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A bitter row over the existing skatepark has forced the centre to delay its £120m overhaul

GOING OUT: TICKET OFFER: REALM OF THE SENSES

William Orbit's N-Gram label houses an eclectic collection of musicians and In the Realm of the Senses offers a night with four of its artists: Strange Cargo, singer and cellist Caroline Lavelle, Torch Song and The Electric Chamber. Taking place at the Queen Elizabeth Hall on 20 July, the concert will include celtic-influenced songs and new interpretations of the work of well-known 20th-century composers.

Classical review:EMERSON QUARTET Queen Elizabeth Hall, London

Food, drink and the flavoursome strains of an amplified Budapest Cafe Orchestra set the scene for Sunday's QEH "Experience Day" where the Emerson Quartet triumphantly surveyed all of Bartok's six string quartets. OK, the goulash might have seemed decidedly "boil-in-a-bag" and the music more reminiscent of bar mitzvahs than Bartok (Monti's Csardas isn't exactly fresh from the plains,) but the atmosphere was highly congenial.

LETTER :Military-style modern buildings

From Mr Graham Whettam

Now you see them, now you don't

Some of the 101 chairs that started off as Habitat Van Gogh models and were customised by 101 designers, including Sir Terence Conran, John Richmond, Workers for Freedom, Viscount Linley and Andrew Logan. They will all be on display at the Queen Elizabeth Hall on the South Bank from 3 to 12 August.

Music: Pumping up the volume: Nick Kimberley reviews Glenn Branca at the Queen Elizabeth Hall and Michael Nyman at the Barbican Hall

The words 'technology' and 'music' sometimes seem antithetical, the one inhuman, the other redemptively human. Yet it is technology that, historically, has made music possible, whether supplanting the fortepiano with the extended sonorities of the pianoforte, for example; or offering up the awesome possibilities of the full-blown symphony orchestra. One of technology's happiest gifts has been extra volume, yet in our own time, few composers have exploited the most obvious means of cranking up the volume: amplification.

MUSIC / Of old and new: Robert Maycock on the Docklands Sinfonietta at the Queen Elizabeth Hall

It looked like a dream concert - sensuous Polish songs surrounded by easy-going French music and some lightweight Haydn - and the foyer was crowded.

Letter: Reasons to protect the South Bank

Sir: Jonathan Glancey comments on the declared intention of The South Bank Board to demolish The Hayward Gallery, Queen Elizabeth Hall and Purcell Room (24 February). It is to be hoped that the board will think again, for reasons both particular and general.

Hayward Gallery saved in 15m pounds plan

PLANS to demolish the Hayward Gallery on London's South Bank, widely regarded as a Sixties concrete eyesore, have been abandoned. In an extradordinary turn- round, following a confidential memo to the heads of the board responsible for managing the South Bank arts complex, the board is instead to demand that the Government spend up to pounds 15m 'as an immediate priority' to improve the complex.

MUSIC / Heartfelt prayers, drab fairy-tales: LP / Welser-Most - Royal Festival Hall

A LATE programme change meant that the London Philharmonic's Tuesday contribution to the South Bank Schubert series began with what may have been his last completed work. Despite its title, Intende voci - 'Hearken to the voice of my cry' - is no anguished prayer in extremis. There is something of the calm eloquence of parts of his E flat Mass, with touches of high-calorie Schubertian rococo in its oboe and soprano solos.

MUSIC / Taking shape: Philharmonia - Royal Festival Hall

The sincerity of Tchaikovsky's music has never been doubted, but its inexorably symphonic logic has only been given its due in comparatively recent times. His innovative structural genius was always deemed inferior to his melodic and dramatic inspiration. One can understand how it happened: Tchaikovsky's violent contrasts of moods, tempo and material stood out so markedly that attention was initially distracted from the subtlety of thought and structure that encompassed them.

OPERA / Opera that fails to move: Fidelio - Royal Festival Hall

LIKE many a problematical masterpiece, Fidelio has had its critics. A few have found it too symphonic; Wagner on the other hand thought it wasn't symphonic enough. As far as I am aware, though, no one has ever suggested that it might be an oratorio. And yet there were moments in Tuesday's Royal Festival Hall concert performance, conducted by Andrew Litton, where the mood and manner came close. Most of the cast made some attempt at acting. As Leonore, however, Jane Eaglen deported herself as she might have done in church - or the recording studio: minimal movement, and with the score very much to hand.

MUSIC / Balanescu Quartet: Queen Elizabeth Hall, London

The Serious Speakout promotion people pulled their crossover following in for the Balanescus. Monday night, however, was a shambles, with two intervals a few minutes apart, offhand announcements of changes, and the wrecking of a new Gavin Bryars piece for recorded voice and string quartet. One short movement, then a long pause, and the regrets: it was, of course, the wrong kind of tape.

MUSIC / National Youth Wind Orchestra - Queen Elizabeth Hall, South Bank

Writing for a symphonic wind band means doing without the support of multi-purpose orchestral strings. The compositional alternatives, to judge from Friday's concert, include an idiom of contrapuntal severity, a little light music showing off the ensemble's more attractive instrumental colours, or something completely different: a one-off conception like Berlioz's monumental Grande Symphonie Funebre et Triomphale, heard in the second half.
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