News A mosquito waiting to be studied - scientists have identified the changes to the genes of the malaria parasite that make it resistant to one of the last effective drugs

Discovery of genes that confer resistance to the drug artemisinin is major step forward for treatment of the disease

The Critical Condition: How to make a better viewer

In the second part of our week-long series on the culture of criticism, we consider what it means to be a television critic. What is the TV critic's role? What is his relationship with his subject? And what, ultimately, is his objective? By Thomas Sutcliffe

Information Desk: Your Questions Answered By Our Panel Of Travel Experts

Get back to basics on a holiday in Malta

Health: A killer of a holiday

The advice for tourists at risk of malaria is simple: keep taking the tablets.

Blair promises pounds 60m for fight against malaria

THE PRIME Minister has declared war on malaria by backing an international initiative to wipe out the disease.

The online guide to... Tropical diseases

THE INTERNET, some people think, is like a colossal library, housing the absolute cream of the world's knowledge. It's not. It's more like a very very big pub. For every eruditely argued and painstakingly compiled site, there's another five ragged, dysfunctional and even dangerous alternatives.

Weather Wise

I have tried to keep track in this column with the effects of El Nino, but its true magnitude only came home to me with one line in the latest El Nino update issued by the World Meteorological Organization.

Cross examination

Like many of the vulnerable people spending cold nights on its pavements and in its doorways, King's Cross has effectively lost its identity. Formerly known as Battle Bridge, its current name refers to a short-lived monument to George IV erected in 1836 at the junction of Gray's Inn Road and Euston Road, but demolished nine years later in a road-widening scheme. Property developers of the time were keen to rename Battle Bridge which had become "a haunt of thieves and murderers" and seized the strange folly as their own, thus ousting the proposed "Boudicea's Cross" (a reference to a battle falsely thought to have been fought here between the warrior queen and the Romans) from underground maps of the future.

Short draws attention to Africa's scourge of river blindness

River blindness is the fourth most common cause of blindness in the world. Seventeen million Africans are infected with the disease. And yet, it can easily be be controlled. A relatively simple treatment - a tablet taken annually - can stop the disease in its tracks.

Drought, floods and now disease

Weather: El Nino is being blamed for a wide range of climatic catastrophes in the southern hemisphere - fires, floods, drought, hurricanes, landslides and crop failure among them. As if that were not enough, we are now being warned of another danger: the threat of disease.

Health: Warmer weather brings threat of malaria and cholera to Britain

Global warming could bring olive trees to southern Britain as the world's climate changes more rapidly in the next 100 years than in the previous 10,000. But the rise in temperature could also lead to outbreaks of tropical diseases such as cholera and malaria. Jeremy Laurance, Health Editor, anticipates the hidden dangers of warmer days.

Health: Antimalarial drug that gave minister sleepless nights

Government scientists are urging caution about the use of the antimalarial drug, Lariam, which has been linked with mental symptoms such as hallucinations. Baroness Jay tells Jeremy Laurance, about her experiences with the drug.

Letter: Political unrest spreads malaria

Sir: Jeremy Laurance is right to identify malaria as one of mankind's greatest threats ("Malaria defies new drugs to make a comeback", 20 August), but its resurgence worldwide is not simply a question of drug resistance and climactic changes. Political problems are perhaps the major cause of its spread.

Malaria defies new drugs to make a comeback

Mankind is losing battle against one of the Earth's biggest killers

Getting the travel bug

Long-haul travel is on the increase yet many people aren't being told about the health risks, according to new research.
Career Services

Day In a Page

Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Dubrovnik, the Dalmatian Coast & Montenegro
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Lisbon, Oporto and the Douro Valley
Lake Garda, Venice & Verona
Spain
Prices correct as of 23 January 2015
Syria crisis: Celebrities call on David Cameron to take more refugees as one young mother tells of torture by Assad regime

Celebrities call on David Cameron to take more Syrian refugees

One young mother tells of torture by Assad regime
The enemy within: People who hear voices in their heads are being encouraged to talk back – with promising results

The enemy within

People who hear voices in their heads are being encouraged to talk back
'In Auschwitz you got used to anything'

'In Auschwitz you got used to anything'

Survivors of the Nazi concentration camp remember its horror, 70 years on
Autumn/winter menswear 2015: The uniforms that make up modern life come to the fore

Autumn/winter menswear 2015

The uniforms that make up modern life come to the fore
'I'm gay, and plan to fight military homophobia'

'I'm gay, and plan to fight military homophobia'

Army general planning to come out
Iraq invasion 2003: The bloody warnings six wise men gave to Tony Blair as he prepared to launch poorly planned campaign

What the six wise men told Tony Blair

Months before the invasion of Iraq in 2003, experts sought to warn the PM about his plans. Here, four of them recall that day
25 years of The Independent on Sunday: The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century

25 years of The Independent on Sunday

The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century
Homeless Veterans appeal: 'Really caring is a dangerous emotion in this kind of work'

Homeless Veterans appeal

As head of The Soldiers' Charity, Martin Rutledge has to temper compassion with realism. He tells Chris Green how his Army career prepared him
Wu-Tang Clan and The Sexual Objects offer fans a chance to own the only copies of their latest albums

Smash hit go under the hammer

It's nice to pick up a new record once in a while, but the purchasers of two latest releases can go a step further - by buying the only copy
Geeks who rocked the world: Documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry

The geeks who rocked the world

A new documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry
Belle & Sebastian interview: Stuart Murdoch reveals how the band is taking a new direction

Belle & Sebastian is taking a new direction

Twenty years ago, Belle & Sebastian was a fey indie band from Glasgow. It still is – except today, as prime mover Stuart Murdoch admits, it has a global cult following, from Hollywood to South Korea
America: Land of the free, home of the political dynasty

America: Land of the free, home of the political dynasty

These days in the US things are pretty much stuck where they are, both in politics and society at large, says Rupert Cornwell
A graphic history of US civil rights – in comic book form

A graphic history of US civil rights – in comic book form

A veteran of the Fifties campaigns is inspiring a new generation of activists
Winston Churchill: the enigma of a British hero

Winston Churchill: the enigma of a British hero

A C Benson called him 'a horrid little fellow', George Orwell would have shot him, but what a giant he seems now, says DJ Taylor
Growing mussels: Precious freshwater shellfish are thriving in a unique green project

Growing mussels

Precious freshwater shellfish are thriving in a unique green project