News Bitcoin is an experimental digital currency that has gained popularity worldwide

James Howells accidentally threw away a hard drive containing the cryptographic "private key" needed to access the digital currency

Heseltine overrules MMC and triggers submarine warfare

BY RUSSELL HOTTEN

Head of MMC backs reform

Graeme Odgers, the chairman of the Monopolies and Mergers Commission, this weekend called for the reform of competition legislation to give the Office of Fair Trading tougher powers against restrictive practices. He also added to the pressure on Michael Heseltine, President of the Board of Trade, to admit that Britain is in danger of falling behind in competition policy and change the law.

Watch out! There's a Ram-raider about

Why are memory chips such hot items for smart thieves? Mike Hewitt explains

Decision due on VSEL bids

BY RUSSELL HOTTEN

Churchill's legend lives on

YOUR article about the Churchill archives mentions fleetingly the possibility of "transferring everything into computer memory". In fact, a computer system could not only store the documents, but also greatly enrich the archive. By means of appropriate "document imaging" techniques, the entire archive can be indexed to a depth which is totally impractical for paper, photocopies or microfilm. Individual documents can be "linked" permanently to any number of other related documents and all of the documents can be available all of the time to several researchers simultaneously. Storing copies in computer systems means that the intellectual content of the archive is secured against catastrophic loss because back-up copies can easily be kept at several sites. All this could be achieved today for a fraction of the amount spent just on transferring the ownership of the original documents. A photocopier might indeed have done just as well, but a document imaging system would have done better.

BAe to get go-ahead for VSEL

BY RUSSELL HOTTEN

A concept that will really click

Digital photography could soon be accessible to all, thanks to a new system developed by Kodak. Paul Rodgers reports

Time for BT to shut up

There is really only one way of describing last night's capitulation by BT to all but one of the demands being made by the regulator, Oftel. BT is behaving like a wimp. After all the posturing and bluster of the last month or two, it has meekly caved in to everything Don Cruickshank was asking for bar paying for the costs of number portability. That issue will now go the Monopolies and Mergers Commission, but everything else has been accepted - this, despite BT's insistence that enough was enough and this time it was going to give the regulator a jolly good hiding.

BT to face monopoly inquiry

BY MARY FAGAN

BAe fuels VSEL hopes in cash call for VSEL hopes deckys

British Aerospace has underlined its confidence it will win the battle with GEC for VSEL by reviving the second part of a rights issue to fund the takeover.

CREULTY WITHOUT BEAUTY

LETTER:

Techno-suit: a snip at half the price

Sartorial saviour or end of an era? Robin Dutt tries laser suits for size

Heseltine may challenge MMC decision

The Government would not overrule any decision by the electricity regulator, Offer, to refer the Trafalgar House bid for Northern Electric to the Monopolies and Mergers Commission, writes Mary Fagan.

G A D G E T S Great pics, shame about the noughts

If you're a photography freak with lots of money, take a look at Kodak's new DCS 460, billed as the "world's highest resolution, portable, single shot, digital camera". It looks like the motor drive that clips on to the bottom of standard SLR cameras and is designed for the Nikon N90; there is an equivalent for the Canon EOS-1N, too. But the DCS 460 costs £24,950 and contains a light-sensitive plate, a chip to digitise the image, a PCMCIA memory card to store it, a microphone and a battery pack.

Generators plan hefty dividends

National Power and PowerGen set out to woo shareholders yesterday by unveiling hefty dividends for the current financial year. Marking the pathfinder prospectus for the £4bn goverment sale of shares in the companies, National Power said that the payout would rise by 24 per cent per share to 15.45p while PowerGen will increase its dividend by almost 19 per cent to 15p. The increase was announced as the Government confirmed that private investors must pay a minimum of about £1,000 to participate in the sale, buying a package of at least 200 shares in the companies. The minimum investment is higher than in other recent government offers, suggesting it is targeted at more sophisticated private investors.
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Isis hostage crisis: The prisoner swap has only one purpose for the militants - recognition its Islamic State exists and that foreign nations acknowledge its power

Isis hostage crisis

The prisoner swap has only one purpose for the militants - recognition its Islamic State exists and that foreign nations acknowledge its power, says Robert Fisk
Missing salvage expert who found $50m of sunken treasure before disappearing, tracked down at last

The runaway buccaneers and the ship full of gold

Salvage expert Tommy Thompson found sunken treasure worth millions. Then he vanished... until now
Homeless Veterans appeal: ‘If you’re hard on the world you are hard on yourself’

Homeless Veterans appeal: ‘If you’re hard on the world you are hard on yourself’

Maverick artist Grayson Perry backs our campaign
Assisted Dying Bill: I want to be able to decide about my own death - I want to have control of my life

Assisted Dying Bill: 'I want control of my life'

This week the Assisted Dying Bill is debated in the Lords. Virginia Ironside, who has already made plans for her own self-deliverance, argues that it's time we allowed people a humane, compassionate death
Move over, kale - cabbage is the new rising star

Cabbage is king again

Sophie Morris banishes thoughts of soggy school dinners and turns over a new leaf
11 best winter skin treats

Give your moisturiser a helping hand: 11 best winter skin treats

Get an extra boost of nourishment from one of these hard-working products
Paul Scholes column: The more Jose Mourinho attempts to influence match officials, the more they are likely to ignore him

Paul Scholes column

The more Jose Mourinho attempts to influence match officials, the more they are likely to ignore him
Frank Warren column: No cigar, but pots of money: here come the Cubans

Frank Warren's Ringside

No cigar, but pots of money: here come the Cubans
Isis hostage crisis: Militant group stands strong as its numerous enemies fail to find a common plan to defeat it

Isis stands strong as its numerous enemies fail to find a common plan to defeat it

The jihadis are being squeezed militarily and economically, but there is no sign of an implosion, says Patrick Cockburn
Virtual reality thrusts viewers into the frontline of global events - and puts film-goers at the heart of the action

Virtual reality: Seeing is believing

Virtual reality thrusts viewers into the frontline of global events - and puts film-goers at the heart of the action
Homeless Veterans appeal: MP says Coalition ‘not doing enough’

Homeless Veterans appeal

MP says Coalition ‘not doing enough’ to help
Larry David, Steve Coogan and other comedians share stories of depression in new documentary

Comedians share stories of depression

The director of the new documentary, Kevin Pollak, tells Jessica Barrett how he got them to talk
Has The Archers lost the plot with it's spicy storylines?

Has The Archers lost the plot?

A growing number of listeners are voicing their discontent over the rural soap's spicy storylines; so loudly that even the BBC's director-general seems worried, says Simon Kelner
English Heritage adds 14 post-war office buildings to its protected lists

14 office buildings added to protected lists

Christopher Beanland explores the underrated appeal of these palaces of pen-pushing
Human skull discovery in Israel proves humans lived side-by-side with Neanderthals

Human skull discovery in Israel proves humans lived side-by-side with Neanderthals

Scientists unearthed the cranial fragments from Manot Cave in West Galilee