Column One; The day they came to bury Barney Rubble

"BOEM! SLOPEN" read the banner Rogier Gerritzen had carried all the way from southern Holland to the Wembley Conference Centre in north London. "Slopen," he explained, "means demolish, destroy. And boem, well, that means boom."

The Knack: How to Wear a Wig

IF IT'S too groomed, it gives the game away. Men often make the mistake of trying to get the piece too perfect; if you really want it to look natural it's better to ruffle it up and not be too smooth. I see a lot of awful, badly fitting wigs as I walk down the street; people have no idea of how natural it can be. Men especially, wanting a bald patch covered, go into a department store where a piece is handed to them in a box and told "that will fit you, sir", and they just put the thing on.

Exam girl has to cover dyed hair with wig

A HEADMASTER has defended his decision to order a schoolgirl to wear a wig during GCSE examinations because she had dyed her hair bright red.

Parliament: Justice Bill - Barristers' wigs face the cut in court reforms

THE ABOLITION of wigs in court and the end of the pre- eminent status of Queen's Counsel came into prospect yesterday when a Labour MP secured government agreement to introduce a series of amendments to the Access to Justice Bill.

LETTER: Blonde bombshell

LETTER:

Arts: How Handel got his groove back

Composers' reputations rise and fall, but few have enjoyed such a boom as that of George Frideric Handel. Audiences now flock to operas thought unstageable 20 years ago.

Is it worth it... Wigs

If you want flowing locks like Gwyneth this summer but don't want the hassle of hair extensions, a wig could be the answer. Despite being given a bad name by Elton John over the years (his latest weave-in faring no better), wigs have become an accepted part of fashion culture.

Essay: On the reconstruction site

It's one thing to imagine the past, quite another to see it on TV. But what if there is no archive footage?

Fashion: The history of the wig: On a wig and a prayer

The wigs worn today - associated with positions of power or fancy dress- but the art of wig-making dates back to Egyptian times. They were made from human hair or sheep's wool and consisted of a bulky mass of plaits or braids. Men had shaved heads under their wigs and women wore their hair short. In Roman times, wigs were worn by women as a fashionable accessory. Since blond hair was in vogue then, expensive wigs were made from blond hair obtained from the conquered people in the north.

pounds 2.5m drive to halt smoking

A HARD-HITTING anti-smoking campaign featuring a mother who has since died from her habit will be launched today to persuade younger people to give up smoking.

Theatre: Into the swing with five-star Cinders

Theatre CINDERELLA THEATRE ROYAL STRATFORD EAST LONDON

Peers let Irvine drop regalia

THE LORD Chancellor succeeded yesterday in his wish to abandon his 17th-century ceremonial costume of tights, breeches, buckled shoes and wig in favour of more comfortable clothes.

Tradition: Irvine to swap his ceremonial robes for 'comfortable' attire

THE LORD Chancellor, Lord Irvine of Lairg, succeeded yesterday in his wish to abandon his 17th-century ceremonial costume of tights, breeches, buckled shoes and wig in favour of more comfortable clothes.

Jewish insults cause a storm

THE RUSSIAN capital has been wrapped up for days in a storm over anti-Semitic remarks made at a rally by General Albert Makashov, an extremist on the far left of the Communist Party. The failure of the party to condemn him with sufficient vigour prompted Boris Berezovsky, an influential politician and tycoon of Jewish origin, to demand that the Communists be outlawed.

The Sketch: Funny handshakes and funnier wigs on the agenda

THE LORD CHANCELLOR has made plain for some time that he would dearly like to "in" himself. As the only member of the Cabinet who is actually required to drag up for a day at work, complete with tights, full-length wig and a fetching pair of Emma Hope buckle shoes, he has been feeling increasingly uncomfortable of late, a man forced to subdue his bodily urges to the stifling conventions of a more strait-laced time.
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The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

Netanyahu knows he can get away with anything in America, says Robert Fisk
Families clubbing together to build their own affordable accommodation

Do It Yourself approach to securing a new house

Community land trusts marking a new trend for taking the initiative away from developers
Head of WWF UK: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

David Nussbaum: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

The head of WWF UK remains sanguine despite the Government’s failure to live up to its pledges on the environment
Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Set in a mythologised 5th-century Britain, ‘The Buried Giant’ is a strange beast
With money, corruption and drugs, this monk fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’

Money, corruption and drugs

The monk who fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’
America's first slavery museum established at Django Unchained plantation - 150 years after slavery outlawed

150 years after it was outlawed...

... America's first slavery museum is established in Louisiana
Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

The first 'American Idol' winner on how she manages to remain her own woman – Jane Austen fascination and all
Tony Oursler on exploring our uneasy relationship with technology with his new show

You won't believe your eyes

Tony Oursler's new show explores our uneasy relationship with technology. He's one of a growing number of artists with that preoccupation
Ian Herbert: Peter Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

The England coach leaves players to find solutions - which makes you wonder where he adds value, says Ian Herbert
War with Isis: Fears that the looming battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

The battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

Aid agencies prepare for vast exodus following planned Iraqi offensive against the Isis-held city, reports Patrick Cockburn
Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

The shadow Home Secretary on fighting radical Islam, protecting children, and why anyone in Labour who's thinking beyond May must 'sort themselves out'
A bad week for the Greens: Leader Natalie Bennett's 'car crash' radio interview is followed by Brighton council's failure to set a budget due to infighting

It's not easy being Green

After a bad week in which its leader had a public meltdown and its only city council couldn't agree on a budget vote, what next for the alternative party? It's over to Caroline Lucas to find out
Gorillas nearly missed: BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter

Gorillas nearly missed

BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter
Downton Abbey effect sees impoverished Italian nobles inspired to open their doors to paying guests for up to €650 a night

The Downton Abbey effect

Impoverished Italian nobles are opening their doors to paying guests, inspired by the TV drama
China's wild panda numbers have increased by 17% since 2003, new census reveals

China's wild panda numbers on the up

New census reveals 17% since 2003