Extras

Here are the answers to this week's quiz...

Straw may release Pinochet

THE GOVERNMENT last night hinted that it might free General Augusto Pinochet on "compassionate grounds" as the diplomatic row deepened over his arrest.

You ask the questions: (Such as: Twiggy, did you inhale, and if so, what? And what kind of name is that, anyway?)

Lesley Hornby, aka Twiggy, 49, was born in Neasden, north-west London. Aged 15, she was discovered by the Sixties entrepreneur Justin de Villeneuve, while working part-time in a Neasden hairdresser's. One crop and a photo-shoot later, she was declared "The Face of 1966".

Books: Raising a glass to the awkward squad

A Week in Books: Writers enjoy the odd drink on the state, but belong in opposition

How we all fought to end Labour's political corruption

Tom Sawyer tells Donald Macintyre of a long, hard battle

`How we fought the corruption within our ranks'

NOBODY CAN accuse Tom Sawyer, when he discusses the complex relationship between the Labour Party and the Blair government, of not knowing what he is on about. It is hardly surprising that he was Tony Blair's choice four years ago to become party general secretary.

Leading article: The unpopular thing is not always right

THERE MUST be no return to the Seventies: that has been the mantra of Labour Party modernisation. We can have bell-bottoms and disco, but we cannot have the National Executive of the people's party turned into a citadel occupied by those determined to accuse the Labour Government of betrayal.

Parliament: The Sketch: Grumbles of dissent rock House of common cause

IT SHOULD have all gone so smoothly. On paper, nothing could go wrong. The Criminal Justice (Terrorism and Conspiracy) Bill - so tough, so "draconian", so focus-grouped and "targeted", so ass-kicking, so likely to impress, say, a visiting American president - was going to be made law by force majeure and no one was gonna stop it.

Terror Bill rebellion

A BACKBENCH revolt early today by Labour MPs cast a shadow over Tony Blair's drive to bring in emergency legislation in the wake of the Omagh bombing.

Right of Reply: Richard Ayre

The Deputy Chief Executive of BBC News defends the Corporation against charges of recent technical problems

EDINBURGH FESTIVAL '98: David Baddiel and Rob Who?

Rob Newman has been out of the limelight since he broke up with his more famous stand-up partner. But now his profile is rising again. Interview by James Rampton

Merry-go-round threat to Speakers' Corner

THE ORGANISATION which runs Britain's royal parks has been accused of undermining the democratic tradition of Speakers' Corner by putting profit before preservation, writes Sophie Goodchild.

Politics: MPs rebel over proposals for student fees

A PACKAGE of concessions worth pounds 143m from David Blunkett last night failed to avert a revolt by Labour MPs over the Government's controversial plans to impose tuition fees and scrap maintenance grants.

Thursday's Book: The Road to Number 10: from Bonar Law to Tony Blair by Alan Watkins (Duckworth, pounds 25)

Anyone who has read Alan Watkins's political commentary will be familiar with his distinctive combination of freewheeling gossip and constitutional pedantry. This book displays the same qualities between hard covers. It offers a comprehensive account of how successive British party leaders have been chosen or emerged, from Bonar Law in 1922 to William Hague in 1997. All the plum moments of the past three-quarters of a century are here, full of juicy personalities and bitter disappointments - Curzon passed over in 1923, Butler in 1957 and 1963, Heath ousted by Mrs Thatcher in 1975, Healey defeated by Foot in 1980, Heseltine by Major in 1990. The format allows Watkins to rehearse again the high constitutional controversies - George V's questionable pressure on Ramsay Macdonald to form the National Government in 1931; Macmillan's manipulation of the Tory succession in favour of Lord Home in 1963 - as well as several murky passages of infighting in the People's Party, from Macdonald's messy emergence as leader after 1918 to Tony Blair's gazumping of Gordon Brown in 1994.

Pop music: Just good friends after the teardrop implodes

Julian Cope
Voices
On the last day of campaigning before the polling booths open, the SNP leader has written to voters in a final attempt to convince them to vote for independence
scotland decidesIs a huge gamble on oil keeping First Minister up at night?
Arts and Entertainment
Rosalind Buckland, the inspiration for Cider with Rosie died this week
booksBut what is it like to be the person who inspires a classic work of art?
Life and Style
techApple has just launched its latest mobile operating software – so what should you do first?
News
A male driver reverses his Vauxhall Astra from a tow truck
newsThe 'extremely dangerous' attempt to avoid being impounded has been heavily criticised
Arts and Entertainment
Lionel Messi in action for Barcelona
filmSo what makes the little man tick?
Arts and Entertainment
tvReview: An undercooked end (spoiler alert)
News
i100
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Mystery of the Ground Zero wedding photo

A shot in the dark

Mystery of the wedding photo from Ground Zero
His life, the universe and everything

His life, the universe and everything

New biography sheds light on comic genius of Douglas Adams
Save us from small screen superheroes

Save us from small screen superheroes

Shows like Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D are little more than marketing tools
Reach for the skies

Reach for the skies

From pools to football pitches, rooftop living is looking up
These are the 12 best hotel spas in the UK

12 best hotel spas in the UK

Some hotels go all out on facilities; others stand out for the sheer quality of treatments
These Iranian-controlled Shia militias used to specialise in killing American soldiers. Now they are fighting Isis, backed up by US airstrikes

Widespread fear of Isis is producing strange bedfellows

Iranian-controlled Shia militias that used to kill American soldiers are now fighting Isis, helped by US airstrikes
Topshop goes part Athena poster, part last spring Prada

Topshop goes part Athena poster, part last spring Prada

Shoppers don't come to Topshop for the unique
How to make a Lego masterpiece

How to make a Lego masterpiece

Toy breaks out of the nursery and heads for the gallery
Meet the ‘Endies’ – city dwellers who are too poor to have fun

Meet the ‘Endies’ – city dwellers who are too poor to have fun

Urbanites are cursed with an acronym pointing to Employed but No Disposable Income or Savings
Paisley’s decision to make peace with IRA enemies might remind the Arabs of Sadat

Ian Paisley’s decision to make peace with his IRA enemies

His Save Ulster from Sodomy campaign would surely have been supported by many a Sunni imam
'She was a singer, a superstar, an addict, but to me, her mother, she is simply Amy'

'She was a singer, a superstar, an addict, but to me, her mother, she is simply Amy'

Exclusive extract from Janis Winehouse's poignant new memoir
Is this the role to win Cumberbatch an Oscar?

Is this the role to win Cumberbatch an Oscar?

The Imitation Game, film review
England and Roy Hodgson take a joint step towards redemption in Basel

England and Hodgson take a joint step towards redemption

Welbeck double puts England on the road to Euro 2016
Relatives fight over Vivian Maier’s rare photos

Relatives fight over Vivian Maier’s rare photos

Pictures removed from public view as courts decide ownership
‘Fashion has to be fun. It’s a big business, not a cure for cancer’

‘Fashion has to be fun. It’s a big business, not a cure for cancer’

Donatella Versace at New York Fashion Week