Viktor and the wolf

Viktor Fedotov, chief conductor of the Kirov, is that rare animal: a musician who can satisfy both composers and dancers. But then he's been wielding the baton since he was 15. Louise Levene meets the maestro who never sleeps

DANCE / Swan Lake The Kirov at the Coliseum, London

It is rare to see a Swan Lake in which neither Odette nor Siegfried is a disappointment but on Friday Igor Zelensky and Uliana Lopatkina gave a splendid performance of the Kirov's grand, no-nonsense production which indicated that the company may yet overcome its current problems.

WEEK IN REVIEW .TEXT: THE BALLET The Kirov's Don Quixote

overview The Kirov began a five-week London season with the British premiere of the characterful, comic four-act ballet about the innkeeper's daughter who wants to marry the barber, led by star dancers Igor Zelensky and Altynai Asylmuratova with Minkus's score in the hands of Viktor Fedotov.

DANCE Don Quixote The Kirov, Coliseum, London

How wise of the Kirov to open the company's five-week London season with the British premiere of Don Quixote. Superbly danced and often hilariously funny, the ballet is sure to be a huge hit. The scenario, broadly similar to the Baryshnikov and Nureyev productions, is essentially the tale of Kitri, the innkeeper's daughter, who wishes to marry Basil, the barber, despite her father's ambitions. The Don, played with melancholy grandeur by Vladimir Ponomarev, wanders in and out of the action providing a diversion when the lovers need to escape, and helping to cement their union at the ballet's close.

Keeping in step

The Kirov Ballet has been performing `Don Quixote' since its creation by the company's founding father in 1869. And they remain true to its original spirit. Today sees its first London staging. By John Percival

Ding, dang, Don!

Review: CLASSICAL: BCMG Adrian Boult Hall, Birmingham

The reality myth and miss

Paul Taylor on the rarely sighted `Cymbeline' and `Camino Real' at Stratford

Music: Walton's a white hope once again

The Critics

You hum it, they'll make it

Never mind the arias, where did they get that python? Gina Cowen goes backstage to investigate opera's fantasy factory

A Spaniard in his works

music on radio

Edinburgh Festival: Fringe round-up: The Quest for Don Quixote / Don Juan

It sounds good on paper: former members of Theatre de Complicite take on the the two Dons and - as you'd expect - make a few little alterations. Quixote is an old man who carries with him Cervantes' novel. Sancho Panza and Dulcinea are acted by his servants, and the adventures take place in a barn tiled with raffia mats and baskets (both shows are beautifully designed), with adults playing children's games, tilting at windmills made of stepladders and poles. Gerry Flanagan's monotone man of La Mancha is convincingly senile, but never manages the insane joy of the dreamer.There's nothing remotely quixotic about the style of performance. In Don Juan, even the seduction is passionless: smartly choreographed, but you can sense the director (John Wright, no less) marking out each girlish wiggle and shuffle of the Don's boots.

All work, all play

Slava Polunin is widely acknowledged as the world's greatest clown. But don't ask him to be anything less than serious. By Adrian Turpin

Exorcising the demons within

Nine years ago, the playwright Tom Kempinski weighed 24 stone and couldn't get past the front door. Now he's slimmed down and can turn out one play a month.

replay: Ravel: The Last Six Compositions (1928-34) Pedro de Freitas Branco, Piero Coppola, Alfred Cortot, Marguerite Long, Charles Munch, Martial Singher (Recorded 1930-1939) (EMI Classics 5 65499 2))

Now here's a thought-provoking slice of musical history. The annotator James Harding relates that for the last 78 rpm "side" of Bolero, Ravel asked the conductor Piero Coppola not to go so fast. "They began again," writes Harding, "and went on until Ravel was satisfied." Still, I do sometimes wonder whether HMV issued the right take - for what we actually hear is a sudden jolt forwards followed by a gradual slowing down. Certainly, as Boleros go, this 1930 world premiere recording is slower, rhythmically freer and rather less well-executed than most.
Latest stories from i100
SPONSORED FEATURES
Career Services

Day In a Page

A
Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
Turkey's conflict with Kurdish guerrillas in Iraq can benefit Isis in Syria

Turkey's conflict with Kurdish guerrillas in Iraq can benefit Isis in Syria

Turkish President Erdogan could benefit politically from the targeting of the PKK, says Patrick Cockburn
Yvette Cooper: Our choice is years of Tory rule under Jeremy Corbyn or a return to a Labour government

Our choice is years of Tory rule under Corbyn or a return to a Labour government

Yvette Cooper urged Labour members to 'get serious' about the next general election rather than become 'a protest movement'
Singapore's domestic workers routinely exploited and often abused in the service of rich nationals

Singapore's hidden secret of domestic worker abuse

David Cameron was shown the country's shiniest veneer on his tour. What he didn't see was the army of foreign women who are routinely exploited and often abused in the service of rich nationals
Showdown by Shirley Jackson: A previously unpublished short story from the queen of American Gothic

Showdown, by Shirley Jackson

A previously unpublished short story from the queen of American Gothic
10 best DSLRs

Be sharp! 10 best DSLRs

Up your photography game with a versatile, powerful machine
Solved after 200 years: the mysterious deaths of 3,000 soldiers from Napoleon's army

Solved after 200 years

The mysterious deaths of 3,000 soldiers from Napoleon's army
Every regional power has betrayed the Kurds so Turkish bombing is no surprise

Robert Fisk on the Turkey conflict

Every regional power has betrayed the Kurds so Turkish bombing is no surprise
Investigation into wreck of unidentified submarine found off the coast of Sweden

Sunken sub

Investigation underway into wreck of an unidentified submarine found off the coast of Sweden
Instagram and Facebook have 'totally changed' the way people buy clothes

Age of the selfie

Instagram and Facebook have 'totally changed' the way people buy clothes
Not so square: How BBC's Bloomsbury saga is sexing up the period drama

Not so square

How Virginia Woolf saga is sexing up the BBC period drama
Rio Olympics 2016: The seven teenagers still carrying a torch for our Games hopes

Still carrying the torch

The seven teenagers given our Olympic hopes
The West likes to think that 'civilisation' will defeat Isis, but history suggests otherwise

The West likes to think that 'civilisation' will defeat Isis...

...but history suggests otherwise
The bald truth: How one author's thinning hair made him a Wayne Rooney sympathiser

The bald truth

How thinning hair made me a Wayne Rooney sympathiser
Froome wins second Tour de France after triumphant ride into Paris with Team Sky

Tour de France 2015

Froome rides into Paris to win historic second Tour
Fifteen years ago, Concorde crashed, and a dream died. Today, the desire to travel faster than the speed of sound is growing once again

A new beginning for supersonic flight?

Concorde's successors are in the works 15 years on from the Paris crash