Arts and Entertainment

From the Wreckage, Turnage’s 2005 trumpet concerto, was written for the Swedish virtuoso Hakan Hardenberger. Speranza, an LSO commission, is played without the fourth of five movements that Turnage dropped after February’s premiere. The remaining four, the title of each, like that of the work, meaning “hope” – in Arabic, Gaelic, German and Hebrew – are partly inspired by the bleak poetry of Jewish-Romanian poet and Holocaust survivor Paul Celan.

Three of the Johnny Dankworth Seven in 1951: from left, Dankworth, Harvey and Don Rendell

Eddie Harvey: Expressive trombonist who became one of the finest teachers of jazz

'Show us your balls, pal!' was Woody Herman's cry to any player who he felt was underperforming

Album: The Coup, Sorry To Bother You (Anti-)

The Coup's Boots Riley is the prickly conscience at the hip-hop banquet. "Economics is a symphony of punk and death," he declares in "Strange Arithmetic", demanding folk be told "how to flip this system"; while executives are characterised as cannibalistic monsters in "We've Got A Lot To Teach You, Cassius Green".

Album: Mike Svoboda, Da Lontano: Scelsi, Cage, Stockhausen, Nono (Wergo)

In Da Lontano, trombonist Mike Svoboda explores the expressive range of his solo instrument in ways reflecting the diverse agendas of the composers involved.

Jeffrey Stewart and Robert Winslade-Anderson in 'The Emperor of Atlantis'

The Emperor of Atlantis/ Albert Herring, Linbury Studio, London
Tosca, King's Head Theatre, London

From within the death camp, a picaresque story of redemptive love

Album: Alison Balsom, Sound the Trumpet (EMI Classics)

Trumpeters were the star musicians of the Baroque era, their shiny, golden tones vital to evoking the glory of victory and the majesty of kings.

Album: The Feldman Soloists, Crippled Symmetry: at June In Buffalo (Frozen Reeds)

Performed by Morton Feldman's original ensemble at a posthumous celebration of his work held at the 2000 season of June in Buffalo – the annual new-music festival he established in 1975 – this version of his classic "Crippled Symmetry" perfectly captures the poise at the heart of his music.

Album: Benjamin Grosvenor, Rhapsody in Blue (Decca)

On his second Decca set, piano wunderkind Benjamin Grosvenor programmes Gershwin alongside roughly contemporary pieces by Ravel and Saint-Saëns, but it's the connection between Rhapsody in Blue and Ravel's Piano Concerto in G major that gives the album its point.

Sounds Venezuela, Southbank Centre, London

Classical music has never enjoyed a more successful a marketing campaign than that promoting Gustavo Dudamel, the Simon Bolivar Symphony Orchestra, and the proliferation of Jose Antonio Abreu’s visionary Sistema.

Album: Rahsaan Roland Kirk, Spirits Up Above: The Anthology (Rhino/Warner)

Its tertiary title is 1965-76 The Atlantic Years, and that completes the primary information you need.

Album: John Luther, Adamssongbirdsongs (Mode)

Bernie Krause, in his engrossing recent book The Great Animal Orchestra, called attention to the biophony of the natural world, notably the birdsong that fascinated Olivier Messiaen.

Yvonne Howard and Peter Coleman-Wright in Caligula

Caligula, Coliseum, London
King Priam, Dome, Brighton
The Beethoven Encounter, Queen Elizabeth Hall, London

English National Opera does a good hatchet job on an updated bully, but it is the bliss of new generation music-making that resonates

Album: Peter Gabriel, Live Blood (Realworld/Eagle)

After the Scratch My Back and New Blood albums of orchestrated re-imaginings of his and others' songs, and last year's New Blood Live in London DVD, another two-hour, two-CD live set based on the same material may be a case of Peter Gabriel returning to this well once too often.

Staatskapelle Berlin/ Barenboim, Royal Festival Hall

The furtive opening bars of Mozart’s C minor Piano Concerto No. 24 were shrouded in a mellowness of tone that made them welcoming rather than darkly unsettling and as the well upholstered sound of the venerable Staatskapelle Berlin took hold we were cast back into an era of sound and style that was altogether “other”. And then - final confirmation - the piano entered.

Album: Various Artists: Night Music: Voice in the Leaves (Louth Contemporary Music Society)

Named after a piece by the Uzbek composer Dmitri Yanov-Yanovsky, Night Music: Voice in the Leaves explores music from the former Soviet Asian republics, played with dexterity and sensitivity by performers including the theremin virtuoso Lydia Kavina, who excels on Iraida Yusupova's "Kitezh-19", in which her eerily plaintive keening is allied to a tape of varispeeded chimes and plucked strings.

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