News Brian Sewell, art critic

The revelation by Brian Sewell, the London Evening Standard's eminent art critic, that he had an affair in 1963 with the strenuously heterosexual Tatler editor Mark Boxer sent shockwaves around the art and journalistic worlds.

ARTS / And What's More. . .

The blurb in the art critic Brian Sewell's forthcoming collection ends with 'over the past 25 years he has shared a house in London with four women and nine bitches' . . .

Captain Moonlight: A brush with the rich and famous

LOOK at this picture. Charming, is it not? Should you be having difficulty placing the sitters, they are the Duchess of York and her two daughters, the Princesses Beatrice and Eugenie. The Duchess of York was so taken by it that she is giving it to her estranged husband, the Duke. It is by Barbara Kaczmarowska-Hamilton, a Polish artist. Ms Hamilton is our leading social portraitist. She works in pastels and her nickname is Basha. Her list of subjects includes Prince and Princess Michael of Kent, many other leading figures in English society, and Sir Peregrine Worsthorne. And Professor Norman Stone.

Opinions: Are you politically correct?

TERESA GORMAN, MP: Certainly not. It's so much rubbish. For the whole of my life I've longed to be incorrect. Most people who are PC are intellectual fascists who try to foist their views on ordinary people like me.

The Queen steps in to save New Zealand's mechanical cow

The Queen has rescued the Commonwealth Institute, the concrete big-top in Kensington which houses artistic and cultural objects from more than 50 nations, writes Richard Dowden.

MUSIC / Pop go the classics: Stephen Johnson welcomes the latest voices in new writing

Time was when popular music in any form and new 'serious' composition were mutually exclusive universes. Cornelius Cardew might invoke the odd Chinese workers' revolutionary song, but that was about it. It was widely agreed that, after centuries of cross- fertilisation, high art and the vernacular had finally made the great divorce, and that the breach was irrepairable.

I Confess: Novelist Paul Bailey reads Paul Johnson

EVERY Friday morning I give myself a secret shot of adrenalin by reading Paul Johnson's column in The Spectator. My views incline more to those of the New Statesman, but I read him in order to know what the enemy is thinking. He's absurdly predictable, but that's part of the pleasure.

Letter: In defence of the acerbic art criticism of Brian Sewell

Sir: I was delighted to read Sandra Barwick's thoughtful and thought- provoking article on Brian Sewell (8 January). Confrontations between artists, critics and art historians are nothing new. You refer in the same edition to Herbert Read and Clement Greenberg; one could cite Ruskin and Whistler. The list is endless and acknowledges that art history is nothing if not polemic.

Arch enemy of the critics stings back: The art world is calling for Brian Sewell's head. He is unfazed

Magnificently bitchy, scurrilous and giggly by turns, the art critic Brian Sewell sits at his kitchen table sipping a tiny cup of coffee and displaying only contempt for the 35 artists, critics, art historians and dealers who called last week for his resignation.

Art's unlikely man in the street

WHILE passing the pile of fire bricks in the Tate with interest this week - they had just given me an idea on how to pave my fireplace - my eye was taken by the plethora of notices instructing visitors not to touch. So distracted was I that a few seconds passed before I heard a chinking noise beneath my feet. I looked down. With horror I realised that I was walking over thousands of pounds in the tiled shape of Carl Andre's 144 Magnesium Square (1969). This is the kind of work which irritates Brian Sewell, the Evening Standard's acerbic art critic. It is also, in metaphor, the action of which his ranked attackers now accuse him - of trampling in ignorance on modern art.

Critic caught in the line of artistic fire: Will Bennett finds accusations of homophobia and misogyny give Brian Sewell 'the giggles'

THE CRITIC Brian Sewell, who has never been a stranger to controversy, has been accused of 'virulent homophobia and misogyny' by leading figures in the London arts world.

Coales' Notes: Double negatives: Gordon Coales attends the Ars Longa Christmas party, and regrets it

WEDNESDAY: Our Christmas party. I really hadn't planned at all. But I thought, this might possibly be the last thing I do for Ars Longa: may as well. I arrived as late as possible, and walked straight into Rory and Silver, who was swanning about like a king: 'Well, Gordon, they're all here, aren't they? They're all here. The whole bloody arts world. That's the magic of Kirsty and Siobhan, eh? They can get everyone.' I said, marvellous, yes. Rory gave me a broad wink.

ARTS / The most hated man in British art: Michael Craig-Martin would be bad enough on his own; but what they'll never forgive him for is inflicting his evil progeny upon the art world. Iain Gale met the guru of Goldsmiths'

Michael Craig-Martin is the most hated man in British art. In the press and in public debate he is attacked as 'narrow-minded' and 'manipulative', while in private his critics favour more emotive words: 'sinister', 'perverse', 'evil'.

Tickets don't worry the big wheels

HOW do you cope with the horrors and difficulties of parking in today's cities? The answer is that you've probably given up trying, so we've asked nine celebrities to tell us their secrets for beating the traffic warden.
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