Arts and Entertainment Dai & The Ramblers, Duw Duw

Duw Duw, Just Peachy Records

Album: Killer Shrimp, Whatever Sincerely (33 Jazz)

Saxophonist Ed Jones and trumpeter Damon Brown are talented UK bop players who've been round the block a few times and Killer Shrimp is their attempt to use technology to sound more contemporary.

This is the weekend for...Gathering wild mushrooms

As long as you know what you're doing, and take a good identification guide with you, there are few things more delicious than your own apricot-coloured chanterelles, brown-capped penny buns or ceps, trumpet-like horns of plenty or creamy white field mushrooms.

Simon Carr: With a warm-up act of the living dead, George could hardly go wrong

Sketch: His chinwork is more developed. His face a little broader but even more bloodless

Album: Eric Clapton, Clapton (Reprise)

Eric Clapton's last couple of albums have been collaborations, with J J Cale and Steve Winwood respectively, and it's fair to say that the success of Clapton derives in part from the extension of that collaborative spirit into the solo arena.

Prom 66: Berlin Philharmonic / Rattle, Royal Albert Hall, London

The Mahler had come the night before – this second Berlin Philharmonic Prom imaginatively chronicled the before and after.

Prom 62: Gustav Mahler Jugendorchester/ Blomstedt, Royal Albert Hall

Like the Matthias Grünewald paintings that inspired it, Paul Hindemith’s Symphony “Mathis der Maler” sounds somehow, and quite miraculously, to be illuminated from within.

Uefa ban vuvuzelas from European matches

Vuvuzelas have been kicked out of European competition after UEFA said that the plastic trumpets drowned out supporters and detracted from the emotion of the game.

Album: Miles Davis, Bitches Brew Legacy Edition (Sony Legacy)

Miles had already broached the matter on In A Silent Way, but this was a far more unruly beast, with John McLaughlin's steely guitar lines cutting across the miasmic electric piano lines of Joe Zawinul and Chick Corea, and Miles's trumpet sharing stagefront duties with the sax of wingman Wayne Shorter, the whole thing driven by a massive drum including Jack DeJohnette and Billy Cobham.

Harry Beckett: Highly respected trumpeter who worked with Mingus, Scott, Dankworth and Tracey

One of the most eloquent and inventive of our jazz players, the trumpeter and flugelhorn player Harry Beckett didn't get the recognition he deserved. Because he was a quiet and gentle person, he remained a sideman and not primarily a bandleader. He was unique in that his lyrical and romantic style allowed him to play adventurous and even free-form jazz and still to communicate lucidly with his audience. He was also at home with reggae and electronic jazz.

Ain't no city like New Orleans

Music is helping to revive the fortunes of this town five years after Hurricane Katrina. Richard Holledge reports

My Secret Life: Herb Alpert, musician, 75

My parents were ... pretty brave. My father was born in Russia. He came to New York alone, on a ship, around 1916, escaping the nasty things going on there. He couldn't speak a word of English, but little by little he built himself up. He met my mother, became a tailor, and over the years brought his entire family over to America to join him.

Album: Mark Charig, Pipedream (Ogun)

First time on CD for this 1977 free-jazz album recorded in a Bristol church.

Album: Decoy & Joe McPhee, OTO (Bo'Weavil)

This stonking live recording features Hammond-organ trio Decoy in company with cult US saxophonist McPhee, whose wildly energetic squawks make it hard to believe he's over 70.

Album: Solus 3, The Sky Above the Roof (Solus 3)

They don't come any more uncategorisable than this.

Johnny Parker: Versatile pianist who helped the Humphrey Lyttelton band move away from their staid New Orleans sound

Recording at the Parlophone studio in April 1956, Humphrey Lyttelton found himself with time to spare at the end of the session. He decided to fill it by improvising a medium-fast piano and trumpet blues with the band's pianist Johnny Parker. This casual performance become known as "Bad Penny Blues" and Lyttelton recalled that, in an unlikely journey, "it climbed to No 18 in the Hit Parade and then fell back exhausted." But Parker's rolling blues had not escaped Paul McCartney, and the piano part of "Bad Penny Blues" provided some inspiration for the Beatles' "Lady Madonna".

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