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Speeches in the House of Commons by the Tory Jacob Rees-Mogg are an erudite comedy turn. As MPs debated the European Union (Approvals) Bill (Lords), which writes into British law two draft regulations passed by the Council of the European Union, only he thought it necessary to read into the official record part of what one of the regulations actually said.

Theatre: Whoops, professor, there go my trousers

Alan Bennett's play Kafka's Dick is a `philosophical farce'. But isn't that a contradiction in terms?

The welcome return of Freud

Nobody, it seems, likes Freud - even Freudian psychoanalysts question their place in the world

Obituary: Professor Joseph Sandler

JOSEPH SANDLER was a leading figure of modern psychoanalysis and one of the most productive and creative psychoanalytic theoreticians of the past 50 years. His extraordinary clarity and scholarship has led to a reformulation of psychoanalytic ideas and was one of the major contributions to the sea change which the profession experienced after the Second World War. There have been barriers between high-quality clinically based psychoanalytic thought and rigorous thinking in university life. Sandler broke them down.

Music: Stick it to the lads

LILITH FAIR: SARAH MCLACHLAN, SINEAD O'CONNOR ROYAL ALBERT HALL LONDON

Psychological Notes: `The penis is itself a phallic symbol!'

WE ARE coming up to the centenary of the publication of The Interpretation of Dreams by Sigmund Freud. To one who has spent much of his life working with people in analysis on their dreams, Freud's magnum opus now seems very dated. He thought that dreams were repressed sexual wishes which had to be disguised and Bowdlerised so as not to shock the dreamer into wakefulness.

Why men fall for mother's lookalike

A MAN is more likely to fall in love with women who look like his mother, according to a study showing for the first time that the Oedipus complex has some scientific basis.

What Every Teenager Should Be Reading

MICHELE ROBERTS, NOVELIST AND POET:

Psychiatrist puts Jesus on the couch

A controversial study claims that Christ had an Oedipus complex, reports Clare Garner

Freudian forgetting, slips and bungles

Psychological Notes

Historical Notes: A triumph of science over religion

EXACTLY 50 years ago Alfred Charles Kinsey published an 804-page tome which smashed America with the force of a meteor. Sexual Behavior in the Human Male enraged religious leaders, university presidents and leading psychiatrists. But it also did more to promote sexual liberation in general and gay liberation in particular than any previous book.

Arts: Music: Little ado about much

CELINA GONZALEZ ROYAL FESTIVAL HALL LONDON

Freudian economics

Lucian Freud is 75 and arguably the nation's greatest living painter, yet he hasn't quite become the grand old man that this description might suggest. Far from it in fact. For all his celebrity and grandeur something about him has always been a bit close to the edge. On one hand he's a kind of national treasure, feted in high places and the only artist holder of the Order of Merit (a rare honour shared with the likes of Nelson Mandela and Yehudi Menuhin). On the other, he remains a dark and rather mysterious character aligned through his models - the late Leigh Bowery and Big Sue Tilley - to a kind of bohemian club culture. It is a curious contradiction, but one that reminds us that Freud is as much of a contemporary artist as any of the current crop of young fashionables that could be his grandchildren.

What a difference reading the whole book makes

Boyd Tonkin first review of `Mary bell'

Book review: Who's the filthiest of them all?

LILY-JOSEPHINE by Kate Saunders Century pounds 16.99

Monday's book: Pyrrhus by Mark Merlis (Fourth Estate, pounds 10.99)

Mark Merlis's first novel, American Studies, revealed an acute sensitivity to recent history in its study of the corrosive effects of McCarthyism on both national life and personal relationships. His second turns to ancient history and the exploits of Pyrrhus, son of Achilles, destroyer of Troy, and now best-known as the antagonist of Racine's Andromache. The twist is that the story is filtered through a post-Freudian, post- Stonewall consciousness and the characters endowed with all the accoutrements of 20th-century materialism. The result reads as if Hanna and Barbera had collaborated with Homer and Sophocles on a classical Greek version of The Flintstones.
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Isis profits from destruction of antiquities by selling relics to dealers - and then blowing up the buildings they come from to conceal the evidence of looting

How Isis profits from destruction of antiquities

Robert Fisk on the terrorist group's manipulation of the market to increase the price of artefacts
Labour leadership: Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea

'If we lose touch we’ll end up with two decades of the Tories'

In an exclusive interview, Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea
Tunisia fears its Arab Spring could be reversed as the new regime becomes as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor

The Arab Spring reversed

Tunisian protesters fear that a new law will whitewash corrupt businessmen and officials, but they are finding that the new regime is becoming as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor
King Arthur: Legendary figure was real and lived most of his life in Strathclyde, academic claims

Academic claims King Arthur was real - and reveals where he lived

Dr Andrew Breeze says the legendary figure did exist – but was a general, not a king
Who is Oliver Bonas and how has he captured middle-class hearts?

Who is Oliver Bonas?

It's the first high-street store to pay its staff the living wage, and it saw out the recession in style
Earth has 'lost more than half its trees' since humans first started cutting them down

Axe-wielding Man fells half the world’s trees – leaving us just 422 each

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60 years of Scalextric: Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones

60 years of Scalextric

Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones
Theme parks continue to draw in thrill-seekers despite the risks - so why are we so addicted?

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Now that Banksy has unveiled his own dystopian version, Christopher Beanland considers the ups and downs of our endless quest for amusement
Tourism in Iran: The country will soon be opening up again after years of isolation

Iran is opening up again to tourists

After years of isolation, Iran is reopening its embassies abroad. Soon, there'll be the chance for the adventurous to holiday there
10 best PS4 games

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Can’t wait for the new round of blockbusters due out this autumn? We played through last year’s offering
Transfer window: Ten things we learnt

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Record-breaking spending shows FFP restraint no longer applies
Migrant crisis: UN official Philippe Douste-Blazy reveals the harrowing sights he encountered among refugees arriving on Lampedusa

‘Can we really just turn away?’

Dead bodies, men drowning, women miscarrying – a senior UN figure on the horrors he has witnessed among migrants arriving on Lampedusa, and urges politicians not to underestimate our caring nature
Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger as Isis ravages centuries of history

Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger...

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Girl on a Plane: An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack

Girl on a Plane

An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack
Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

The author of 'The Day of the Jackal' has revealed he spied for MI6 while a foreign correspondent