News Alan Tierney admitted selling information about Chelsea footballer John Terry's mother and Rolling Stone Ronnie Wood

A former policeman and a prison officer have admitted that they had been corrupted by Britain’s best-selling newspaper, The Sun.

It's all right - he's on the label: Question: is Rod Stewart a) a comedian, b) a Hello] photo-spread, c) a singer? Answer: a, b and c, but not necessarily in that order

IN a miniature cinema in central London, record company employees and press people gather to watch the first screening of Rod Stewart, Unplugged. Unplugged is a series made by the video channel MTV, in which top pop acts play their greatest hits without the benefit of electrical instruments. It's the first good idea to come out of a satellite television station, and many of the artists like the results so much, they release the soundtracks as albums: Paul McCartney first, then Eric Clapton, then Bruce Springsteen. And now Rod Stewart, who is here for the premiere in a white suit and a pair of glasses.

ROCK / Adulation guaranteed - 'Or-right?': Mick Jagger talked to Giles Smith about his new solo album, life with the Stones and the night Ronnie Wood went down better than ever

THE Rolling Stones' office is an elegant terraced house in Wandsworth, south London, and when Mick Jagger arrives, you can hear his voice from two flights up, booming in the stairwell. 'Or-right?' Whenever Ronnie Wood comes to this office, the assistants raid the fridge for Guinness, and Lord knows what they get out when Keith Richards visits. But when Jagger turns up, they put the kettle on. He's wearing black jeans and a sleek blue shirt, buttoned to the neck around his tiny frame. And, in a room not short of soft furnishings, he chooses a stiff chair, sits restlessly and talks cheerfully about his new album in that drawl of his, in which the vowels float apart and the words melt into one another.

Theatre thrives on 'pay what you can'

AN EXPERIMENT by a south London theatre complex, letting people pay whatever they can afford for tickets, is seeing a dramatic change in audiences.

ROCK / Settling old scores: Giles Smith watches Keith Richards close at hand in his 'secret' show at the Marquee, London

OUTSIDE the Marquee club, the queue of the ticketless stretched mournfully up the street for 30 yards. And inside, the fortunate ones were wedged to within a cubic inch of the fire and safety regulations, waiting for Keith Richards, the Rolling Stone. And then waiting a bit more. Richards was due on at 9.00. At 9.20, a muffled voice announced the concert would begin in 10 minutes. Ten minutes later, there was still half an hour to go. The person behind the tape-deck teased us with a few Rolling Stones oldies. And finally on he came, a variety of scarves and towels tied to his hair, his belt, his arms and his legs, hand swinging across the strings in the opening chords of 'Take it to Heart'.

INTERVIEW / He who pulls the strings: Keith Richards was in Paris last week, promoting his new solo album. He talked to Giles Smith about his impending summit with Bill Wyman, his rekindled relationship with Mick Jagger and the night he thumped Ronnie Wood

KEITH RICHARDS says he's trying to curb the habit now, but sometimes the temptation creeps up on him and he falls. 'Especially when you're on tour. People come out of the woodwork and somehow they're back stage and they're dangling this beautiful stuff in front of you . . .' Which is why there are some 300 different guitars in Richards' collection. They're an addiction and he can't say no.

ROCK / Wood without knots: Ron Wood gets on with everyone. Giles Smith talked to the peace envoy of rock

Ronnie Wood made his new solo album at home in County Kildare. There, the converted cowsheds provide him with not only a painting studio, a recording room and a snooker den, but also his own personal pub. 'Very essential,' he says. 'I did this album on Guinness, and I really should have been sponsored by them actually. Because on all my other solo albums, I was a little confused by the time it came to finishing them. But this album is the first one I have seen through from start to finish.'

How We Met: 49. Ronnie and Jo Wood

Ronnie Wood, 45, veteran rock'n'roller, was born in Paddington, the son of a barge worker. He was guitarist with the Faces before joining the Rolling Stones in 1975. His fifth solo album, Slide on This - his first for 10 years - comes out next month. He has a son, Jesse, by his first wife and a son and daughter by his marriage to Jo: Leah, 14 and Tyrone, nine. Jo Wood, 36, a former model, has a 17-year-old son, Jamie, by her first husband. She spends most of her time with Ronnie, either on the road with the Stones, or at their homes in Richmond and Co Kildare, Ireland.
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