Deep Pan Pizza chain hit by upmarket dining trend

Pizza is proving a turn-off for restaurant goers who are choosing to splash out money on expensive and ever more exotic meals.

Theatre Review: Strive to please another day

Shakespeare's `Twelfth Night' RSC, Stratford-upon-Avon

Letter: Polenta - a delicacy eaten by magpies

Sir: I fully sympathise with Charlie Burgess's assessment of polenta (letter, 13 June) and his latitude theory.

A feast at their fingers

John Ogdon 60th Anniversary Gala Queen Elizabeth Hall, London

Letter: Heseltine behind metric chaos

Sir: Chris Keenan (letter, 7 November) has unfortunately mixed up metrication with unit pricing - an easy mistake to make. Metrication has required that all pre-packed goods have to be sold in metric measures within supermarkets. Products sold loose, such as off the delicatessen counter, can continue to be sold in imperial units until 1 January 2000.

Letter:Be careful not to boil your husband's

At our local market a fresh fish stall has a hand-written card offering the delicacy Crab Stix's, easily trumping the vegetable stalls' (stall's, stalls's?) potatoe's and carrot's.

LETTER : Top table manners

Sir: Is England the only country where you can immediately tell a person's class origins (reports, 18 April) by the way they hold their knife and fork? The clenched fists of the worker, presumably to cut impossibly tough cheap meat. The delicacy of the lower middle class, knife and fork as quill pens lightly to cut through ham salad Sunday teas. The confident firm handling of the middle classes, able to cope with any number of Islington restaurant styles. What of the aristocracy? Because of the class system I have been unable to test my theory at this level.

A hell of a ride

THE INFERNO OF DANTE: A New Verse Translation by Robert Pinsky, Dent pounds 20

Save me from this noisome pestilence

I WATCHED a fat builder burst, this morning. Well; not quite burst, but, from the spectator's point of view, about as close to bursting as you could go without having to turn up at the inquest, which is always a bore.

Wild at heart

Roger Clarke feels a sensuous touch amid the chainsaw scars

where shall we meet?

Lok Ho Fook, W1

CASE SUMMARIES Monday 16 January 1995

The following notes of judgments were prepared by the reporters of the All England Law Reports.

THEATRE / Expect the unexpected: The Venetian Twins - Barbican Theatre

Wacky 'unscheduled' events are such an expected feature of Michael Bogdanov's productions that an audience would only faint with surprise if they failed to occur. You certainly wonder how many of them are taken in when his version of Goldoni's Venetian Twins is brought to a juddering halt by an accident in which a supposed punter is impaled on a brolly. Technicians, ambulancemen and police invade the stage - along with Bogdanov himself and Hermes from the production of Ion next door. It's all so laborious it makes you long to slip out to the telephones and put in a real summons for the police. The result would be very Pirandello.

Proms / Only connect: Stephen Johnson on the premiere of Peter Maxwell Davies's new symphony

Connecting threads in Proms programmes aren't always easy to find, though there was more than a hint of a scheme in Tuesday's musical assortment. At the centre was the premiere of Sir Peter Maxwell Davies's Fifth Symphony, conducted by the composer. Around it Matthias Bamert and the Philharmonia Orchestra placed works by composers who in different ways could be seen as Davies's musical ancestors. There was Webern's Passacaglia, Op 1, to remind us of Davies's Second Viennese School roots. Initiated ears could also note how Webern's blurring and focusing of his basic tonality and his ingenious, sometimes hermetic transformation of leading motifs are echoed and developed in Davies's writing.

THEATRE / Far from the good life: Paul Taylor praises David Storey's Home at Wyndham's

One of the advantages of a late lunch, of course,' Jack declares in David Storey's Home, 'is that it leaves a shorter space to tea.' Having time to kill is an occupational hazard in plays influenced by Beckett, but at least, in Waiting for Godot, Vladimir and Estragon have something, however illusory, to wait for. In Storey's poignant, often painfully funny tone poem of a play, the five characters - inmates in what is gradually revealed to be a vast mental hospital - don't even have that consolation. And there's certainly no release date, you gather, for them to count the days to.
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