Property

When the British fashion design duo Antoni & Alison bought a derelict 1820s house, they spent a year, they say, "Going, 'Agh! What do we do with it?'" They wanted to respect its history but not to the point that it resembled an English Heritage property. The result is a surprisingly beautiful blend of giant Mr Blobby ornaments and painstakingly salvaged authenticity (above). On 17 September, as part of London Fashion Week, they open it to the public (open houselondon. org.uk). I asked Antoni what he'd learnt during the restoration...

Corinne Bennett: Architect who made the conservation of cathedrals her speciality

In 1974 Corinne Bennett became the first woman to hold the post of architect to one of the country's cathedrals. She was appointed by that sagacious Dean, Michael Stancliffe, to Winchester, one of the most ancient and breathtakingly beautiful of all our cathedrals. She came to the position through an apprenticeship in the understanding of ancient buildings that was already discernible at her Convent School in Hove, where she was a pupil after her family came to England from Canada when she was nine. How surprised she would have been to know that she would become consultant architect to Brighton Pavilion, and to the Albert Memorial, two of the most bizarre buildings in England. The range of architectural responsibilities placed on her shoulders was breathtaking.

D-Day for Spurs' £400m stadium plans

Tottenham will discover on 30 September whether their £400m plans to redevelop White Hart Lane have the green light.

Saatchi rues lost art of conversation as gallery donation talks collapse

Charles Saatchi's pledge to donate his gallery and modern art collection to the public is in jeopardy after talks with the Arts Council broke down.

The Gleek's guide to keeping fit

Who needs aerobics when you can tone your body with high-energy dance routines from 'Glee'? Holly Williams plasters on a stage smile and gets on down

Paul Newman: Clubs on the move swap character for revenue streams

The FootbalL League column: For people to watch football, modern stadiums are far superior

Artists flinch at 'honour' of hanging in Tory offices

Culture minister Ed Vaizey says he ruffled feathers after selecting contemporary artworks to adorn Westminster

Cutting edge: radical arts funding

Britain's creative output is hugely imaginative. But when it comes to funding, the arts world is one of the most conservative industries in the country. David Lister, arts editor, argues that reducing budgets could radicalise culture

Hendrix in Britain <em>and</em> Handel's house

By all accounts iconic ‘70s rock star Jimi Hendrix and eighteenth century classical composer George Frideric Handel, are pretty dissimilar. But there is a surprising connection between the musical pair: they lived at the same address in Mayfair, London, albeit 209 years apart.

Peace, on earth: Find tranquility in English Heritage's beautiful gardens

The National Trust may well own England's most famous gardens, but English Heritage's are the most peaceful, by a mile. The first English Heritage landscape I ever went to see was at Wrest Park, halfway between the M1 and the A1 in Bedfordshire. The landscape at Wrest Park is dotted with delicate buildings, beautiful old trees, long canals and vistas; a sort of smaller version of Stowe for those who don't want to walk until their legs drop off. But particularly appealing is the fact that on a day when Stowe would be heaving with people picnicking, Wrest feels almost as if you have the place to yourself.

Simon Calder: Best to file the tourism deficit under 'lost cause'

Captain Cameron's mandarins in the Department for Culture, Media and Sport have their work cut out in persuading British travellers to holiday at home. Despite the ever-more stressful and strike-prone experience of travel by air, we have an apparently insatiable desire to leave our sceptre'd isle.

David Cameron: Cuts will net 'prize' of stronger economy

Prime Minister David Cameron today insisted there was "light at the end of the tunnel" if his Government pushed through drastic spending cuts, with the prospect of a stronger economy as a result.

Arts Quangos: A threat to our cultural life

If you abolished all quangos, the arts in Britain would pretty much cease to exist in their current form. Because governments since 1945 have conformed to the "arms length principle" by which it is deemed improper for ministers to take direct control of culture, much of the funding and basic administration of the arts has been carried out by unelected quangos.

Philip Hensher: Sorry need not be the hardest word

To apologise is to divide yourself, momentarily, in two. There is the person who has offended; and there is the person with a moral attitude, who recognises the wrong of the statement or act committed. It is not an easy act to perform, and has to be taught. Small children have to be trained to understand not just that hitting their smaller sibling was wrong, but that it is important to acknowledge that wrongness, and to state it. A person who never learns to divide themselves in this way has some fundamental incapacity.

What are we getting out of the Olympic Games?

Culture Secretary doubts if 2012 can provide legacy of encouraging Britons to take up sport &ndash; and blames Labour.

Jeremy Hunt: Faster, higher, stronger &ndash; and cheaper

The new Culture Secretary has a difficult juggling act as he tries to keep the Olympics on budget while looking for huge cuts elsewhere. Matt Chorley meets Jeremy Hunt
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Tour de France 2015: Twins Simon and Adam Yates have a mountain to climb during Tour of duty

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Forget little green men - aliens will look like humans, says Cambridge University evolution expert

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