Extras

Here are the answers to this week's quiz...

Straw may release Pinochet

THE GOVERNMENT last night hinted that it might free General Augusto Pinochet on "compassionate grounds" as the diplomatic row deepened over his arrest.

You ask the questions: (Such as: Twiggy, did you inhale, and if so, what? And what kind of name is that, anyway?)

Lesley Hornby, aka Twiggy, 49, was born in Neasden, north-west London. Aged 15, she was discovered by the Sixties entrepreneur Justin de Villeneuve, while working part-time in a Neasden hairdresser's. One crop and a photo-shoot later, she was declared "The Face of 1966".

Books: Raising a glass to the awkward squad

A Week in Books: Writers enjoy the odd drink on the state, but belong in opposition

`How we fought the corruption within our ranks'

NOBODY CAN accuse Tom Sawyer, when he discusses the complex relationship between the Labour Party and the Blair government, of not knowing what he is on about. It is hardly surprising that he was Tony Blair's choice four years ago to become party general secretary.

How we all fought to end Labour's political corruption

Tom Sawyer tells Donald Macintyre of a long, hard battle

Leading article: The unpopular thing is not always right

THERE MUST be no return to the Seventies: that has been the mantra of Labour Party modernisation. We can have bell-bottoms and disco, but we cannot have the National Executive of the people's party turned into a citadel occupied by those determined to accuse the Labour Government of betrayal.

Terror Bill rebellion

A BACKBENCH revolt early today by Labour MPs cast a shadow over Tony Blair's drive to bring in emergency legislation in the wake of the Omagh bombing.

Parliament: The Sketch: Grumbles of dissent rock House of common cause

IT SHOULD have all gone so smoothly. On paper, nothing could go wrong. The Criminal Justice (Terrorism and Conspiracy) Bill - so tough, so "draconian", so focus-grouped and "targeted", so ass-kicking, so likely to impress, say, a visiting American president - was going to be made law by force majeure and no one was gonna stop it.

Right of Reply: Richard Ayre

The Deputy Chief Executive of BBC News defends the Corporation against charges of recent technical problems

EDINBURGH FESTIVAL '98: David Baddiel and Rob Who?

Rob Newman has been out of the limelight since he broke up with his more famous stand-up partner. But now his profile is rising again. Interview by James Rampton

Merry-go-round threat to Speakers' Corner

THE ORGANISATION which runs Britain's royal parks has been accused of undermining the democratic tradition of Speakers' Corner by putting profit before preservation, writes Sophie Goodchild.

Politics: MPs rebel over proposals for student fees

A PACKAGE of concessions worth pounds 143m from David Blunkett last night failed to avert a revolt by Labour MPs over the Government's controversial plans to impose tuition fees and scrap maintenance grants.

Thursday's Book: The Road to Number 10: from Bonar Law to Tony Blair by Alan Watkins (Duckworth, pounds 25)

Anyone who has read Alan Watkins's political commentary will be familiar with his distinctive combination of freewheeling gossip and constitutional pedantry. This book displays the same qualities between hard covers. It offers a comprehensive account of how successive British party leaders have been chosen or emerged, from Bonar Law in 1922 to William Hague in 1997. All the plum moments of the past three-quarters of a century are here, full of juicy personalities and bitter disappointments - Curzon passed over in 1923, Butler in 1957 and 1963, Heath ousted by Mrs Thatcher in 1975, Healey defeated by Foot in 1980, Heseltine by Major in 1990. The format allows Watkins to rehearse again the high constitutional controversies - George V's questionable pressure on Ramsay Macdonald to form the National Government in 1931; Macmillan's manipulation of the Tory succession in favour of Lord Home in 1963 - as well as several murky passages of infighting in the People's Party, from Macdonald's messy emergence as leader after 1918 to Tony Blair's gazumping of Gordon Brown in 1994.

Pop music: Just good friends after the teardrop implodes

Julian Cope
News
US comedian Bill Mahr
people
Voices
Winston Churchill, then prime minister, outside No 10 in June 1943
voicesA C Benson called him 'a horrid little fellow', George Orwell would have shot him, but what a giant he seems now, says DJ Taylor
Sport
football
News
Rob Lowe
peopleRob Lowe hits out at Obama's snub of Benjamin Netanyahu
News
Davies (let) says: 'Everybody thought we were having an affair. It was never true!'
people'Our friendship flourished online. You can share some very revelatory moments at four in the morning…'
Arts and Entertainment
Over their 20 years, the band has built a community of dedicated followers the world over
music
News
Staff assemble outside the old City Road offices in London
mediaThe stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century at Britain's youngest paper
Life and Style
The Oliver twins, Philip and Andrew, at work creating the 'Dizzy' arcade-adventure games in 1988
techDocumentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry
Arts and Entertainment
Krall says: 'My hero player-singer is Elton John I used to listen to him as a child, every single record
music
News
Friends for life … some professionals think loneliness is more worrying than obesity
scienceSocial contact is good for our sense of wellbeing - but it's a myth that loneliness kills, say researchers
Career Services

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Iraq invasion 2003: The bloody warnings six wise men gave to Tony Blair as he prepared to launch poorly planned campaign

What the six wise men told Tony Blair

Months before the invasion of Iraq in 2003, experts sought to warn the PM about his plans. Here, four of them recall that day
25 years of The Independent on Sunday: The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century

25 years of The Independent on Sunday

The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century
Homeless Veterans appeal: 'Really caring is a dangerous emotion in this kind of work'

Homeless Veterans appeal

As head of The Soldiers' Charity, Martin Rutledge has to temper compassion with realism. He tells Chris Green how his Army career prepared him
Wu-Tang Clan and The Sexual Objects offer fans a chance to own the only copies of their latest albums

Smash hit go under the hammer

It's nice to pick up a new record once in a while, but the purchasers of two latest releases can go a step further - by buying the only copy
Geeks who rocked the world: Documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry

The geeks who rocked the world

A new documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry
Belle & Sebastian interview: Stuart Murdoch reveals how the band is taking a new direction

Belle & Sebastian is taking a new direction

Twenty years ago, Belle & Sebastian was a fey indie band from Glasgow. It still is – except today, as prime mover Stuart Murdoch admits, it has a global cult following, from Hollywood to South Korea
America: Land of the free, home of the political dynasty

America: Land of the free, home of the political dynasty

These days in the US things are pretty much stuck where they are, both in politics and society at large, says Rupert Cornwell
A graphic history of US civil rights – in comic book form

A graphic history of US civil rights – in comic book form

A veteran of the Fifties campaigns is inspiring a new generation of activists
Winston Churchill: the enigma of a British hero

Winston Churchill: the enigma of a British hero

A C Benson called him 'a horrid little fellow', George Orwell would have shot him, but what a giant he seems now, says DJ Taylor
Growing mussels: Precious freshwater shellfish are thriving in a unique green project

Growing mussels

Precious freshwater shellfish are thriving in a unique green project
Diana Krall: The jazz singer on being friends with Elton John, outer space and skiing in Dubai

Diana Krall interview

The jazz singer on being friends with Elton John, outer space and skiing in Dubai
Pinstriped for action: A glimpse of what the very rich man will be wearing this winter

Pinstriped for action

A glimpse of what the very rich man will be wearing this winter
Russell T Davies & Ben Cook: 'Our friendship flourished online. You can share some very revelatory moments at four in the morning…'

Russell T Davies & Ben Cook: How we met

'Our friendship flourished online. You can share some very revelatory moments at four in the morning…'
Bill Granger recipes: Our chef serves up his favourite Japanese dishes

Bill Granger's Japanese recipes

Stock up on mirin, soy and miso and you have the makings of everyday Japanese cuisine
Michael Calvin: How we need more Eric Cantonas to knock some sense into us

Michael Calvin's Last Word

How we need more Eric Cantonas to knock some sense into us