Miles Davis

Album: Aethenor, En Form for Bla (VHF)

A quartet of avantly inclined souls – including Derek Bailey's drum chum Steve Noble and Stephen O'Malley, guitarist in Sunn0))) – getting into some sort of weird anti-groove live in Oslo.

Twenty-One Locks, By Laura Barton

This is what he hated about the North: this eeh-by-gumming and hotpot suppers." This North stinks of chip fat, the houses are damp, cans of pop in café refrigerators are dusty. At the hairdressers you're offered tatty, tea-stained magazines, in which all the wordsearches have already been done.

Philip Larkin - Rhythm and rhyme

A new box set of Philip Larkin's favourite jazz focuses on the pre-war trad he adored – but the poet was no musical stick-in-the- mud. In fact, says Sholto Byrnes, he was one of our most incisive jazz critics

Album: Barney Wilen and His AFRB, Dear Prof Leary (MPS)

Completely mad 1968 European free-jazz/acid rock mash-up, with French saxophonist Wilen (he played with Miles Davis) leading a double trio – one jazz, one rock – with Joachim Kuhn on keyboards and Aldo Romano on drums among the musicians.

Booker T Jones: The king of Stax picks up his axe

With his band the MGs, Booker T was the resident genius at one of America's great soul labels. Now, with a bit of help from Neil Young, he's turning off his organ and enrolling in the school of rock

Ian Carr: Trumpeter and composer whose band Nucleus was at the

A modest and gentle fellow, the trumpeter Ian Carr was surprised when, as leader of the band Nucleus in 1970, he was thrust suddenly to the crest of the American jazz-rock boom. An ingénue to fame, he reacted to his instant eminence as incredulously as William Boot had in Evelyn Waugh's Scoop.

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