Arts and Entertainment Sinéad Morrissey is the winner of the TS Eliot Prize

Winning the TS Eliot Prize is hardly a matter of life and death. But the film of that name inspired Sinéad Morrissey to pen a collection which finally secured the UK’s most prestigious poetry prize for Belfast’s first poet laureate.

Nathan Filer, 32, is a lecturer but also works in mental health

Mental health nurse Nathan Filer wins Costa first novel prize with The Shock of the Fall

Nathan Filer's novel explores a man's descent into mental illness

Women dance in the pews at St Martin-in-the-Fields church

Donald Macintyre's Sketch: Little South Africa comes to a church in London

From the courtroom, during that historic speech, you “could hear the police dogs baying outside in the square” where two lines of police were “barring the large crowds singing in support of their heroes”.

Please don't bury me in a skyscraper

An architect has brought us perilously close to a world where morgues tower upwards

Nick MacKinnon at the Forward Prizes for Poetry Awards in London’s Southbank Centre

Sexually charged poem about learning metric wins Forward Prize

Former maths teacher’s recollection of an unorthodox lesson was a ‘delight’ for judges

Page 3 Profile: Alice Oswald, poet

A poet?! You have 10 seconds before I switch off… 10, 9 –

Between the Covers 22/09/13

What's really going on in the world of books

This week's big questions: Should the West go into Syria? Has security gone too far?

This week's questions are answered by the author Philip Pullman

Seamus Heaney was influenced by Gerard Manley

Seamus Heaney: the poet who held fast to his land

A celebration of the life and work of the Nobel laureate, who died in Ireland last week

Broccoli might be good for you, but you won't catch me munching on those miniature green trees

You will look in vain for an ode to broccoli. And that is because broccoli is rubbish

Hofesh Shechter’s ‘Political Mother Derry-Londonderry Uncut’

A Bloody Sunday – but a beautiful 2013 as City of Culture Derry hosts this year's Turner Prize

Derry is this year’s City of Culture, but the nerve centre of the celebrations will forever be associated with its troubled past

Benjamin Grosvenor, BBC Symphony Orchestra, Andrew Litton, Barbican Hall, London

How often does it need to be said that a self-laudatory programme-note is a hostage to fortune? As a preamble to her new orchestral work ‘Night Ferry’, Anna Clyne pre-empted what critics might say by providing her own review.

Poets of the world, unite! Even if you can't all make the podium

The Olympics were about more than just sport. Suzi Feay looks at the 204 poems chosen from around the world to mark London 2012

Poets from all Olympic nations sought to line up at London 2012 festival

Wanted: 23 "missing" poets. Must be from Burkina Faso, Papua New Guinea, Liechtenstein or one of 20 other nations still missing from the roster of a record-breaking poetry event scheduled to form part of this summer's Olympics cultural programme.

John Walsh: App-ril is the cruellest month?

When Faber & Faber announced in June they were offering TS Eliot's The Waste Land as an iPad app, a lot of us Luddites snorted and rolled our eyes to heaven, and said, "My dear, what would poor Tom Stearns have made of this?" But we agreed that, if you really couldn't get to grips with the actual words of the Modernist masterpiece, the app certainly offered you a lot for £7.99 – recordings of the poem being read by Alec Guinness, Ted Hughes, Viggo Mortensen and TSE himself (sounding like a depressed bank manager throughout); a dramatised, intensely physical reading by Fiona Shaw; and hyperlinked commentaries from 30-odd literary chaps from Seamus Heaney to Craig Raine.

Tretower to Clyro: Essays, By Karl Miller

A new collection of essays by Karl Miller is a cause for jubilation, and this one comes with a bonus: a 31-page preface, or companion piece, by Andrew O'Hagan. O'Hagan's foreword, "The Excursions", sets the scene for much of what's in store. It describes a series of literary jaunts, undertaken in a spirit of homage and exuberance, by three friends, distinguished fellow-Celts, all endowed with the strongest instinct for allusion and assessment. ("Karl and Seamus sat on a bench and argued about the Latin on Vaughan's grave.")

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