Life and Style

If you were inventing a restaurant to promote London's scene it would, surely, be this: Korean street food in Hoxton. It's got in-flight magazine article all over it: "Visitors to London will love this edgy eatery." Shudder.

Howard Jacobson: What the Nazis failed to grasp about dogs

Why don't they tweet drivel, run marathons, fiddle their expenses or take out superinjunctions?

Mark Steel: Can any of us afford to be old now?

One of the most touchingly innocent lines of thought you hear is from financial experts when they're giving advice about the need to provide for our pensions, now the state pension is unreliable. "The earlier you start, the better," they say. And: "It's best to top up your contributions to £400 a month."

Phillip Hodson: A chimp's appetite for having your banana and eating it

At least Gordon Ramsay's father-in-law has been caught out in good company. After being exposed yesterday as the progenitor of a second, secret family, Chris Hutcheson has joined a French President, the billionaire Gordon Getty and OJ Simpson's dead lawyer, not to mention Charles Dickens.

Exclusive: The great university clearance sale

Tuition fee bargains await students who seek last-minute places, says minister

Matthew Norman: Obama has shown the world why it fell in love with him

He is not the Messiah, but he deserves to sleep easy in his bed, and leave the 3am angst to malevolent midgets like Donald Trump who will never trouble him again

How Obama kept the biggest secret of his presidency

The operation against Bin Laden was one thing; concealing it from the world something else

Julie Burchill: Something's wrong when it's only men who take out gagging orders

They say that no man is a hero to his valet, but in recent years the rise of the super-injunction has attempted to build a phoney shield of decency around selected celebrity sleazes rich enough to afford one. Though injunctions are modern inventions, their intention is as old as Adam; they seek to return relations between the sexes to the level of those idealised in Downton Abbey and shown in surprisingly harsh reality in the earlier and far superior Upstairs, Downstairs, when rich men could do exactly as they pleased to parlour maids, prostitutes and showgirls and get away with it.

Baseball: Will the LA Dodgers go down swinging?

A great American sports institution is on the brink of bankruptcy after its owners' fortunes were struck out

Philip Hensher: Fifty books a year is ideal, but why stop at school children?

If the Government can set a target of five fruit and vegetables a day for the adult population, why can't they set a target of 20 books a year?

A life of debt begins here: Will student's money worries ever end?

Once they have graduated, the students of tomorrow face a bleak financial future: tuition fee repayments, a grim jobs market, outrageous house prices and ageing, needy parents. Will their money worries ever end? Amol Rajan does the sums

Market Report: Analysts talk up Smith & Nephew's bid potential

Despite the blue-chip index slumping yesterday to its lowest level since December, Smith & Nephew managed to advance by 3.5p to 718.5p after analysts said that its takeover credentials had received a boost from a study into one of its major rival's devices.

Xstrata's Davis still in the market for Lonmin

Mick Davis, the chief executive at mining giant Xstrata, has privately told investors that he still wants to buy FTSE-100 platinum group Lonmin.

Paul Vallely: The Bookless Child and the Postcode Lottery

Libraries in the PM's backyard have had a reprieve, but closures elsewhere eliminate young borrowers at random

Fold comfort for the lute

We know the problems facing cellists when they fly with their precious instruments: to avoid damage in the hold, they buy a second seat. But things are even worse for players of the now-fashionable theorbo lute which, at over six-feet long, requires a case like a coffin on wheels. Theorbo players travel by road or rail, as flying is out.

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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

James Rhodes on the extraordinary legal battle to publish his memoir
Why we need a 'tranquility map' of England, according to campaigners

It's oh so quiet!

The case for a 'tranquility map' of England
'Timeless fashion': It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it

'Timeless fashion'

It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

Could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive?

Robert Fisk on the Fountainheads of World Evil in 2011 - and 2015
New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

Evolution of swimwear

From bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine