News Brian Sewell, art critic

The revelation by Brian Sewell, the London Evening Standard's eminent art critic, that he had an affair in 1963 with the strenuously heterosexual Tatler editor Mark Boxer sent shockwaves around the art and journalistic worlds.

creativity Braised seals and the brain drain

Readers have clearly been putting their brain cells to work, working out uses for brain cells.

'Charles Saatchi buys artworks like Imelda Marcos bought shoes'

Jonathan Glancey on the power and influence of Britain's most dedicated and secretive collector of contemporary art

One man and his frock

Where can you see Danny La Rue duetting with Brian Sewell delivering an art lecture on the History of the Bum in Western Art? Or an impersonation of the lovely Jane Seymour, Medicine Woman and new-age healer? Why, in It Took More Than One Man, the latest show from Akimbo and writer and star-performer Ivan Cartwright (right), last seen as a gloriously outlandish Mrs Malaprop in their hit The Rivals: A Queer Appropriation. Beginning in the North of England 30 years ago in the days when men were men and sheep were worried, Ivan cavorts through a childhood which wasn't exactly unalloyed enchantment thanks to episodes like his father returning early from working down the pit to discover our hero, aged four, dressed in his mother's red crinolined frock.

how to win the Turner Prize

1. Do: Team up with a partner. Use only your first names, which ideally should both begin with a 'G'. Call yourselves a "living sculpture", cover yourselves in gold paint and sing a music-hall song - "Underneath the Arches" would do. Later in your career, be sure to make giant colour photographs that look like stained glass. Your subject matter might include young boys, yourselves, naked and pieces of excrement.

Abused, ridiculed, at best tolerated

Men and women see the world in essentially different ways, it is said, and this, for better or worse, is reflected in their art. Consequently, as the comments below - variously patronising, stereotyping, occasionally enlightened - reveal, it is only surprisingly recently that women artists have been taken with anything approaching seriousness.

THE BIG SLEEP Since Monday the actress Tilda Swinton has been lying, apparently asleep, in a glass case for eight hours a day, the centrepiece of an exhibition that features the possessions (and one brain) of famous dead people. 'The Maybe' at the Serpentine Gallery is the first hit of the new season: 20,000 people will have seen it by the time it closes on Sunday. And for once, punters and critics seem to be in general agreement...

Usually, I work at the Hayward or the Royal Academy, so when they told me I was coming here to supervise this show I thought, 'God, this is going to be boring.' But it's tremendous. I really feel part of it now. In fact, Tilda's even asked me to stay here all week, though I would normally be on a new job by now.

Hirst blood

Champion of the underdog Heathcote Williams helps the animals get their revenge on our most celebrated enfant terrible. By Michael Church

Faces to watch in the art world; 2. Stuart Morgan

Stuart Morgan is the curator of the Tate Gallery's current Rites of Passage exhibition, an essayist and editor for art magazines and an inventive - not to say idiosyncratic - lecturer on the art college circuit.

Baby, you can drive my Skoda!

New body. Fresh faced. The revamped Skoda is in town. Richard McClure tests Felicia's pulling power

A Council of despair?

The Arts Council: too extravagant, too tight-fisted, too avant- garde, too safe... or too good for the critics?

Jack Lundin denies Bunhill allegations: Bunhill

OH DEAR. The investigative journalist Jack Lundin sounds decidedly more ordinary in real life than he was in the imagination of my colleague Richard Thomson (Bunhill, 7 August 1994). Lundin has just resurfaced to point out that the article contained misconceptions: Among them were that he performed amputations without anaesthetic in Biafra, walked out of the Observer because someone moved his desk a couple of feet, and kept two tape recorders hidden about his person. And the final point, that he was a lodger in the flat of Brian Sewell, art critic extraordinaire? Well, says Lundin, it is true that "for a couple of years I rented the chill, damp attic of his enormous Kensington mansion". But virtually their only meansof communication was by notes from Sewell (in black if routine, in red ink if peeved).

Putting flesh on Poussin's bones Iain Gale finds Sir Denis Mahon, last of the great gentleman scholars, still pa ssionate in his defence of Poussin the sensualist

`Look at the painting closely and you can see the shaky hand of an old man at work. He preferred to paint landscapes in his late period because he cou ldn't cope with figures. Everything is askew. Nature is taking over'

Cheap thrills and spills on the moral melodrama

In the days when there was a Radio 4 programme called Stop The Week, with Robert Robinson, people who didn't like the programme used to tell me the trouble with it was that as a discussion programme it never got anywhere. I agreed with this, but I alwaysfelt they were judging the programme on entirely the wrong basis.
Latest stories from i100
Career Services

Day In a Page

Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
3.	Provence 6 nights B&B by train from £599pp
Prices correct as of 12 March 2015
The saffron censorship that governs India: Why national pride and religious sentiment trump freedom of expression

The saffron censorship that governs India

Zareer Masani reveals why national pride and religious sentiment trump freedom of expression
Prince Charles' 'black spider' letters to be published 'within weeks'

Prince Charles' 'black spider' letters to be published 'within weeks'

Supreme Court rules Dominic Grieve's ministerial veto was invalid
Distressed Zayn Malik fans are cutting themselves - how did fandom get so dark?

How did fandom get so dark?

Grief over Zayn Malik's exit from One Direction seemed amusing until stories of mass 'cutting' emerged. Experts tell Gillian Orr the distress is real, and the girls need support
The galaxy collisions that shed light on unseen parallel Universe

The cosmic collisions that have shed light on unseen parallel Universe

Dark matter study gives scientists insight into mystery of space
The Swedes are adding a gender-neutral pronoun to their dictionary

Swedes introduce gender-neutral pronoun

Why, asks Simon Usborne, must English still struggle awkwardly with the likes of 's/he' and 'they'?
Disney's mega money-making formula: 'Human' remakes of cartoon classics are part of a lucrative, long-term creative plan

Disney's mega money-making formula

'Human' remakes of cartoon classics are part of a lucrative, long-term creative plan
Easter 2015: 14 best decorations

14 best Easter decorations

Get into the Easter spirit with our pick of accessories, ornaments and tableware
Inside the Kansas greenhouses where Monsanto is 'playing God' with the future of the planet

The future of GM

The greenhouses where Monsanto 'plays God' with the future of the planet
Britain's mild winters could be numbered: why global warming is leaving UK chillier

Britain's mild winters could be numbered

Gulf Stream is slowing down faster than ever, scientists say
Government gives £250,000 to Independent appeal

Government gives £250,000 to Independent appeal

Donation brings total raised by Homeless Veterans campaign to at least £1.25m
Oh dear, the most borrowed book at Bank of England library doesn't inspire confidence

The most borrowed book at Bank of England library? Oh dear

The book's fifth edition is used for Edexcel exams
Cowslips vs honeysuckle: The hunt for the UK’s favourite wildflower

Cowslips vs honeysuckle

It's the hunt for UK’s favourite wildflower
Child abuse scandal: Did a botched blackmail attempt by South African intelligence help Cyril Smith escape justice?

Did a botched blackmail attempt help Cyril Smith escape justice?

A fresh twist reveals the Liberal MP was targeted by the notorious South African intelligence agency Boss
Tony Blair joins a strange and exclusive club of political leaders whose careers have been blighted by the Middle East

Blair has joined a strange and exclusive club

A new tomb has just gone up in the Middle East's graveyard of US and British political reputations, says Patrick Cockburn
Election 2015: Meet the top 12 wacky candidates seeking your vote in May

Election 2015

Meet the top 12 wacky candidates seeking your vote in May