Arts and Entertainment Dominique Gonzalez-Foester's installation 'TH.2058' which opened in October 2008 at the Tate modern

Tate Modern has ensured another decade of popular large-scale installations in its Turbine Hall – which has hosted work from Ai Weiwei’s porcelain sunflower seeds to Olafur Eliasson’s giant sun – after signing its “largest and longest” sponsorship deal.

A room of my own: Fashion designer Jemima French opens the doors to her home studio

Jemima French launched her fashion line Frost French with childhood friend Sadie Frost in 1999. Since then, Kate Moss, Helena Christensen and Jerry Hall have all modelled for the label. French, who is 44, lives in Camden, north London, with her boyfriend, Francis Ridley, and her four daughters, who are aged between seven and 19. Frost French has two London shops, in Islington and Soho. For details or to shop online, visit frostfrench.com

All about Eva Hesse

A collection of the sculptor Eva Hesse's diminutive, experimental works flirts with recognisable forms. It's life, but not quite as we know it, says Tom Lubbock

Dark arts in Turbine Hall

Tate Modern's gloomy new installation reflects the spirit of the times, artist says

Beuys Is Here, De La Warr Pavilion, Bexhill, East Sussex

As memories of Beuys fade, his work comes sharply into focus

Philip Hensher: Why big isn't always beautiful

The Week In Culture

Coming Soon: The fine art of copycatting

I 've often argued the case for shutting the National Portrait Gallery down, but until someone gets around to listening to me, you might as well see this spring's overlapping Constable and Gerhard Richter shows there ( www.npg.org.uk, 5 March to 14 June and 26 February to 17 May respectively). Portraiture is not really what Constable was about, but his pictures of kith and kin and the folk of Dedham Vale are bright as brass buttons even so. Whether it's useful to think of Richter's wonderful photo-based figure paintings as portraits is a matter for debate, but they have certainly been influential on younger artists such as Glenn Brown (pictured).

Party of the Week: Snapping the snappers

Fresh from the choking press scrum sparked by Annie Leibovitz's starry presence at the National Portrait Gallery some weeks ago, the gallery's director, Sandy Nairne, emerged bright-eyed and unjaded from a cloud of party-goers at the reception party for the annual Taylor Wessing Photographic Portrait Prize.

Tate's vision of a London under fire

A futuristic shelter for besieged Londoners inspired by the July 7 bombings and the Blitz was unveiled yesterday as the latest installation to fill Tate Modern's vast Turbine Hall.

Turner Prize 2008, Tate Britain, London

A really smashing afternoon tea and a walk around the workshop are the outstanding images this year

Revealed: how Turner began his career copying the old masters

JMW Turner has gone down in history as one of the most innovative landscape painters of the 19th century. But now a blockbuster exhibition is to shed new light on a lesser known side of Turner: his obsession to prove he was just as good, if not better, than the old masters whose virtuosity he so admired.

'There's never been a great woman artist'

So says the critic Brian Sewell, and the art market seems to agree, with men's work commanding millions more at auction. By Andrew Johnson

Middle England will love my show - Tracey Emin

Tracey Emin has revealed that she deliberately set out to be provocative when she was asked by the Royal Academy to hang a gallery in its Summer Exhibition because she thought that was what was expected of her.

Cultural Life: Fyfe Dangerfield, Musician

Books
I start so many books and then get distracted. I've just read The Diving Bell and the Butterfly. It is the story of Jean-Dominique Bauby, who wrote the book by blinking the letters of the alphabet because he was paralysed everywhere else. It is strange how uplifting it is to read – it makes you appreciate the small things in life. The other book I've read is The Road by Cormac McCarthy. It is about the end of the world, and describes a journey taken by a father and son. As post-apocalyptic survivors, they wander through America. It's quite a long book but is aimless because what are they walking towards? They are walking to stay alive. Both of these books get to the root of what it means to be alive.

Maria Lassnig, Serpentine Gallery, London

All things considered, I take it you're a little upset
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The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

Netanyahu knows he can get away with anything in America, says Robert Fisk
Families clubbing together to build their own affordable accommodation

Do It Yourself approach to securing a new house

Community land trusts marking a new trend for taking the initiative away from developers
Head of WWF UK: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

David Nussbaum: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

The head of WWF UK remains sanguine despite the Government’s failure to live up to its pledges on the environment
Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Set in a mythologised 5th-century Britain, ‘The Buried Giant’ is a strange beast
With money, corruption and drugs, this monk fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’

Money, corruption and drugs

The monk who fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’
America's first slavery museum established at Django Unchained plantation - 150 years after slavery outlawed

150 years after it was outlawed...

... America's first slavery museum is established in Louisiana
Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

The first 'American Idol' winner on how she manages to remain her own woman – Jane Austen fascination and all
Tony Oursler on exploring our uneasy relationship with technology with his new show

You won't believe your eyes

Tony Oursler's new show explores our uneasy relationship with technology. He's one of a growing number of artists with that preoccupation
Ian Herbert: Peter Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

The England coach leaves players to find solutions - which makes you wonder where he adds value, says Ian Herbert
War with Isis: Fears that the looming battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

The battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

Aid agencies prepare for vast exodus following planned Iraqi offensive against the Isis-held city, reports Patrick Cockburn
Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

The shadow Home Secretary on fighting radical Islam, protecting children, and why anyone in Labour who's thinking beyond May must 'sort themselves out'
A bad week for the Greens: Leader Natalie Bennett's 'car crash' radio interview is followed by Brighton council's failure to set a budget due to infighting

It's not easy being Green

After a bad week in which its leader had a public meltdown and its only city council couldn't agree on a budget vote, what next for the alternative party? It's over to Caroline Lucas to find out
Gorillas nearly missed: BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter

Gorillas nearly missed

BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter
Downton Abbey effect sees impoverished Italian nobles inspired to open their doors to paying guests for up to €650 a night

The Downton Abbey effect

Impoverished Italian nobles are opening their doors to paying guests, inspired by the TV drama
China's wild panda numbers have increased by 17% since 2003, new census reveals

China's wild panda numbers on the up

New census reveals 17% since 2003