Property

When the British fashion design duo Antoni & Alison bought a derelict 1820s house, they spent a year, they say, "Going, 'Agh! What do we do with it?'" They wanted to respect its history but not to the point that it resembled an English Heritage property. The result is a surprisingly beautiful blend of giant Mr Blobby ornaments and painstakingly salvaged authenticity (above). On 17 September, as part of London Fashion Week, they open it to the public (open houselondon. org.uk). I asked Antoni what he'd learnt during the restoration...

Arts Council warns of 'severe cuts'

Arts Council-funded organisations will have an across-the-board cut of almost 7% in their grants next year, it was announced today.

Ono to unveil Lennon blue plaque at former home

John Lennon's widow Yoko Ono will today unveil a plaque commemorating his life and contribution to music.

The 50 best museums & galleries

From secret spooks at Bletchley Park to sartorial splendour at the V&A, Rhiannon Batten presents the essential guide to the nation’s finest art, hidden history and coolest culture

Main points from the Comprehensive Spending Review

Here are the main points from Chancellor George Osborne's statement on the Comprehensive Spending Review:

Even Eastwood could not save arts body

It's not every quango that has Clint Eastwood lobbying for its retention. In fact, it's only one. But the Hollywood star has failed to save the UK Film Council, whose abolition is now confirmed, along with that of a handful of other bodies funded by the Department of Culture, Media and Sport.

Betfair considers offshore move

Betfair, the soon to be floated betting exchange, has drawn up plans to move its business offshore.

Inside Lines: The axeman cometh and sport now faces the unkindest cut

With 10 days to go before the Coalition Government starts wielding the financial axe, sport is quaking in its trainers, fearing the worst. Of course, there is no reason why games and those who play them should be exempt from the coming cuts that will hit us all, even with the Olympics looming. But there are genuine concerns that while the Sports Minister, Hugh Robertson, is fighting sport's corner, his boss at the Department of Culture, Media and Sport, the lambada-dancing Jeremy Hunt, may be rather less sympathetic. The ultra-ambitious Hunt has, I hear, already ruffled feathers at Locog, the 2012 Games organising com-mittee, despite his lack of sporting nous, and the worry is that he may be more protective of the luvvies than the jocks. So alarm bells are ringing in sports organisations, not least the cash distributors UK Sport and Sport England, who face budget cuts of up to 40 per cent. Even Robertson reckons sport has to be prepared for bad news, though he promises: "It is my absolute intention to protect funding for athletes and to make sure that all sports have their plans to increase participation up and running."

Letters: Employing prisoners

Employment for prisoners

Trail of the unexpected: The M25

Leave rush hour behind for a day out on London’s mighty ring road. Simon Calder fires up the Focus

Minor British Institutions: Battersea Power Station

Only in Britain could a much-loved national monument be allowed to decay for more than two decades. And yet that has been the pitiful fate of Giles Gilbert Scott's 1935 masterpiece, Battersea Power Station. It is shameful, given that it is an integral part of the London skyline. Indeed, since the demise of the Crystal Palace in 1936, it is pretty much the symbol of south London.

Revealed: The secret deal that changed the monarchy

Sovereign's debt crisis sparked 2006 agreement surrendering ultimate financial autonomy

The monarchy: A long fight for control, and for transparency

The divine right of kings and queens to govern their own affairs has been the source of tension between Parliament and the sovereign ever since Charles I ordered soldiers into the House of Commons to arrest Oliver Cromwell and his fellow conspirators.

Forthcoming web TV service Project Canvas renamed as YouView

A new web-connected television service will be launched next year combining Freeview channels with the internet and on-demand services.

TV licence fee to be frozen for two years

The TV licence fee is to be frozen for at least a year due to the economic pressures on viewers, it was announced today.

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Where the spooks get their coffee fix: The busiest Starbucks in the US is also the most secretive

The secret CIA Starbucks

The coffee shop is deep inside the agency's forested Virginia compound
Revealed: How the Establishment closed ranks over fallout from Loch Ness Monster 'sighting'

How the Establishment closed ranks over fallout from Nessie 'sighting'

The Natural History Museum's chief scientist was dismissed for declaring he had found the monster
One million Britons using food banks, according to Trussell Trust

One million Britons using food banks

Huge surge in number of families dependent on emergency food aid
Excavation at Italian cafe to fix rising damp unearths 2,500 years of history in 3,000 amazing objects

2,500 years of history in 3,000 amazing objects

Excavation at Italian cafe to fix rising damp unearths trove
The Hubble Space Telescope's amazing journey, 25 years on

The Hubble Space Telescope's amazing journey 25 years on

The space telescope was seen as a costly flop on its first release
Did Conservative peer Lord Ashcroft quit the House of Lords to become a non-dom?

Did Lord Ashcroft quit the House of Lords to become a non-dom?

A document seen by The Independent shows that a week after he resigned from the Lords he sold 350,000 shares in an American company - netting him $11.2m
Apple's ethnic emojis are being used to make racist comments on social media

Ethnic emojis used in racist comments

They were intended to promote harmony, but have achieved the opposite
Sir Kenneth Branagh interview: 'My bones are in the theatre'

Sir Kenneth Branagh: 'My bones are in the theatre'

The actor-turned-director’s new company will stage five plays from October – including works by Shakespeare and John Osborne
The sloth is now the face (and furry body) of three big advertising campaigns

The sloth is the face of three ad campaigns

Priya Elan discovers why slow and sleepy wins the race for brands in need of a new image
How to run a restaurant: As two newbies discovered, there's more to it than good food

How to run a restaurant

As two newbies discovered, there's more to it than good food
Record Store Day: Remembering an era when buying and selling discs were labours of love

Record Store Day: The vinyl countdown

For Lois Pryce, working in a record shop was a dream job - until the bean counters ruined it
Usher, Mary J Blige and Will.i.am to give free concert as part of the Global Poverty Project

Mary J Blige and Will.i.am to give free concert

The concert in Washington is part of the Global Citizen project, which aims to encourage young people to donate to charity
10 best tote bags

Accessorise with a stylish shopper this spring: 10 best tote bags

We find carriers with room for all your essentials (and a bit more)
Paul Scholes column: I hear Manchester City are closing on Pep Guardiola for next summer – but I'd also love to see Jürgen Klopp managing in England

Paul Scholes column

I hear Manchester City are closing on Pep Guardiola for next summer – but I'd also love to see Jürgen Klopp managing in England
Jessica Ennis-Hill: 'I just want to give it my best shot'

Jessica Ennis-Hill: 'I just want to give it my best shot'

The heptathlete has gone from the toast of the nation to being a sleep-deprived mum - but she’s ready to compete again. She just doesn't know how well she'll do...