Lou Reed

Hell hath no fury like an ego scorned

The NME editor has made a grovelling apology for her campaign against singer Ed Sheeran. Nadia Khomami looks at spats between popsters and the press

Album: Lou Reed & Metallica, Lulu (Mercury)

Lulu may be the ultimate Goth album: steeped in art-house self-regard, mired in the vilest extremes of perversion and misery, barked out with as little human warmth as its practitioners can muster and its leaden tortures drawn out to unbearable lengths, it takes the notion of being "drawn to the dark side" to the nth degree.

Smit adds to Saracens' Springbok accent

South Africa captain John Smit will join Saracens in October after the conclusion of the World Cup. The 33-year-old is the most capped captain and forward in Springbok history, having featured in 102 Tests.

Album: Laurie Anderson, Homeland (Nonesuch)

Anderson's first studio album in 10 years is one to divide opinion – either enough to induce "stultifying boredom" (the NME) or one that makes her "the most important multimedia artist of our time" (The LA Times).

Album: Laurie Anderson Homeland (Nonesuch)

As the title suggests, Homeland sees Laurie Anderson returning to the familiar territory of her opus magnum United States I-IV, with a series of ruminations and observations upon her native land, in which unashamed intellectualism – references to Kierkegaard, Thomas Paine, etc – is balanced by her dry wit and ironic delivery.

Album: The Bundles, The Bundles (K Records)

Even by their own slack standards, it's something of a surprise that it has taken a decade for Kimya (Moldy Peaches, Juno soundtrack) Dawson and Jeffrey Lewis to record together. The pair met in New York City during the anti-folk movement of the late 1990s and wrote five songs before going their separate ways. The Bundles' debut album contains those songs and five more, all of which are utterly charming and fall just the right side of twee - think late-period Velvet Underground if MoTucker had had equalbilling to Lou Reed.

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