Arts and Entertainment

It says a lot about how seriously people take the Grammy Awards that a video of Taylor Swift's performance of All Too Well has attracted around 180,000 views, while a 28-second clip of it complete with high kicks from Street Fighter's Ryu has already clocked over 2.2 million.

Album of the Week: Grown-up grooves make James Blake a key mover again

Album review: James Blake, Overgrown (Atlas)

Album of the Week: Grown-up grooves make Blake a key mover again

Igor Levit

Igor Levit, Wigmore Hall, London

Born in Russia, but rigorously trained in Germany from early childhood: a surprisingly large number of piano stars have emerged via this route, with 26-year-old Igor Levit prominent among them.

Elvis Presley backed by Stoker, left, and Hoyt Hawkins

Gordon Stoker: Singer with the Jordanaires

Gordon Stoker was the leader of the Jordanaires vocal group, who were billed alongside Elvis Presley on many of his hit records including "All Shook Up", "It's Now Or Never" and "Are You Lonesome Tonight". Elvis went as far as telling them, "Let's face it, if it hadn't been for you guys, there might not have been a me."

Album: Tyler, the Creator, Wolf (Columbia/Odd Future)

Any idea that the furore about his homophobic and misogynist lyrics might have chastened him evaporates within the first few seconds of his third album.

Sparks, Two Hands One Mouth: Live in Europe (Lil Beethoven)

Album review: Sparks, Two Hands One Mouth: Live in Europe (Lil Beethoven)

Extraordinarily, in a career 22 albums long, this is the first live recording that Sparks have released – and it's typical of their quixotic charm that, despite being famous for the ambitious complexity of their arrangements, it should feature pared-down settings of one voice accompanied by just one keyboard.

Album: Brahms/Schumann/Schumann, Sonatas and Romances – Jennifer Pike/Tom Poster (Chandos)

The violinist's interpretation of Brahms's Sonata in G presents the young composer as a hungry outsider in the marriage of Robert and Clara Schumann.

Album: Simone Dinnerstein/Tift Merritt, Night (Sony)

A genuinely odd collaboration, this, between the classical pianist Dinnerstein and the country singer-songwriter Merritt.

Valentina Lisitsa, Rachmaninov (Decca Classics)

Album review: Valentina Lisitsa, Rachmaninov (Decca Classics)

Having begun to establish herself via YouTube, Valentina Lisitsa ambitiously chose to make the four Rachmaninov Piano Concertos her musical “calling card”, to which end she and her husband remortgaged their home, hired the LSO and Abbey Road, and recorded them at their own expense.

Album: Hurts, Exile (Epic)

In which suave synth duo Theo Hutchcraft and Adam Anderson take things in a darker and heavier direction.

Classical pianist Van Cliburn dies

The renowned classical pianist and National Medal of Arts winner, Van Cliburn, has died aged 78. His publicist and friend Mary Lou Falcone said he had died at home in Fort Worth, Texas.

Album: Messaien/Saariaho, The Edge of Light - Gloria Cheng/Calder Quartet (Harmonia Mundi)

A third composer hovers, ghost-like, in pianist Cheng's beguiling recital with the Calder Quartet.

Album review: Ben Johnson, James Baillieu, Britten: The Canticles (Signum Classics)

One of the more interesting of the tide of Britten centenary tributes, The Canticles features the five vocal settings composed at various points between 1947 and 1974, in which the ostensible religious themes disguise more secular interests – the barely veiled homoeroticism of Francis Quarles' 17th-century adoration of Christ in "Canticle I", the allegorical linking of Blitz and Crucifixion in the Edith Sitwell poem used for "Canticle III" etc.

Maxim Vengerov

Maxim Vengerov, Itamar Golan, Barbican, London

Little by little Maxim Vengerov is easing himself back into the mainstream, after injury and burn-out. His last Barbican foray - with a concerto - was marred by a loss of nerve at critical moments: this time he was going for broke with a chamber recital where, if anything went wrong, he would have nowhere to hide.

Matt Bellamy of rock band Muse

Review: Muse, Shepherd’s Bush Empire, London

Stadiums and festival main stages are Muse’s typical performing spaces – in May, they embark on their biggest stadium tour yet – but at tonight’s special concert for War Child, they play to just 2,000 people.

Britten: ‘Rather a spoilt boy, and certainly a busy one’

Review: Benjamin Britten: A Life in the Twentieth Century, By Paul Kildia
Benjamin Britten: A Life for Music, By Neil Powell

There is remarkable accord between two new biographies of this prodigious composer who was, by necessity, an outsider

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Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

James Rhodes on the extraordinary legal battle to publish his memoir
Why we need a 'tranquility map' of England, according to campaigners

It's oh so quiet!

The case for a 'tranquility map' of England
'Timeless fashion': It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it

'Timeless fashion'

It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

Could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive?

Robert Fisk on the Fountainheads of World Evil in 2011 - and 2015
New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

Evolution of swimwear

From bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine