Property

When the British fashion design duo Antoni & Alison bought a derelict 1820s house, they spent a year, they say, "Going, 'Agh! What do we do with it?'" They wanted to respect its history but not to the point that it resembled an English Heritage property. The result is a surprisingly beautiful blend of giant Mr Blobby ornaments and painstakingly salvaged authenticity (above). On 17 September, as part of London Fashion Week, they open it to the public (open houselondon. org.uk). I asked Antoni what he'd learnt during the restoration...

Capita signals outsourcing rebound as sales pick up

Capita flagged up a change in the outsourcing sector's fortunes yesterday, reporting a "busy sales period" only months after spooking investors with a warning on the impact of the Government's public-spending cuts.

Stonehenge pulls in £30m

Stonehenge has taken more than £30m in tourism income in the past five years.

Houses of the Holy: The historic churches that have been turned into a family home

It takes a leap of faith but for the brave, the reward at the end is a unique living space.

Leeds will have to reveal owners if promoted

If Leeds are promoted they will have to reveal who owns them; there will (probably) never be another financial collapse like Portsmouth's; and the Premier League will neither cut matches nor move to the summer schedule to create a winter break. Those were the headline revelations from yesterday's evidence session of the Department of Culture, Media and Sport Select Committee inquiry into football governance at the Houses of Parliament.

Matthew Bell: The IoS Diary (03/04/11)

Marriage of Truth and Comedy

Letters: What price a 'strong leader'?

In your Tuesday Essay, Paul Vallely drew attention to the North Korean-sounding "strong leader model" of council leadership in Bury and elsewhere. The following day, Council Leader Bob Bibby told a council meeting that as a "strong leader" he had no obligation to seek their approval for his plans. He was only inviting them to comment and vote on his "transformation strategy" because of his commitment to transparency.

From big names to fringe venues, cuts hit hundreds of arts bodies

Cultural institutions across the country have been "wiped off the map" by Arts Council England's funding cuts, announced yesterday. Regular funding to 206 arts organisations, from fringe theatres to poetry societies and renowned organisations in dance and art, has been axed.

John Walsh: We should cherish poetry, not kill it

You won't, I suspect, get many hoodied and snarling protesters attacking policemen with Molotov cocktails at the news that the Poetry Book Society has lost its Arts Council of England grant. But that doesn't stop it being a disgraceful decision by the ACE's Literature Department.

Funds slashed for hundreds of arts groups

Hundreds of theatres, galleries and other organisations are to lose some, or all, of their public funding because of Government spending cuts.

200 arts bodies nervously await funding axe

Craig Hassall, the managing director of the English National Ballet (ENB), will spend this morning at his office computer surrounded by his senior team, nervously waiting for an email.

Leading article: Our cultural fabric must be preserved

Today will be a traumatic day for Britain's arts organisations. The Arts Council, the quango that distributes state subsidies to them, will announce swingeing cuts as it passes on government reductions to its budget.

The sorcerer apprentices: A new breed of craftsmen is bring Britain's aging houses back to life

Callum Morrison, a 21-year-old carpenter from Croydon in south London, has spent his day working atop the 919-year-old roof of Lincoln Cathedral, repairing rotten rafters which have been eaten away by worms and deathwatch beetles, in a bid to preserve a piece of history. "Not many power tools here, just hard graft," he says, when he's finally able to come down off the roof and talk. "We need to replace the rafters in keeping with the original roof, to keep the rot at bay and keep the roof in working order. The last time this roof was worked on was hundreds of years ago, by someone with even fewer tools than I have now. And now I'm working on it – that's an incredible feeling."

Premier League to oppose reintroduction of standing areas

The Premier League will oppose moves to reintroduce standing areas at top-flight matches.

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A History of the First World War in 100 Moments: Peace without magnanimity - the summit in a railway siding that ended the fighting

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Scottish independence: How the Commonwealth Games could swing the vote

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Conchita Wurst becomes a 'bride' on the Paris catwalk - and proves there is life after Eurovision

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Whelks are healthy, versatile and sustainable - so why did we stop eating them in the UK?

Why did we stop eating whelks?

Whelks were the Victorian equivalent of the donor kebab and our stocks are abundant. So why do we now export them all to the Far East?
10 best women's sunglasses

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Siobhan-Marie O’Connor: Swimmer knows she needs Glasgow joy on road to Rio

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The true Gaza back-story that the Israelis aren’t telling this week

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A History of the First World War in 100 Moments: The German people demand an end to the fighting

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New play by Oscar Wilde's grandson reveals what the Irish wit said at his trials

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Can scientists save the world's sea life from

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Richard III, Trafalgar Studios, review: Martin Freeman gives highly intelligent performance

Richard III review

Martin Freeman’s psychotic monarch is big on mockery but wanting in malice