News A mosquito waiting to be studied - scientists have identified the changes to the genes of the malaria parasite that make it resistant to one of the last effective drugs

Discovery of genes that confer resistance to the drug artemisinin is major step forward for treatment of the disease

The Critical Condition: How to make a better viewer

In the second part of our week-long series on the culture of criticism, we consider what it means to be a television critic. What is the TV critic's role? What is his relationship with his subject? And what, ultimately, is his objective? By Thomas Sutcliffe

Information Desk: Your Questions Answered By Our Panel Of Travel Experts

Get back to basics on a holiday in Malta

Health: A killer of a holiday

The advice for tourists at risk of malaria is simple: keep taking the tablets.

Blair promises pounds 60m for fight against malaria

THE PRIME Minister has declared war on malaria by backing an international initiative to wipe out the disease.

The online guide to... Tropical diseases

THE INTERNET, some people think, is like a colossal library, housing the absolute cream of the world's knowledge. It's not. It's more like a very very big pub. For every eruditely argued and painstakingly compiled site, there's another five ragged, dysfunctional and even dangerous alternatives.

Weather Wise

I have tried to keep track in this column with the effects of El Nino, but its true magnitude only came home to me with one line in the latest El Nino update issued by the World Meteorological Organization.

Cross examination

Like many of the vulnerable people spending cold nights on its pavements and in its doorways, King's Cross has effectively lost its identity. Formerly known as Battle Bridge, its current name refers to a short-lived monument to George IV erected in 1836 at the junction of Gray's Inn Road and Euston Road, but demolished nine years later in a road-widening scheme. Property developers of the time were keen to rename Battle Bridge which had become "a haunt of thieves and murderers" and seized the strange folly as their own, thus ousting the proposed "Boudicea's Cross" (a reference to a battle falsely thought to have been fought here between the warrior queen and the Romans) from underground maps of the future.

Short draws attention to Africa's scourge of river blindness

River blindness is the fourth most common cause of blindness in the world. Seventeen million Africans are infected with the disease. And yet, it can easily be be controlled. A relatively simple treatment - a tablet taken annually - can stop the disease in its tracks.

Drought, floods and now disease

Weather: El Nino is being blamed for a wide range of climatic catastrophes in the southern hemisphere - fires, floods, drought, hurricanes, landslides and crop failure among them. As if that were not enough, we are now being warned of another danger: the threat of disease.

Health: Warmer weather brings threat of malaria and cholera to Britain

Global warming could bring olive trees to southern Britain as the world's climate changes more rapidly in the next 100 years than in the previous 10,000. But the rise in temperature could also lead to outbreaks of tropical diseases such as cholera and malaria. Jeremy Laurance, Health Editor, anticipates the hidden dangers of warmer days.

Health: Antimalarial drug that gave minister sleepless nights

Government scientists are urging caution about the use of the antimalarial drug, Lariam, which has been linked with mental symptoms such as hallucinations. Baroness Jay tells Jeremy Laurance, about her experiences with the drug.

Letter: Political unrest spreads malaria

Sir: Jeremy Laurance is right to identify malaria as one of mankind's greatest threats ("Malaria defies new drugs to make a comeback", 20 August), but its resurgence worldwide is not simply a question of drug resistance and climactic changes. Political problems are perhaps the major cause of its spread.

Malaria defies new drugs to make a comeback

Mankind is losing battle against one of the Earth's biggest killers

What to take: a survival kit

l Anti-malaria treatment, if needed
Life and Style
Steve Shaw shows Kate how to get wet behind the ears and how to align her neck
healthSteven Shaw - the 'Buddha of Breaststroke' - applies Alexander Technique to the watery sport
Arts and Entertainment
The sight of a bucking bronco in the shape of a pink penis was too much for Hollywood actor and gay rights supporter Martin Sheen, prompting him to boycott a scene in the TV series Grace and Frankie
tv
Sport
footballShirt then goes on sale on Gumtree
Voices
Terry Sue-Patt as Benny in the BBC children’s soap ‘Grange Hill’
voicesGrace Dent on Grange Hill and Terry Sue-Patt
Arts and Entertainment
Performers drink tea at the Glastonbury festival in 2010
music
Arts and Entertainment
Twin Peaks stars Joan Chen, Michael Ontkean, Kyle Maclachlan and Piper Laurie
tvName confirmed for third series
Sport
Cameron Jerome
footballCanaries beat Boro to gain promotion to the Premier League
Arts and Entertainment
art
Latest stories from i100
Career Services

Day In a Page

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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

James Rhodes on the extraordinary legal battle to publish his memoir
Why we need a 'tranquility map' of England, according to campaigners

It's oh so quiet!

The case for a 'tranquility map' of England
'Timeless fashion': It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it

'Timeless fashion'

It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

Could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive?

Robert Fisk on the Fountainheads of World Evil in 2011 - and 2015
New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

Evolution of swimwear

From bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine