Arts and Entertainment

The reciprocal half of Gabriel’s I’ll-cover-yours-if-you’ll-cover-mine project Scratch My Back, in which his correspondents respond to his proposition by covering PG songs in return - a round dozen of them, including “Biko”, “Shock the Monkey” and, ill-advisedly, “Don’t Give Up”.

Music: There's something about Jonathan

Jonathan Richman introduced us to the abominable snowman in the supermarket. Now, like wow, he's a film star.

Pop: Moving, but little commotion

LLOYD COLE

First And Last

From the record collection of tanita Tikaram

Come on in, the Warhol's lovely

This summer, it's a case of simply Nico and very Marilyn. Bridget Virden on underground clubbing's answer to the Factory

Five fading careers revived on celluloid

1 Wet Wet Wet: 'Love Is All Around' - 'Four Weddings And A Funeral'

Oh, it's such a perfect song

One of the Sunday Review's greatest hits returns for an encore as Tim de Lisle tells the full story of 'Perfect Day'; LIVES OF THE GREAT SONGS: PERFECT DAY

Blurred vision at the Beeb

Aunty's perfect day

Film: House of America Marc Evans (15)

You know you are in capable hands right at the beginning of House of America, when the film cuts from the Velvet Underground's "I'm Waiting for the Man", in which Lou Reed sings "Here he comes all dressed in black", to a shot of a young man in a banana-yellow cagoule astride a motorbike that refuses to do anything more than splutter pathetically. Few film- makers choose to exploit the tension and humour that a conflicting use of sound and image can create, but the first-time director Marc Evans perfectly captures the gulf between fantasy and reality with that single, witty juxtaposition.

Media: Good Ad Bad Ad-Leagus Delaney BBC

In which a leading advertising expert picks some of the best and worst around. This week Dave Buonoguidi, joint creative director, St Luke's, on television commercials high and low

Oh such a perfect ad - but we'll just keep you hanging on for the CD

The BBC's star-studded version of a Lou Reed classic looks a certain hit. But there are complications. Vanessa Thorpe reports

Review: POP: Lou Reed Meltdown Festival, Royal Festival Hall, London

It was shortly after one of his greatest triumphs that Lou Read began to slip. New York, recorded in 1989, was his critical and commercial vindication. It convinced Reed that he was rock's premiere poet, a respectable artist. The results on record have been mixed but live they've been the death of him. The unpredictability of his old, wired days has been replaced by shows typified by a 1989 tour, which is still remembered with a shiver, when he played his current album with note-perfect reverence, made identical "asides" to the audience each night and played an encore of old songs with utter contempt.

Rock: Listen carefully: Mansun only play once

Rejoice! rejoice! A no-encore gig! Paul Draper pushed his guitar up against an amp, the noise buckled and crashed ... and that was it. Mansun had left the building, and Abba's "Dancing Queen" was already blaring from the PA. Excellent. I know that not everybody shares my loathing of the cliched, insincere "encore" ritual, when the singer bids us goodnight knowing full well he's going to reappear two minutes later. But I also know that encores are so pervasive that when a group doesn't do them, it merits a mention. Besides, the last young bands I saw who skipped the insulting formality were Suede and Oasis. Is Mansun's omission an intimation of similar greatness? In their own minds, definitely.

MUSIC: Charlie Barber and band; Chapter Arts Centre, Cardiff

If crossing the borders between different forms has become one of the most distinctive attributes of contemporary "straight" music, there's still a slightly schoolboyish transgressive thrill to be had by hearing The Velvet Underground's "Sister Ray" in a concert programme. Arranged by Barnaby Oliver for Barber's 12-piece band, Lou Reed's epic thrash retained its essential elements, the three-chord trick of the original stretched to breaking-point by thrumming strings, blasting horns and satisfyingly noisy percussion. With Philip Glass having already made symphonies out of Bowie's Low and Heroes, an oratorio based on the works of Johnny Moped surely can't be far behind.

Film: Above it all

A new film captures the strange mystique of Nico, the accidental icon. By Louise Gray
Latest stories from i100
Career Services

Day In a Page

A
Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine
Letterman's final Late Show: Laughter, but no tears, as David takes his bow after 33 years

Laughter, but no tears, as Letterman takes his bow after 33 years

Veteran talkshow host steps down to plaudits from four presidents
Ivor Novello Awards 2015: Hozier wins with anti-Catholic song 'Take Me To Church' as John Whittingdale leads praise for Black Sabbath

Hozier's 'blasphemous' song takes Novello award

Singer joins Ed Sheeran and Clean Bandit in celebration of the best in British and Irish music
Tequila gold rush: The spirit has gone from a cheap shot to a multi-billion pound product

Join the tequila gold rush

The spirit has gone from a cheap shot to a multi-billion pound product
12 best statement wallpapers

12 best statement wallpapers

Make an impact and transform a room with a conversation-starting pattern
Paul Scholes column: Does David De Gea really want to leave Manchester United to fight it out for the No 1 spot at Real Madrid?

Paul Scholes column

Does David De Gea really want to leave Manchester United to fight it out for the No 1 spot at Real Madrid?