Arts and Entertainment

It says a lot about how seriously people take the Grammy Awards that a video of Taylor Swift's performance of All Too Well has attracted around 180,000 views, while a 28-second clip of it complete with high kicks from Street Fighter's Ryu has already clocked over 2.2 million.

Jazz album review: Michael Garrick Sextet, Prelude To Heart Is A Locus (Gearbox)

With its satisfyingly fat vinyl platters, audiophile-friendly downloads and imaginative catalogue of rediscovered gems (plus new recordings), LP specialist Gearbox is becoming one of the wonders of the age.

Album review: Ahmad Jamal, Saturday Morning (Jazz Village)

It’s not unusual for jazz artists to have a late-career renaissance, even one that – Claude Monet-style – demands a reassessment of everything that went before.

One minute with: Lucy Worsley, historian/curator

Where are you now and what can you see?

Classical review: Roman Trekel's Wigmore recital is both riveting and perverse

Roman Trekel, Malcolm Martineau

Walton mastered the art of writing catchy but challenging material

Cedar Walton: Pianist and bandleader who played with Coltrane

The pianist, composer Cedar Walton has been known to jazz audiences for over five decades, and is likely to be remembered as an exemplar for fellow musicians, rather than a populist hero. But his association with the group of Art Blakey, and a briefer one with John Coltrane, gave him the necessary background for a successful career as a bandleader in his own right.

Album: Goldfrapp, Tales of Us (Mute)

The peculiar flip-flop trajectory of Goldfrapp’s career continues with Tales of Us, on which they eschew the electropop of 2010’s Head First in favour of a more sensuous, intimate style that owes much to Kate Bush.

Album: London Grammar, If You Wait (Metal & Dust)

London Grammar have spent  18 months preparing to be an overnight success, which care and attention pays dividends on If You Wait.

Album review: Justin Currie, Lower Reaches (Endless Shipwreck/Ignition)

Justin Currie is one of the more engaging personages in pop – his website is, hands down, the quirkiest and most articulate of any celebrity – which makes his continuing fidelity to fairly routine American musical modes somewhat frustrating.

Julia Holter: 'My mom can't play trumpet but I'd want her on it'

Fantasy band: Julia Holter

'My mom can't play trumpet but I'd want her on it'

Edinburgh International Festival Opening concert

Edinburgh 2013: Official Festival Opening concert, ALexander Nevsky, Valery Gergiev

What a thrilling start to Jonathan Mills' penultimate International festival: the RSNO in excoriating form, the Festival Chorus, with beefed-up bass section, singing in stirring Russian and clearly-enunciated Latin, all with puppetmaster Valery Gergiev pulling their strings.

Bell X1, Chop Chop (Belly Up Records)

What's surprising about this Dublin band's sixth album is that they've created a wholly original sound without resorting to samples or other electronic gadgetry.

Album review: Peter Maxwell Davies, Piano Works 1949-2009 (Prima Facie)

Though best known for his large-scale works, this anthology suggests that in his own way, Peter Maxwell Davies may be as distinctive a piano miniaturist as Erik Satie. His Orkney home is clearly the biggest influence in this regard: works such as “Three Sanday Places”, “Snow Cloud, over Lochan”, “Yesnaby Ground” and the popular “Farewell to Stromness” are simple but deeply satisfying evocations of place, weather and character. Elsewhere, “Six Secret Songs” and “Five Little Pieces for Piano” are sketches of Borgesian brevity, some condensing impressive development into a tiny frame, while others have the impromptu manner of cartoons. Considerably more complex is the engrossing seven-part “Piano Sonata”.

Album review: William Sweeney, Tree O' Licht (Delphian)

The cello is key to the music of William Sweeney, something that becomes luminously apparent in these works showcasing the skills of Robert Irvine, either solo or partnered by pianist Fali Pavri or second cellist Erkki Lahesmaa. Inspired by Gaelic psalm-singing, the title track features the two cellists' lines intertwining like a double helix: the effect resembles a lower-register "Lark Ascending", until a pungent dischord appears, prompting more disparate progressions. "Sonata for Cello and Piano" offers an intriguing combination of exploration and introspection. But "The Poet Tells of His Fame" is the standout performance, Irvine playing over pre-recorded cello samples treated to give a series of tonal washes, whines and textures.

Classical review: Prom 26 - Oliver Knussen shows brilliance as both curator and conductor

A concert curated and conducted by Oliver Knussen has as much interest as a new piece by this most reclusive and original of British composers. And Prom 26 – whose works he seems to have chosen because they reflect a fastidious control of detail equal to his own – allowed things which are not normally juxtaposed to shed fresh light on each other.

Album: Mogwai, Les Revenants (Rock Action)

Mogwai's latest album is the soundtrack to the acclaimed French supernatural drama series The Returned, and they've done a respectful job of augmenting the atmosphere of melancholy, contemplation and unease.

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Air strikes? Talk of God? Obama is following the jihadists’ script

Air strikes? Talk of God? Obama is following the jihadists’ script

The President came the nearest he has come yet to rivalling George W Bush’s gormless reaction to 9/11 , says Robert Fisk
Ebola outbreak: Billy Graham’s son declares righteous war on the virus

Billy Graham’s son declares righteous war on Ebola

A Christian charity’s efforts to save missionaries trapped in Africa by the crisis have been justifiably praised. But doubts remain about its evangelical motives
Jeremy Clarkson 'does not see a problem' with his racist language on Top Gear, says BBC

Not even Jeremy Clarkson is bigger than the BBC, says TV boss

Corporation’s head of television confirms ‘Top Gear’ host was warned about racist language
Nick Clegg the movie: Channel 4 to air Coalition drama showing Lib Dem leader's rise

Nick Clegg the movie

Channel 4 to air Coalition drama showing Lib Dem leader's rise
Philip Larkin: Misogynist, racist, miserable? Or caring, playful man who lived for others?

Philip Larkin: What will survive of him?

Larkin's reputation has taken a knocking. But a new book by James Booth argues that the poet was affectionate, witty, entertaining and kind, as hitherto unseen letters, sketches and 'selfies' reveal
Madame Tussauds has shown off its Beyoncé waxwork in Regent's Park - but why is the tourist attraction still pulling in the crowds?

Waxing lyrical

Madame Tussauds has shown off its Beyoncé waxwork in Regent's Park - but why is the tourist attraction still pulling in the crowds?
Texas forensic astronomer finally pinpoints the exact birth of impressionism

Revealed (to the minute)

The precise time when impressionism was born
From slow-roasted to sugar-cured: how to make the most of the British tomato season

Make the most of British tomatoes

The British crop is at its tastiest and most abundant. Sudi Pigott shares her favourite recipes
10 best men's skincare products

Face it: 10 best men's skincare products

Oscar Quine cleanses, tones and moisturises to find skin-savers blokes will be proud to display on the bathroom shelf
Malky Mackay allegations: Malky Mackay, Iain Moody and another grim day for English football

Mackay, Moody and another grim day for English football

The latest shocking claims do nothing to dispel the image that some in the game on these shores exist in a time warp, laments Sam Wallace
La Liga analysis: Will Barcelona's hopes go out of the window?

Will Barcelona's hopes go out of the window?

Pete Jenson starts his preview of the Spanish season, which begins on Saturday, by explaining how Fifa’s transfer ban will affect the Catalans
Middle East crisis: We know all too much about the cruelty of Isis – but all too little about who they are

We know all too much about the cruelty of Isis – but all too little about who they are

Now Obama has seen the next US reporter to be threatened with beheading, will he blink, asks Robert Fisk
Neanderthals lived alongside humans for centuries, latest study shows

Final resting place of our Neanderthal neighbours revealed

Bones dated to 40,000 years ago show species may have died out in Belgium species co-existed
Scottish independence: The new Scots who hold fate of the UK in their hands

The new Scots who hold fate of the UK in their hands

Scotland’s immigrants are as passionate about the future of their adopted nation as anyone else
Britain's ugliest buildings: Which monstrosities should be nominated for the Dead Prize?

Blight club: Britain's ugliest buildings

Following the architect Cameron Sinclair's introduction of the Dead Prize, an award for ugly buildings, John Rentoul reflects on some of the biggest blots on the UK landscape