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Britain sends reinforcements to Biscay tuna war

BRITAIN last night announced it was sending a second fisheries protection vessel into the Bay of Biscay amid fears of fresh confrontations in the 'tuna wars' with Spain, as Ministry of Agriculture officials measured the nets used by a Cornish fishing boat escorted home from the area by the Royal Navy.

Let's float the fishing issue: There is a simple solution to tuna wars and fish stock depletion: privatise the high seas, says Nicholas Roe

NOW THAT we have all had the weekend in which to brood about the rights and wrongs of the Bay of Biscay tuna wars, maybe it is time to admit something to ourselves: fish disputes have gone off. They are stale. Old. Whiffy.

Spare the rod and spoil the catch: Fleets of hi-tech vessels armed with vast nets are wrecking a way of life and threatening world fish stocks

THE AXE-WIELDING Spanish fishermen who slashed the nets of British and Irish vessels last week are part of a global fishing crisis.

UK boat 'used illegal tuna net'

A ROYAL NAVY ship yesterday seized fishing gear from a British tuna trawler in the Bay of Biscay that was suspected of breaching European rules by using an illegally long drift net.

Tuna Wars: Fishermen driven to violence by mistrust of unwelcome rivals: Concern that inspectors are ignoring breaches of the rules is at the heart of the dispute. Nicholas Schoon reports

TWO FEET long, about 14lbs in weight, worth pounds 9 at the Cornish quayside, and destined mainly for cans: that is the albacore tuna - a sleek predator of the oceans which Spanish fishermen would prefer to keep for themselves.

UK protests to Spain in tuna wars

The Government protested to Madrid yesterday after attacks on two Cornish fishing boats by furious Spanish tuna fishermen in the Bay of Biscay.

English boats attacked in 'tuna war'

ENGLISH and Spanish fishermen clashed at sea yesterday. Six English trawlers fishing for tuna 400 miles south-west of Land's End claimed that they lost thousands of pounds worth of gear after being attacked by 11 Spanish boats.

'Walls of death' lead to new tuna war: Tourists suffer as Spanish fishing fleet sets up blockade against 'illegal' French fishing methods

SPANISH fishermen who want to bring an end to the 'illegal' fishing practices of the French tuna fleet blockaded ports along their country's northern coast yesterday in a dramatic escalation of the 'tuna war'. The blockade of the port of Santander in Spain forced Brittany Ferries' Val de Loire, with 1,740 passengers and more than 500 cars on board, to turn round for a 20-hour voyage to Roscoff in northern France.

Food & Drink: READER RECIPE / Strong Sicilian tastes

THE showy business of cookery competitions behind us, we resume the rather more humble reader recipe series. Its summer topic, Italian cooking in the British kitchen, has only improved with the weather.

Clash over tuna fishing

French and Spanish fishermen catching tuna in the Atlantic clashed near the Azores at the weekend before naval vessels from their countries intervened, AP reports from Paris.

Fouquet's fowl falls foul of the food flics

A PARIS court yesterday fined the former manager of Fouquet's, the restaurant at 99 Avenue des Champs-Elysees, 40,000 francs ( pounds 4,500) for a menu of gastronomic sins including serving frozen food billed as fresh.

THEATRE / All shirk and low pay: Paul Taylor on a new comedy by Tim Firth at the Stephen Joseph Theatre, Scarborough

A recent play at the Royal Court presented us with the concept of 'McWork', which was what one of the characters felt he was futilely engaged in as a fast-food flogger in a McDonald's outlet. Through the handy device of a reverent Tolpuddle martyr, the drama made a not entirely successful contrast between work then and now. In the early 19th century, Hammett's Apprentice implied, employers may have exploited labour, but at least there was the chance to acquire the dignity and purpose of a craft: equivalent youngsters today find themselves educated for jobs that don't exist and are then obliged to rot themselves on soulless, unskilled toil that is heading nowhere.

Fishing Lines: Why they are no longer slaying our tuna

A RECENT conference in New York called for drastic measures to protect the world's declining stocks of bluefin tuna, or tunny. With annual catches said to be 50 per cent of the breeding population, tunny are now rarer than the common dolphin, which tuna fishermen have been urged to protect.

Food and Drink: Firm favourites from the ocean: Tuna and swordfish are rare and expensive, but when beautifully fresh and cooked to perfection they are among the most delicious of fish

TUNA fishing used to be big business around the north-western tip of Sicily. In early summer, huge shoals of tuna swam past the coast, and many villages and small towns had fleets of tuna boats. Now the shoals have dwindled and the fleets have all but disappeared, though evidence of past abundance remains in the solid tonnara buildings that housed the nets and other equipment. The island of Favignana, a few miles offshore from Trapani, is one of the last places where a tonnara and the characteristic flat-bottomed wooden boats are still in use.

Fishing Lines: Reeling in the Grey legend

WHEN Zane Grey caught a 418lb broadbill swordfish in 1920 off the Californian coast, he should have let the capture alone do the talking for him. As I wrote last week, he was the world's best-selling author and an excellent angler. Though the fish was not a world record, it was still the largest of the year and a notable catch. Grey, however, failed to consider that others might not be quite as enthusiastic, especially in the fiercely competitive Catalina Island Tuna Club.
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