Column One; The day they came to bury Barney Rubble

"BOEM! SLOPEN" read the banner Rogier Gerritzen had carried all the way from southern Holland to the Wembley Conference Centre in north London. "Slopen," he explained, "means demolish, destroy. And boem, well, that means boom."

The Knack: How to Wear a Wig

IF IT'S too groomed, it gives the game away. Men often make the mistake of trying to get the piece too perfect; if you really want it to look natural it's better to ruffle it up and not be too smooth. I see a lot of awful, badly fitting wigs as I walk down the street; people have no idea of how natural it can be. Men especially, wanting a bald patch covered, go into a department store where a piece is handed to them in a box and told "that will fit you, sir", and they just put the thing on.

Exam girl has to cover dyed hair with wig

A HEADMASTER has defended his decision to order a schoolgirl to wear a wig during GCSE examinations because she had dyed her hair bright red.

Parliament: Justice Bill - Barristers' wigs face the cut in court reforms

THE ABOLITION of wigs in court and the end of the pre- eminent status of Queen's Counsel came into prospect yesterday when a Labour MP secured government agreement to introduce a series of amendments to the Access to Justice Bill.

LETTER: Blonde bombshell

LETTER:

Arts: How Handel got his groove back

Composers' reputations rise and fall, but few have enjoyed such a boom as that of George Frideric Handel. Audiences now flock to operas thought unstageable 20 years ago.

Is it worth it... Wigs

If you want flowing locks like Gwyneth this summer but don't want the hassle of hair extensions, a wig could be the answer. Despite being given a bad name by Elton John over the years (his latest weave-in faring no better), wigs have become an accepted part of fashion culture.

Essay: On the reconstruction site

It's one thing to imagine the past, quite another to see it on TV. But what if there is no archive footage?

Fashion: The history of the wig: On a wig and a prayer

The wigs worn today - associated with positions of power or fancy dress- but the art of wig-making dates back to Egyptian times. They were made from human hair or sheep's wool and consisted of a bulky mass of plaits or braids. Men had shaved heads under their wigs and women wore their hair short. In Roman times, wigs were worn by women as a fashionable accessory. Since blond hair was in vogue then, expensive wigs were made from blond hair obtained from the conquered people in the north.

pounds 2.5m drive to halt smoking

A HARD-HITTING anti-smoking campaign featuring a mother who has since died from her habit will be launched today to persuade younger people to give up smoking.

Theatre: Into the swing with five-star Cinders

Theatre CINDERELLA THEATRE ROYAL STRATFORD EAST LONDON

Peers let Irvine drop regalia

THE LORD Chancellor succeeded yesterday in his wish to abandon his 17th-century ceremonial costume of tights, breeches, buckled shoes and wig in favour of more comfortable clothes.

Tradition: Irvine to swap his ceremonial robes for 'comfortable' attire

THE LORD Chancellor, Lord Irvine of Lairg, succeeded yesterday in his wish to abandon his 17th-century ceremonial costume of tights, breeches, buckled shoes and wig in favour of more comfortable clothes.

Jewish insults cause a storm

THE RUSSIAN capital has been wrapped up for days in a storm over anti-Semitic remarks made at a rally by General Albert Makashov, an extremist on the far left of the Communist Party. The failure of the party to condemn him with sufficient vigour prompted Boris Berezovsky, an influential politician and tycoon of Jewish origin, to demand that the Communists be outlawed.

The Sketch: Funny handshakes and funnier wigs on the agenda

THE LORD CHANCELLOR has made plain for some time that he would dearly like to "in" himself. As the only member of the Cabinet who is actually required to drag up for a day at work, complete with tights, full-length wig and a fetching pair of Emma Hope buckle shoes, he has been feeling increasingly uncomfortable of late, a man forced to subdue his bodily urges to the stifling conventions of a more strait-laced time.
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Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

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