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Willie Mitchell told his victim 'I'm gonna show you' before shooting her vehicle

Hand transplant possible in UK

THE BRITISH specialist involved in the world's first successful hand transplant, performed in France last year, said yesterday he was ready to do a similar operation in the UK.

Obituary: Bob Cato

IN OUR self-conscious era, the art director has moved from anonymity to creative celebrity. Bob Cato is part of this pantheon, not only because he designed many cult record sleeves but also because he embodied the hip Manhattan art director in his golden era.

Woodward's team launch new inquiry

LAWYERS WHO represented Louise Woodward in her Boston murder trial said yesterday that they will instigate a full scientific inquiry into fresh claims, made in a CBS television news programme at the weekend, that the child who had been in her care, Matthew Eappen, died from strangulation.

Woodward lawyers demand review after `strangle' claim

THE LAWYERS who represented the British au pair Louise Woodward in her Boston murder trial are demanding that the medical evidence surrounding the death of baby Matthew Eappen in February 1997 be formally re-evaluated in the light of new claims that he may have been strangled.

`Woodward baby was strangled', say doctors

A PAEDIATRIC doctor has claimed that the baby the au pair Louise Woodward was convicted of killing in the United States was not shaken to death as was claimed, but strangled.

CBS chief wants television merger with NBC

THE PROSPECT of a huge merger that would reshape America's television industry was raised yesterday as the chairman of CBS, the largest TV network, said that he wanted to buy its rival NBC. Though the deal raises huge issues of competition and finance, it intrigued the market.

Obituary: Gene Siskel

WHEN THE film critic Barry Norman left BBC1's Film 98 and joined Sky Premier last year, the announcement barely ruffled the pages of the British press. In North America, Gene Siskel's death was headline news over the weekend.

US TV pays dearly for its image of anchorwomen

DRIVE INTO any large American city and you will see them - billboards entreating you to watch such and such a television station for the excellence of its evening news. Beaming down at you with impossible smiles will be the faces of that station's newsreaders. Almost always, it will be a man, chisel-chin and serious eyebrows, accompanied by a woman, all glamour and cheekbone.

Slap in face for young blondes as over-40 wins TV bias case

IF YOU have ever been infuriated by the formulaic TV news shows in the US, which pair a blandly handsome male of any age with a decidedly under- forties blonde, this verdict is for you. A court in Connecticut has awarded Janet Peckinpaugh, who is now very much the "wrong" side of 40 but still almost blond, more than $8m (pounds 5m) in compensation after she was dropped as a $200,000-plus-a-year news presenter.

Murder charge over TV mercy killing

JACK KEVORKIAN, the militant euthanasia campaigner known as Doctor Death, was charged yesterday with murder and other crimes, presaging the courtroom showdown for which he has long hankered. The charges were brought after prosecutors in Michigan viewed a videotape that purports to show him injecting a terminally ill patient.

TV: The News: The 'new news', read by a drudge in his bedroom

I seem to have been visiting a lot of newsrooms, and this week it was the turn of the BBC's busy Westminster newsroom in the legendary Four Millbank. This is the building, down the road from the Houses of Parliament, from which the BBC, ITN, Sky News and several foreign broadcasting organizations operate. Arguably Four Millbank, not the Commons chamber, is the centre of our political life.

President In Crisis: Popularity polls show class divide

BILL CLINTON'S approval rating has increased since January despite revelations about his sexual behaviour and allegations of perjury, a New York Times/CBS News opinion poll showed yesterday. But the American population has become yet further polarised over its President.

BNFL to buy US nuclear reprocessor in $1bn deal

BRITISH NUCLEAR Fuels is buying a major part of CBS Westinghouse for around $1bn, making the UK state-owned group the biggest nuclear reprocessor in the world.

BNFL eyes US

BRITISH NUCLEAR FUELS last night refused to comment on reports that a consortium of which it is a part was well placed to win a US-based nuclear power business from CBS.

Frank Sinatra: The one man in America who; could do whatever he wanted

`He seemed now to be the embodiment of the fully emancipated male, perhaps the only one in America.' That was how the American-Italian writer Gay Talese (left) described Frank Sinatra at 50. The year was 1965, Beatlemania was at its height, but Sinatra, product of everything that was pre-Sixties, was at the height of his powers; he was worshipped and he was feared. In this piece, first published in the American edition of `Esquire', Talese captures him with a vividness and knowingness that has rarely been equalled
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Refugee crisis: David Cameron lowered the flag for the dead king of Saudi Arabia - will he do the same honour for little Aylan Kurdi?

Cameron lowered the flag for the dead king of Saudi Arabia...

But will he do the same honour for little Aylan Kurdi, asks Robert Fisk
Our leaders lack courage in this refugee crisis. We are shamed by our European neighbours

Our leaders lack courage in this refugee crisis. We are shamed by our European neighbours

Humanity must be at the heart of politics, says Jeremy Corbyn
Joe Biden's 'tease tour': Could the US Vice-President be testing the water for a presidential run?

Joe Biden's 'tease tour'

Could the US Vice-President be testing the water for a presidential run?
Britain's 24-hour culture: With the 'leisured society' a distant dream we're working longer and less regular hours than ever

Britain's 24-hour culture

With the 'leisured society' a distant dream we're working longer and less regular hours than ever
Diplomacy board game: Treachery is the way to win - which makes it just like the real thing

The addictive nature of Diplomacy

Bullying, betrayal, aggression – it may be just a board game, but the family that plays Diplomacy may never look at each other in the same way again
Lady Chatterley's Lover: Racy underwear for fans of DH Lawrence's equally racy tome

Fashion: Ooh, Lady Chatterley!

Take inspiration from DH Lawrence's racy tome with equally racy underwear
8 best children's clocks

Tick-tock: 8 best children's clocks

Whether you’re teaching them to tell the time or putting the finishing touches to a nursery, there’s a ticker for that
Charlie Austin: Queens Park Rangers striker says ‘If the move is not right, I’m not going’

Charlie Austin: ‘If the move is not right, I’m not going’

After hitting 18 goals in the Premier League last season, the QPR striker was the great non-deal of transfer deadline day. But he says he'd preferred another shot at promotion
Isis profits from destruction of antiquities by selling relics to dealers - and then blowing up the buildings they come from to conceal the evidence of looting

How Isis profits from destruction of antiquities

Robert Fisk on the terrorist group's manipulation of the market to increase the price of artefacts
Labour leadership: Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea

'If we lose touch we’ll end up with two decades of the Tories'

In an exclusive interview, Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea
Tunisia fears its Arab Spring could be reversed as the new regime becomes as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor

The Arab Spring reversed

Tunisian protesters fear that a new law will whitewash corrupt businessmen and officials, but they are finding that the new regime is becoming as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor
King Arthur: Legendary figure was real and lived most of his life in Strathclyde, academic claims

Academic claims King Arthur was real - and reveals where he lived

Dr Andrew Breeze says the legendary figure did exist – but was a general, not a king
Who is Oliver Bonas and how has he captured middle-class hearts?

Who is Oliver Bonas?

It's the first high-street store to pay its staff the living wage, and it saw out the recession in style
Earth has 'lost more than half its trees' since humans first started cutting them down

Axe-wielding Man fells half the world’s trees – leaving us just 422 each

However, the number of trees may be eight times higher than previously thought
60 years of Scalextric: Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones

60 years of Scalextric

Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones