Sigmund Freud

Jane McAdam Freud: 'How my sculpture of my father, Lucian, helped me

Lucian Freud's sculptor daughter, Jane McAdam Freud, has made a gigantic earthstone triptych sculpture of her late father's head, to help "keep him alive". Made in terracotta and measuring 3ft x 3ft x 1ft, the giant relief only came out of the kiln last week. "I can't put in words how it helped me with the grieving process," she says. "I was keeping him alive in a metaphorical sense – he was there the whole time I was making it."

Michael Fassbender: Wanted man

Romantic hero, sex addict, troubled intellectual, IRA hunger striker. He can play the lot, and more. And an astonishing run of performances has taken him from obscurity to the brink of the Oscars

Ragnarok: The End of the Gods by AS Byatt

The gods knew, Odin knew, that the time of the wolf would come." AS Byatt's statement goes to the heart of what makes Norse myth so compelling. Its gods, are not immortals, but have precisely specifiable beginnings and a prescribed, and unavoidable, ending. For all the terrors they wreak and inspire, their power is ultimately finite.

Julie Burchill: What makes a hate crime?

If you could put money on a word combo coming up empty on Google, one of the best bets would surely be "Dire Straits" and "hate crime". But apparently the Canadian Radio-Television and Telecommunications Commission has just amended a 15-year-old ruling that the Straits' "Money For Nothing" was unfit for broadcasting, due to three uses of the word "faggot".

Susan Hiller, Tate Britain, London

It has taken decades for this American artist to grow out of her wordy cleverness – and the terrifying results have been more than worth the wait

Rachel Kneebone: Lamentations, White Cube, Hoxton Square, London

It's a gloomy world that Rachel Kneebone has created at White Cube. The walls are painted in shades of grey, dark and brooding in the downstairs gallery and paler upstairs, the paint streaked in rain or tears. Kneebone makes extremely complex, delicate porcelain sculptures that teem with confusing, writhing tiny body parts arranged like urns or wreaths: a leg here, a penis or vagina there, and twisting forms that look as though they could be vines or spinal chords. Pieces of bodies in a horrific jumble. The sculptures are at times hideous visions that present bodies in states of fear, sadness and horror.

Famous names whose final stop was Golders Green crematorium

Golders Green Crematorium has been the final destination for an amazing list of the talented and famous. It is one of the best known crematoria in the world, and the oldest in London, having been opened in 1902, 17 years after cremation was legalised in Britain.

So you call yourself Jewish?

The Supreme Court's rejection of a faith school's admissions policy has revived an ancient but fierce debate in the Jewish community about what it takes to be considered 'one of us'

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