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Is there still a bit of Tony Blair left inside Ed Miliband? The question bugged me as I listened to the Labour leader doing what he does best – giving a speech to a predominantly sympathetic audience – in London today.

The future's bright: the colourful lobby at the Pantone Hotel is the place to hatch plans for the day

24-hour Room Service: Pantone Hotel, Brussels

Wake up to the power of colour.

Watercolor by French artist Paul Cezanne called 'Joueur des Cartes (A Card Player)' from the late 1800's which is to be part of an auction at Christie's in New York

Forgotten work by Cézanne to fetch £12.5m

A long-forgotten work by Paul Cézanne is expected to fetch up to £12.5m at an auction next month.

Album: Ysaÿe, Six Sonatas for Solo Violin, opus 27 – Tai Murray (Harmonia Mundi)

Eugène Ysaÿe's 1924 sonatas anticipate the memorial beauty of Karl Amadeus Hartmann's Suites for Unaccompanied Violin by three years and the desolate fury of Bartók's Sonata for Solo Violin by two decades.

Pierre-Laurent Aimard, Queen Elizabeth Hall, London

There is always a subtext when Pierre-Laurent Aimard plays a recital, but it is seldom as resonant as the one underlying his two linked concerts at the Southbank. It is based on an album called The Liszt Project, in which he juxtaposes piano works by Liszt with 20th-century works reflecting the prophetic nature of his music.

Fright at the museum as strike halts £17m unveiling

The grand re-opening of the world's finest collection of Impressionist paintings has been blocked by striking staff at the Musée d'Orsay in Paris.

Album: Sounds Baroque, Conversazioni I: Cantatas From A Cardinal's Court (Avie)

Conversazioni I presents a programme of baroque pieces reflecting the patronage of Cardinal Pietro Ottoboni, a well-connected young Venetian related to Pope Alexander VII who chose to indulge his passion for music through copious commissions of Albinoni, Handel, and both Scarlattis.

Romanticism: A Very Short Introduction, By Michael Ferber

Possibly the reason that this topic has been left until No.245 in this series is to do with the question of how the hell you define it. Ferber's definition runs to 120 words. You'd highlight: "imagination"; "natural world"; "rebel"; "individual" and "emotional".

Studies in the History of the Renaissance, By Walter Pater

If he is remembered at all, Pater is known for his influence on Oscar Wilde. In his introduction to this "incendiary" text of 1873, Matthew Beaumont describes it as being seen in the "bourgeois imagination" as "the literary equivalent of Zuleika Dobson".

Tom Lubbock: The more we see of his lifelike world the better

Circa 1300, Giotto was the next big thing. Dante mentions him in The Divine Comedy as the artist who now "has the cry". He was more than a trendsetter: he was an original of the most radical type. He began the whole tradition of European painting, transforming it from the flatness of the Greek-Byzantine icon to the rounded solidity of a Roman statue. Realism is the word.

Album: Bach, Motets – Trinity Baroque/Podger (Raum Klang)

Philippe Herreweghe's 1986 recording of the Bach Motets has long been in the small pile of discs to be grabbed in case of a fire. Thanks to Trinity Baroque, that pile is now a little bigger. Prepared by tenor Julian Podger and performed conductorless by single voices and an expressive continuo team of violone and organ, this disc has unparalleled immediacy and drama. With interpolated chant and chorales to compensate for the omission of "Lobert den Herrn", and stunning performances of two chorale preludes on the organ of St Wenzel Church, Naumburg, by James Johnstone, the quality is simply extraordinary.

Still Life, PG

The Judgement of Paris by Ross King

Don't look up, we're all in a chamber-pot

On Beauty by Zadie Smith

At last - Howard gets his End away
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Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
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Air strikes? Talk of God? Obama is following the jihadists’ script

Air strikes? Talk of God? Obama is following the jihadists’ script

The President came the nearest he has come yet to rivalling George W Bush’s gormless reaction to 9/11 , says Robert Fisk
Ebola outbreak: Billy Graham’s son declares righteous war on the virus

Billy Graham’s son declares righteous war on Ebola

A Christian charity’s efforts to save missionaries trapped in Africa by the crisis have been justifiably praised. But doubts remain about its evangelical motives
Jeremy Clarkson 'does not see a problem' with his racist language on Top Gear, says BBC

Not even Jeremy Clarkson is bigger than the BBC, says TV boss

Corporation’s head of television confirms ‘Top Gear’ host was warned about racist language
Nick Clegg the movie: Channel 4 to air Coalition drama showing Lib Dem leader's rise

Nick Clegg the movie

Channel 4 to air Coalition drama showing Lib Dem leader's rise
Philip Larkin: Misogynist, racist, miserable? Or caring, playful man who lived for others?

Philip Larkin: What will survive of him?

Larkin's reputation has taken a knocking. But a new book by James Booth argues that the poet was affectionate, witty, entertaining and kind, as hitherto unseen letters, sketches and 'selfies' reveal
Madame Tussauds has shown off its Beyoncé waxwork in Regent's Park - but why is the tourist attraction still pulling in the crowds?

Waxing lyrical

Madame Tussauds has shown off its Beyoncé waxwork in Regent's Park - but why is the tourist attraction still pulling in the crowds?
Texas forensic astronomer finally pinpoints the exact birth of impressionism

Revealed (to the minute)

The precise time when impressionism was born
From slow-roasted to sugar-cured: how to make the most of the British tomato season

Make the most of British tomatoes

The British crop is at its tastiest and most abundant. Sudi Pigott shares her favourite recipes
10 best men's skincare products

Face it: 10 best men's skincare products

Oscar Quine cleanses, tones and moisturises to find skin-savers blokes will be proud to display on the bathroom shelf
Malky Mackay allegations: Malky Mackay, Iain Moody and another grim day for English football

Mackay, Moody and another grim day for English football

The latest shocking claims do nothing to dispel the image that some in the game on these shores exist in a time warp, laments Sam Wallace
La Liga analysis: Will Barcelona's hopes go out of the window?

Will Barcelona's hopes go out of the window?

Pete Jenson starts his preview of the Spanish season, which begins on Saturday, by explaining how Fifa’s transfer ban will affect the Catalans
Middle East crisis: We know all too much about the cruelty of Isis – but all too little about who they are

We know all too much about the cruelty of Isis – but all too little about who they are

Now Obama has seen the next US reporter to be threatened with beheading, will he blink, asks Robert Fisk
Neanderthals lived alongside humans for centuries, latest study shows

Final resting place of our Neanderthal neighbours revealed

Bones dated to 40,000 years ago show species may have died out in Belgium species co-existed
Scottish independence: The new Scots who hold fate of the UK in their hands

The new Scots who hold fate of the UK in their hands

Scotland’s immigrants are as passionate about the future of their adopted nation as anyone else
Britain's ugliest buildings: Which monstrosities should be nominated for the Dead Prize?

Blight club: Britain's ugliest buildings

Following the architect Cameron Sinclair's introduction of the Dead Prize, an award for ugly buildings, John Rentoul reflects on some of the biggest blots on the UK landscape