Arts and Entertainment Dominique Gonzalez-Foester's installation 'TH.2058' which opened in October 2008 at the Tate modern

Tate Modern has ensured another decade of popular large-scale installations in its Turbine Hall – which has hosted work from Ai Weiwei’s porcelain sunflower seeds to Olafur Eliasson’s giant sun – after signing its “largest and longest” sponsorship deal.

A room of my own: Fashion designer Jemima French opens the doors to her home studio

Jemima French launched her fashion line Frost French with childhood friend Sadie Frost in 1999. Since then, Kate Moss, Helena Christensen and Jerry Hall have all modelled for the label. French, who is 44, lives in Camden, north London, with her boyfriend, Francis Ridley, and her four daughters, who are aged between seven and 19. Frost French has two London shops, in Islington and Soho. For details or to shop online, visit frostfrench.com

All about Eva Hesse

A collection of the sculptor Eva Hesse's diminutive, experimental works flirts with recognisable forms. It's life, but not quite as we know it, says Tom Lubbock

Dark arts in Turbine Hall

Tate Modern's gloomy new installation reflects the spirit of the times, artist says

Beuys Is Here, De La Warr Pavilion, Bexhill, East Sussex

As memories of Beuys fade, his work comes sharply into focus

Philip Hensher: Why big isn't always beautiful

The Week In Culture

Coming Soon: The fine art of copycatting

I 've often argued the case for shutting the National Portrait Gallery down, but until someone gets around to listening to me, you might as well see this spring's overlapping Constable and Gerhard Richter shows there ( www.npg.org.uk, 5 March to 14 June and 26 February to 17 May respectively). Portraiture is not really what Constable was about, but his pictures of kith and kin and the folk of Dedham Vale are bright as brass buttons even so. Whether it's useful to think of Richter's wonderful photo-based figure paintings as portraits is a matter for debate, but they have certainly been influential on younger artists such as Glenn Brown (pictured).

Party of the Week: Snapping the snappers

Fresh from the choking press scrum sparked by Annie Leibovitz's starry presence at the National Portrait Gallery some weeks ago, the gallery's director, Sandy Nairne, emerged bright-eyed and unjaded from a cloud of party-goers at the reception party for the annual Taylor Wessing Photographic Portrait Prize.

Tate's vision of a London under fire

A futuristic shelter for besieged Londoners inspired by the July 7 bombings and the Blitz was unveiled yesterday as the latest installation to fill Tate Modern's vast Turbine Hall.

Turner Prize 2008, Tate Britain, London

A really smashing afternoon tea and a walk around the workshop are the outstanding images this year

Revealed: how Turner began his career copying the old masters

JMW Turner has gone down in history as one of the most innovative landscape painters of the 19th century. But now a blockbuster exhibition is to shed new light on a lesser known side of Turner: his obsession to prove he was just as good, if not better, than the old masters whose virtuosity he so admired.

'There's never been a great woman artist'

So says the critic Brian Sewell, and the art market seems to agree, with men's work commanding millions more at auction. By Andrew Johnson

Middle England will love my show - Tracey Emin

Tracey Emin has revealed that she deliberately set out to be provocative when she was asked by the Royal Academy to hang a gallery in its Summer Exhibition because she thought that was what was expected of her.

Cultural Life: Fyfe Dangerfield, Musician

Books
I start so many books and then get distracted. I've just read The Diving Bell and the Butterfly. It is the story of Jean-Dominique Bauby, who wrote the book by blinking the letters of the alphabet because he was paralysed everywhere else. It is strange how uplifting it is to read – it makes you appreciate the small things in life. The other book I've read is The Road by Cormac McCarthy. It is about the end of the world, and describes a journey taken by a father and son. As post-apocalyptic survivors, they wander through America. It's quite a long book but is aimless because what are they walking towards? They are walking to stay alive. Both of these books get to the root of what it means to be alive.

Maria Lassnig, Serpentine Gallery, London

All things considered, I take it you're a little upset
Latest stories from i100
Career Services

Day In a Page

Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 17 April 2015
General Election 2015: Chuka Umunna on the benefits of immigration, humility – and his leader Ed Miliband

Chuka Umunna: A virus of racism runs through Ukip

The shadow business secretary on the benefits of immigration, humility – and his leader Ed Miliband
Yemen crisis: This exotic war will soon become Europe's problem

Yemen's exotic war will soon affect Europe

Terrorism and boatloads of desperate migrants will be the outcome of the Saudi air campaign, says Patrick Cockburn
Marginal Streets project aims to document voters in the run-up to the General Election

Marginal Streets project documents voters

Independent photographers Joseph Fox and Orlando Gili are uploading two portraits of constituents to their website for each day of the campaign
Game of Thrones: Visit the real-life kingdom of Westeros to see where violent history ends and telly tourism begins

The real-life kingdom of Westeros

Is there something a little uncomfortable about Game of Thrones shooting in Northern Ireland?
How to survive a social-media mauling, by the tough women of Twitter

How to survive a Twitter mauling

Mary Beard, Caroline Criado-Perez, Louise Mensch, Bunny La Roche and Courtney Barrasford reveal how to trounce the trolls
Gallipoli centenary: At dawn, the young remember the young who perished in one of the First World War's bloodiest battles

At dawn, the young remember the young

A century ago, soldiers of the Empire – many no more than boys – spilt on to Gallipoli’s beaches. On this 100th Anzac Day, there are personal, poetic tributes to their sacrifice
Dissent is slowly building against the billions spent on presidential campaigns – even among politicians themselves

Follow the money as never before

Dissent is slowly building against the billions spent on presidential campaigns – even among politicians themselves, reports Rupert Cornwell
Samuel West interview: The actor and director on austerity, unionisation, and not mentioning his famous parents

Samuel West interview

The actor and director on austerity, unionisation, and not mentioning his famous parents
General Election 2015: Imagine if the leading political parties were fashion labels

Imagine if the leading political parties were fashion labels

Fashion editor, Alexander Fury, on what the leaders' appearances tell us about them
Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka: Home can be the unsafest place for women

Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka: Home can be the unsafest place for women

The architect of the HeForShe movement and head of UN Women on the world's failure to combat domestic violence
Public relations as 'art'? Surely not

Confessions of a former PR man

The 'art' of public relations is being celebrated by the V&A museum, triggering some happy memories for DJ Taylor
Bill Granger recipes: Our chef succumbs to his sugar cravings with super-luxurious sweet treats

Bill Granger's luxurious sweet treats

Our chef loves to stop for 30 minutes to catch up on the day's gossip, while nibbling on something sweet
London Marathon 2015: Paula Radcliffe and the mother of all goodbyes

The mother of all goodbyes

Paula Radcliffe's farewell to the London Marathon will be a family affair
Everton vs Manchester United: Steven Naismith demands 'better' if Toffees are to upset the odds against United

Steven Naismith: 'We know we must do better'

The Everton forward explains the reasons behind club's decline this season
Arsenal vs Chelsea: Praise to Arsene Wenger for having the courage of his convictions

Michael Calvin's Last Word

Praise to Wenger for having the courage of his convictions