Arts and Entertainment

This fine if elusive novel about a jazz giant echoes his art in both its style and its story-telling

Critics' Awards 1999 - Jazz: That's quite enough of looking to the past

In 1999 what had been threatening for years actually happened: the ghost of jazz past all but obliterated the present. This wasn't surprising - the cumulative weight of a music which began at the same time as the century itself had been pressing down ever since the CD reissue boom of the late 1980s - but it was the centenary of Duke Ellington that finally tipped the scales. Tribute concerts by Wynton Marsalis at the Barbican, a special weekend at the South Bank and other festschrifts too numerous to mention all honoured the Duke, but left little room for anything else.

Live: New forms

MARTIN HAYES/DENNIS CAHILL

Jazz: The great original proclaim

MARK ISHAM BARBICAN LONDON

Music: When the temperature dropped

Fifty years ago, a radical young trumpeter called Miles Davis met the experienced arranger Gil Evans. Their collaboration gave rise to The Birth of the Cool. Jazz (and life in general) has never been the same since.

Obituary: Lester Bowie

A CONTRADICTION amongst trumpet players, Lester Bowie was the most successful trumpeter of the avant-garde and at the same time the contemporary player who was most happy when digging about in the roots of jazz from the earlier parts of the century.

Jazz: Live - Imitate to innovate

MARK ISHAM RONNIE SCOTT'S LONDON

Jazz Notes: Flights from, and back to, the status quo

WITH A new chic based on old brand names, jazz by the end of the 1980s had become self-satisfied. As the end of the 1990s approaches, it has become cocooned establishment paranoia, disguised, as are many elements in our society, as tradition.

Beethoven rolls over as syllabus gets jazzed up

JAZZ GREATS including Duke Ellington, Louis Armstrong and Thelonius Monk are pushing aside Bach, Beethoven and Mozart in school music lessons.

Classical: Rhythms and rarities

OXFORD FESTIVAL OF CONTEMPORARY MUSIC

Football: The rebuilding of Blackburn has already begun

Richard Slater senses a renewed spirit pervading a stricken club

Music: Rap and the world raps with you

OK, the Beastie Boys have cleaned up their act. Got religion. Opened shops. But they'll always be a punk band at heart. By Fiona Sturges

Comment: Tinseltown's history of jazz hits a discordant note

If Hollywood wants Leonardo to be Chet Baker, I expect it will go ahead and do it

The Sitters Tale: Anita Roddick

New faces at the National Portrait Gallery: the creator of The Body Shop says that her family loves seeing her darker side uppermost - for once

Music: Notes from a quiet life

David Sylvian isn't exactly prolific: he last produced a solo album 12 years ago. But the former Japan singer is not so much a musician as a master stylist. And that takes longer.

Words: sic, adv. and v.

IF THERE are few greater pleasures in life than smiling and affixing [sic] to somebody's ineptitude, nothing is more galling than not understanding why others have done so.
Career Services

Day In a Page

Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
3.	Provence 6 nights B&B by train from £599pp
Prices correct as of 20 February 2015
War with Isis: Iraq's government fights to win back Tikrit from militants - but then what?

Baghdad fights to win back Tikrit from Isis – but then what?

Patrick Cockburn reports from Kirkuk on a conflict which sectarianism has made intractable
Syrian conflict is the world's first 'climate change war', say scientists, but it won't be the last one

Climate change key in Syrian conflict

And it will trigger more war in future
How I outwitted the Gestapo

How I outwitted the Gestapo

My life as a Jew in wartime Berlin
The nation's favourite animal revealed

The nation's favourite animal revealed

Women like cuddly creatures whilst men like creepy-crawlies
Is this the way to get young people to vote?

Getting young people to vote

From #VOTESELFISH to Bite the Ballot
Poldark star Heida Reed: 'I don't think a single bodice gets ripped'

Poldark star Heida Reed

'I don't think a single bodice gets ripped'
The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

Netanyahu knows he can get away with anything in America, says Robert Fisk
Families clubbing together to build their own affordable accommodation

Do It Yourself approach to securing a new house

Community land trusts marking a new trend for taking the initiative away from developers
Head of WWF UK: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

David Nussbaum: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

The head of WWF UK remains sanguine despite the Government’s failure to live up to its pledges on the environment
Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Set in a mythologised 5th-century Britain, ‘The Buried Giant’ is a strange beast
With money, corruption and drugs, this monk fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’

Money, corruption and drugs

The monk who fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’
America's first slavery museum established at Django Unchained plantation - 150 years after slavery outlawed

150 years after it was outlawed...

... America's first slavery museum is established in Louisiana
Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

The first 'American Idol' winner on how she manages to remain her own woman – Jane Austen fascination and all
Tony Oursler on exploring our uneasy relationship with technology with his new show

You won't believe your eyes

Tony Oursler's new show explores our uneasy relationship with technology. He's one of a growing number of artists with that preoccupation
Ian Herbert: Peter Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

The England coach leaves players to find solutions - which makes you wonder where he adds value, says Ian Herbert