Arts and Entertainment

Turner prize-winning artist Anish Kapoor has made a tribute Psy "Gangnam Style" video in support of Chinese dissident artist Ai Weiwei.

Michael Church: Classical music has no Anish Kapoor, thank God!

Anyone wanting to take the pulse of the fine-art world in its present state should use the BBC’s watch-again facility to catch Stephen Sackur’s interview with Anish Kapoor in BBC World’s Hard Talk slot.

My Week: Hans-Ulrich Obrist

In the week he was voted the art world's most powerful figure, the Serpentine Gallery co-director was busy holding meetings at 6.30 in the morning

Dark arts in Turbine Hall

Tate Modern's gloomy new installation reflects the spirit of the times, artist says

Anish Kapoor, Royal Academy, London

The silliest work in the Anish Kapoor exhibition is a kind of shooting range. A cannon is aimed through one of the Royal Academy's ornate doorways. (The public are safely held back.) Every 20 minutes, an operator loads it with a bucketful of deep red gunk. It fires. The gunk hits the wall through the doorway, dribbles down, piling up at the bottom, with much spatter. This will accumulate over the next three months.

Anish Kapoor: Maverick let loose in art's hall of fame

He is both loved by the public and respected by his peers, and soon the Royal Academy will host a huge retrospective by one of the most distinctive artists in its prestigious inner circle. Charles Darwent meets Anish Kapoor

Roma Tearne: 'The success of serious novelists from the subcontinent makes it good to be an Asian writing in Britain'

The day before I left Sri Lanka, I went down to the beach at Mount Lavinia. There are three rocks close to the sand and, using a penknife, I carved my name on one of them. Roma Chrysostom, Colombo, Ceylon, Asia. The World. The Universe. I was a 10-year-old half-Tamil, half-Sinhalese girl on her way to the UK. What followed was not what I expected. Britain in the Sixties was not a place that had much patience with a girl like me living with my family in a depressed part of London. Long before I took my A-levels in English, I was aware that survival depended on the need to integrate into the life of my host country. So out went the Asian accent, the memories of frangipani, and all desire to wear a sari.

Royal Artillery? No, the Royal Academy

Gallery throws open its doors to honour Anish Kapoor – and his exploding cannon

Tom Sutcliffe: If you were an MP, would you do differently?

A phrase we've been hearing a lot of over the last few days is, "If it was us". Indignant constituents have been using it when reporters ask them to comment on the expense claims of their MPs: "If it was us we would be in court", they point out, or "If it was us we'd be in prison". It's a remark that neatly encapsulates the deep sense of unfairness that is one source of the public outrage about MP's expenses. It also reinforces a long-standing prejudice that politicians are a "them" – a species apart identifiable by their venality and double-dealing.

Philip Hensher: Why big isn't always beautiful

The Week In Culture

City slicker: Chicago

The Windy City, home of Barack Obama, is gearing itself up for one of the most exciting presidential elections in many years, says Kate Simon

Summer Exhibition, Royal Academy, London

Who but a lunatic would agree to curate the Royal Academy's Summer Exhibition, a show that this year includes no fewer than 1,129 works of painting, sculpture and much else? How does anybody make sense of it? Fortunately, there are serving academicians who are happy to oblige.

Sculptors go to war with Boris

Leading figures from the arts world criticised Boris Johnson, the new Mayor of London, and said he would be forced into an embarrassing climbdown over his pledge to scrap the competition for a temporary work of art to be placed on the empty plinth in Trafalgar Square every 18 months.

Fourth Plinth, National Gallery, London

Mirrors and meerkats fight the new battle of Trafalgar: Only two serious contenders are among the proposals for London's most famous empty site
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