

Green Day

Prolific pop: Should you really release three CDs in four months?

Pop music is going through a prolific period. Elisa Bray reports

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Orthorexia nervosa: How becoming obsessed with healthy eating can lead to malnutrition

Orthorexia nervosa

How becoming obsessed with healthy eating can lead to malnutrition
Lady Chatterley is not obscene, says TV director

Lady Chatterley’s Lover

Director Jed Mercurio on why DH Lawrence's novel 'is not an obscene story'
Farmers in tropical forests are training ants to kill off bigger pests

Set a pest to catch a pest

Farmers in tropical forests are training ants to kill off bigger pests
Mexico: A culture that celebrates darkness as an essential part of life

The dark side of Mexico

A culture that celebrates darkness as an essential part of life
Being sexually assaulted was not your fault, Chrissie Hynde. Don't tell other victims it was theirs

Being sexually assaulted was not your fault, Chrissie Hynde

Please don't tell other victims it was theirs
A nap a day could save your life - and here's why

A nap a day could save your life

A midday nap is 'associated with reduced blood pressure'
If men are so obsessed by sex, why do they clam up when confronted with the grisly realities?

If men are so obsessed by sex...

...why do they clam up when confronted with the grisly realities?
The comedy titans of Avalon on their attempt to save BBC3

Jon Thoday and Richard Allen-Turner

The comedy titans of Avalon on their attempt to save BBC3
The bathing machine is back... but with a difference

Rolling in the deep

The bathing machine is back but with a difference
Part-privatised tests, new age limits, driverless cars: Tories plot motoring revolution

Conservatives plot a motoring revolution

Draft report reveals biggest reform to regulations since driving test introduced in 1935
The Silk Roads that trace civilisation: Long before the West rose to power, Asian pathways were connecting peoples and places

The Silk Roads that trace civilisation

Long before the West rose to power, Asian pathways were connecting peoples and places
House of Lords: Outcry as donors, fixers and MPs caught up in expenses scandal are ennobled

The honours that shame Britain

Outcry as donors, fixers and MPs caught up in expenses scandal are ennobled
When it comes to street harassment, we need to talk about race

'When it comes to street harassment, we need to talk about race'

Why are black men living the stereotypes and why are we letting them get away with it?
International Tap Festival: Forget Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers - this dancing is improvised, spontaneous and rhythmic

International Tap Festival comes to the UK

Forget Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers - this dancing is improvised, spontaneous and rhythmic
War with Isis: Is Turkey's buffer zone in Syria a matter of self-defence – or just anti-Kurd?

Turkey's buffer zone in Syria: self-defence – or just anti-Kurd?

Ankara accused of exacerbating racial division by allowing Turkmen minority to cross the border