Property

When the British fashion design duo Antoni & Alison bought a derelict 1820s house, they spent a year, they say, "Going, 'Agh! What do we do with it?'" They wanted to respect its history but not to the point that it resembled an English Heritage property. The result is a surprisingly beautiful blend of giant Mr Blobby ornaments and painstakingly salvaged authenticity (above). On 17 September, as part of London Fashion Week, they open it to the public (open houselondon. org.uk). I asked Antoni what he'd learnt during the restoration...

Arts Council warns of 'severe cuts'

Arts Council-funded organisations will have an across-the-board cut of almost 7% in their grants next year, it was announced today.

Ono to unveil Lennon blue plaque at former home

John Lennon's widow Yoko Ono will today unveil a plaque commemorating his life and contribution to music.

The 50 best museums & galleries

From secret spooks at Bletchley Park to sartorial splendour at the V&A, Rhiannon Batten presents the essential guide to the nation’s finest art, hidden history and coolest culture

Main points from the Comprehensive Spending Review

Here are the main points from Chancellor George Osborne's statement on the Comprehensive Spending Review:

Even Eastwood could not save arts body

It's not every quango that has Clint Eastwood lobbying for its retention. In fact, it's only one. But the Hollywood star has failed to save the UK Film Council, whose abolition is now confirmed, along with that of a handful of other bodies funded by the Department of Culture, Media and Sport.

Betfair considers offshore move

Betfair, the soon to be floated betting exchange, has drawn up plans to move its business offshore.

Inside Lines: The axeman cometh and sport now faces the unkindest cut

With 10 days to go before the Coalition Government starts wielding the financial axe, sport is quaking in its trainers, fearing the worst. Of course, there is no reason why games and those who play them should be exempt from the coming cuts that will hit us all, even with the Olympics looming. But there are genuine concerns that while the Sports Minister, Hugh Robertson, is fighting sport's corner, his boss at the Department of Culture, Media and Sport, the lambada-dancing Jeremy Hunt, may be rather less sympathetic. The ultra-ambitious Hunt has, I hear, already ruffled feathers at Locog, the 2012 Games organising com-mittee, despite his lack of sporting nous, and the worry is that he may be more protective of the luvvies than the jocks. So alarm bells are ringing in sports organisations, not least the cash distributors UK Sport and Sport England, who face budget cuts of up to 40 per cent. Even Robertson reckons sport has to be prepared for bad news, though he promises: "It is my absolute intention to protect funding for athletes and to make sure that all sports have their plans to increase participation up and running."

Letters: Employing prisoners

Employment for prisoners

Trail of the unexpected: The M25

Leave rush hour behind for a day out on London’s mighty ring road. Simon Calder fires up the Focus

Minor British Institutions: Battersea Power Station

Only in Britain could a much-loved national monument be allowed to decay for more than two decades. And yet that has been the pitiful fate of Giles Gilbert Scott's 1935 masterpiece, Battersea Power Station. It is shameful, given that it is an integral part of the London skyline. Indeed, since the demise of the Crystal Palace in 1936, it is pretty much the symbol of south London.

Revealed: The secret deal that changed the monarchy

Sovereign's debt crisis sparked 2006 agreement surrendering ultimate financial autonomy

The monarchy: A long fight for control, and for transparency

The divine right of kings and queens to govern their own affairs has been the source of tension between Parliament and the sovereign ever since Charles I ordered soldiers into the House of Commons to arrest Oliver Cromwell and his fellow conspirators.

Forthcoming web TV service Project Canvas renamed as YouView

A new web-connected television service will be launched next year combining Freeview channels with the internet and on-demand services.

TV licence fee to be frozen for two years

The TV licence fee is to be frozen for at least a year due to the economic pressures on viewers, it was announced today.

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Day In a Page

Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence – MS Swiss Corona - seven nights from £999pp
Lake Maggiore, Orta and the Matterhorn – seven nights from £899pp
Sicily – seven nights from £939pp
Pompeii, Capri and the Bay of Naples - seven nights from £799pp
Istanbul Ephesus & Troy – six nights from £859pp
Mary Rose – two nights from £319pp
Save the tiger: The day America’s love of backyard tigers led to a horrific bloodbath

The day America’s love of backyard tigers led to a horrific bloodbath

With only six per cent of the US population of these amazing big cats held in zoos, the Zanesville incident in 2011 was inevitable
Samuel Beckett's biographer reveals secrets of the writer's time as a French Resistance spy

How Samuel Beckett became a French Resistance spy

As this year's Samuel Beckett festival opens in Enniskillen, James Knowlson, recalls how the Irish writer risked his life for liberty and narrowly escaped capture by the Gestapo
We will remember them: relatives still honour those who fought in the Great War

We will remember them

Relatives still honour those who fought in the Great War
Star Wars Episode VII is being shot on film - and now Kodak is launching a last-ditch bid to keep celluloid alive

Kodak's last-ditch bid to keep celluloid alive

Director J J Abrams and a few digital refuseniks shoot movies on film. Simon Usborne wonders what the fuss is about
Once stilted and melodramatic, Hollywood is giving acting in video games a makeover

Acting in video games gets a makeover

David Crookes meets two of the genre's most popular voices
Could our smartphones soon be diagnosing diseases via Health Kit and Google Fit?

Could smartphones soon be diagnosing diseases?

Health Kit and Google Fit have been described as "the beginning of a health revolution"
Ryanair has turned on the 'charm offensive' but can we learn to love the cut-price carrier again?

Can we learn to love Ryanair again?

Four recent travellers give their verdicts on the carrier's improved customer service
Billionaire founder of Spanx launches range of jeans that offers

Spanx launches range of jeans

The jeans come in two styles, multiple cuts and three washes and will go on sale in the UK in October
10 best over-ear headphones

Aural pleasure: 10 best over-ear headphones

Listen to your favourite tracks with this selection, offering everything from lambskin earmuffs to stainless steel
Commonwealth Games 2014: David Millar ready to serve up gold for his beloved Scotland in the end

Commonwealth Games

David Millar ready to serve up gold for his beloved Scotland in the end
UCI Mountain Bike World Cup 2014: Downhill all the way to the top for the Atherton siblings

UCI Mountain Bike World Cup

Downhill all the way to the top for the Atherton siblings
Save the tiger: The animals bred for bones on China’s tiger farms

The animals bred for bones on China’s tiger farms

The big cats kept in captivity to perform for paying audiences and then, when dead, their bodies used to fortify wine
A former custard factory, a Midlands bog and a Leeds cemetery all included in top 50 hidden spots in the UK

A former custard factory, a Midlands bog and a Leeds cemetery

Introducing the top 50 hidden spots in Britain
Ebola epidemic: Plagued by fear

Ebola epidemic: Plagued by fear

How a disease that has claimed fewer than 2,000 victims in its history has earned a place in the darkest corner of the public's imagination
Chris Pratt: From 'Parks and Recreation' to 'Guardians of the Galaxy'

From 'Parks and Recreation' to 'Guardians of the Galaxy'

He was homeless in Hawaii when he got his big break. Now the comic actor Chris Pratt is Hollywood's new favourite action star