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Londoner Sam Roberts has been obsessively documenting Britain's brick adverts for posterity and has set up a blog to document the signs

MI5 chief's address 'on IRA hit-list'

A LIST of military and civilian targets including the head of MI5, Stella Rimington, and Virginia Bottomley, the Secretary of State for Health, was found at the flat where two men accused of IRA terrorist offences were picked up, the Old Bailey was told yesterday.

Education: Saturday is the secret of their success: Stereotyped as under-achievers, black children are proving their worth at weekend schools, reports Brenda Houghton

On Saturday mornings, 11-year- old Chanel Bannister joins 80 other Afro-Caribbean children at a school in north-west London to study maths and English. All around the country thousands of black children are doing the same. At a score of sites around London, and in other cities with a sizeable black population such as Leeds and Birmingham, parents and teachers have come together to set up supplementary schools to combat the under-achievement of their children in state schools.

Inside Parliament: Home Office unmoved by hunger strikers: Most asylum seekers have no fear of persecution, Wardle insists - London Tory demands action against senders of racial hate mail

A Home Office minister insisted yesterday that he would not be 'blackmailed' by asylum seekers going on hunger strike. With the protest that has beset detention centres appearing to crumble, the Under-Secretary of State, Charles Wardle, told MPs that anyone who thought refusing food would lead to their release was sadly mistaken.

Street stabbing

Scotland Yard named a man stabbed to death in Stoke Newington, north-east London, as Trevor Monerville, 26, of Hackney, north-east London. He was found on the pavement by a passer-by. His mobile telephone and jacket were missing.

Lautro chiefs run gauntlet in Parliament: Suitability of Personal Investment Authority chairman is questioned

LAUTRO, the life insurance industry regulator, was yesterday accused of failing in its role and of paying only lip service to consumers as its chairman and chief executive were given a rough ride by MPs on the Treasury Select Committee.

Mentally ill PC 'at centre of police cell death'

A POLICE officer diagnosed as mentally ill and unable to give evidence in court, was described as the 'prime candidate for responsibility' and 'plainly at the centre' of a murder in a police cell, a jury at the Old Bailey was told yesterday.

Police could face criminal charges after drugs inquiry: Officers in north-east London alleged to have sold cocaine and planted evidence

UP TO 10 police officers have been recommended for criminal charges following a marathon investigation into allegations of drugs trafficking, planting evidence and perversion of justice by police at Stoke Newington in north-east London.

Slip sliding away: Slide aerobics comes from America and looks ridiculous. But, says Sarah Lewis, it's being hailed as the Next Big Thing in fitness training

Slide aerobics is being hailed as the Next Big Thing in fitness training. Imported from the US it has more than a touch of West Coast loopiness about it.

Letter: How to pay for the Tube

HOW can we pay for new public transport infrastructure? Cathy Aitchison points out ('Short-term funds go down the tube', Business, 9 January) that much of the benefit of the underground is 'captured away from the fare box' and that 'a hypothecated tax dedicated specifically to the Underground' could be introduced if ways were found of measuring such benefits.

Man began death fire over noisy neighbours

A MAN whose life was made hell by his noisy drug-dealing neighbours finally snapped and set fire to their home, killing a three-year-old boy, the Old Bailey was told yesterday.

The wrong side of the law: The people of Stoke Newington, in the London borough of Hackney - the poorest in England - have lost faith in their police. Allegations of fabricating evidence, gratuitous violence and drug-dealing have blurred the line between law-enforcers and law-breakers

STOKE NEWINGTON's pounds 9m police station is the most imposing building on the High Street. Built three years ago to replace a sombre structure with an equally sombre history, it has light-coloured brick and shatter-proof glass through which Hackney citizens may be observed in discourse with their uniformed protectors. From the wide pavement, the large windows and spacious interior contribute an impression of institutional openness, even friendliness, no more threatening than, say, a Tesco store or Telecom office.

You're not always better off in a Volvo

AFTER 15 minutes I thought, fine. The guy's probably been held up in the late-night traffic, I won't even mention it. After half an hour? Well. I spent a few minutes clockwatching. Thirty-five. Forty. Bloody three-quarters of an hour] And then . . . then I started to get niggled. I fussed around, thinking unfair things. I was at a party. It was after midnight. I thought: these days, you call a cab, you expect it to be late. Why? Why? Maybe the bloody thing won't turn up at all. I've had that happen, I thought. God, I was feeling bitter.

'IRA terrorist shot unarmed officer in back at spot check': Constable escaped death by ducking as gun was fired, jury told

AN UNARMED policeman was shot in the back by one of two IRA terrorists after the officer had made a spot check on their lorry containing three tons of high explosives, an Old Bailey jury was told yesterday.

State funding to help blacks 'return' urged: Labour MP criticised after addressing 'taboo' subject

BRITAIN'S ethnic minorities should be given the chance to return to their countries of origin with their path smoothed by government cash, Bernie Grant, the Labour MP for Tottenham, said yesterday.

MUSIC / Chas and Dave - those lost years in full: Many assumed it was all over for Charles Hodges and David Peacock. But, gor blimey, no. By Jasper Rees

THREE days after Christmas in 1943, a Mrs Hodges of Edmonton in war-torn north London gave birth to a boy. She could have complicated a big decision he was to make in later life by christening him Samuel, but she plumped instead for Charles. By the time the young Hodges formed a band with David Peacock more than a quarter of a century later, another duo called Sam and Dave had already made quite a name for themselves.
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Ben Little, right, is a Labour supporter while Jonathan Rogers supports the Green Party
general election 2015
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The 91st Hakone Ekiden Qualifier at Showa Kinen Park, Tokyo, 2014
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Life and Style
Former helicopter pilot Major Tim Peake will become the first UK astronaut in space for over 20 years
food + drinkNothing but the best for British astronaut as chef Heston Blumenthal cooks up his rations
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Kim Wilde began gardening in the 1990s when she moved to the countryside
peopleThe singer is leading an appeal for the charity Thrive, which uses the therapy of horticulture
Sport
Alexis Sanchez celebrates scoring a second for Arsenal against Reading
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Life and Style
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Voices
An easy-peel potato; Dave Hax has come up with an ingenious method in food preparation
voicesDave Hax's domestic tips are reminiscent of George Orwell's tea routine. The world might need revolution, but we like to sweat the small stuff, says DJ Taylor
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Japan's population is projected to fall dramatically in the next 50 years (Wikimedia)
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Life and Style
Buyers of secondhand cars are searching out shades last seen in cop show ‘The Sweeney’
motoringFlares and flounce are back on catwalks but a revival in ’70s car paintjobs was a stack-heeled step too far – until now
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Prices correct as of 17 April 2015
NHS struggling to monitor the safety and efficacy of its services outsourced to private providers

Who's monitoring the outsourced NHS services?

A report finds that private firms are not being properly assessed for their quality of care
Zac Goldsmith: 'I'll trigger a by-election over Heathrow'

Zac Goldsmith: 'I'll trigger a by-election over Heathrow'

The Tory MP said he did not want to stand again unless his party's manifesto ruled out a third runway. But he's doing so. Watch this space
How do Greek voters feel about Syriza's backtracking on its anti-austerity pledge?

How do Greeks feel about Syriza?

Five voters from different backgrounds tell us what they expect from Syriza's charismatic leader Alexis Tsipras
From Iraq to Libya and Syria: The wars that come back to haunt us

The wars that come back to haunt us

David Cameron should not escape blame for his role in conflicts that are still raging, argues Patrick Cockburn
Sam Baker and Lauren Laverne: Too busy to surf? Head to The Pool

Too busy to surf? Head to The Pool

A new website is trying to declutter the internet to help busy women. Holly Williams meets the founders
Heston Blumenthal to cook up a spice odyssey for British astronaut manning the International Space Station

UK's Major Tum to blast off on a spice odyssey

Nothing but the best for British astronaut as chef Heston Blumenthal cooks up his rations
John Harrison's 'longitude' clock sets new record - 300 years on

‘Longitude’ clock sets new record - 300 years on

Greenwich horologists celebrate as it keeps to within a second of real time over a 100-day test
Fears in the US of being outgunned in the vital propaganda wars by Russia, China - and even Isis - have prompted a rethink on overseas broadcasters

Let the propaganda wars begin - again

'Accurate, objective, comprehensive': that was Voice of America's creed, but now its masters want it to promote US policy, reports Rupert Cornwell
Why Japan's incredible long-distance runners will never win the London Marathon

Japan's incredible long-distance runners

Every year, Japanese long-distance runners post some of the world's fastest times – yet, come next weekend, not a single elite competitor from the country will be at the London Marathon
Why does Tom Drury remain the greatest writer you've never heard of?

Tom Drury: The quiet American

His debut was considered one of the finest novels of the past 50 years, and he is every bit the equal of his contemporaries, Jonathan Franzen, Dave Eggers and David Foster Wallace
You should judge a person by how they peel a potato

You should judge a person by how they peel a potato

Dave Hax's domestic tips are reminiscent of George Orwell's tea routine. The world might need revolution, but we like to sweat the small stuff, says DJ Taylor
Beige is back: The drab car colours of the 1970s are proving popular again

Beige to the future

Flares and flounce are back on catwalks but a revival in ’70s car paintjobs was a stack-heeled step too far – until now
Bill Granger recipes: Our chef's dishes highlight the delicate essence of fresh cheeses

Bill Granger cooks with fresh cheeses

More delicate on the palate, milder, fresh cheeses can also be kinder to the waistline
Aston Villa vs Liverpool: 'This FA Cup run has been wonderful,' says veteran Shay Given

Shay Given: 'This FA Cup run has been wonderful'

The Villa keeper has been overlooked for a long time and has unhappy memories of the national stadium – but he is savouring his chance to play at Wembley
Timeless drama of Championship race in league of its own - Michael Calvin

Michael Calvin's Last Word

Timeless drama of Championship race in league of its own