Charles Pétillon transforms everyday scenes using balloons in art-installation series Invasions

The 42-year-old says he uses the balloons to "shift our point of view from a practical perception to an aesthetic experience that provokes questions"

Gillian Orr
Thursday 09 April 2015 02:29
Comments
'PlayStation 1' was shot in a small town close to Dunkirk in the north of France and riffs on the concept of the games console
'PlayStation 1' was shot in a small town close to Dunkirk in the north of France and riffs on the concept of the games console

Invading golf courses, spilling out of houses, overflowing from rusty cars, the white balloons in Charles Pétillon's art-installation series "Invasions" become ghostly occupants of the diverse spaces they appear in.

"I try to tackle subjects we encounter daily without paying them any attention," says the artist. "Those subjects might be anything from architecture to consumables to philosophy. Using the balloons, I try to shift our point of view from a practical perception to an aesthetic experience that provokes questions."

The 42-year-old, who divides his time between Paris and Lille, requires the help of a small team to construct the creations. The balloons are inflated then manipulated into grape-like structures and stored in a hangar before being transported by lorry to their destination.

The structure in "Mutations 2", shot in a forest not far from Lille, amplifies the molecular structure of DNA as a metaphor for our changing world (Charles Pétillon)

"PlayStation 1" (pictured top), shot in September 2011 in a small town close to Dunkirk in the north of France, riffs on the concept of the games console. "The name was chosen to evoke the developing implementation of play areas in towns," says Pétillon. "The point is to question the use of games in all forms, their evolution and their influence on society."

The structure in "Mutations 2" (above), shot last June in a forest not far from Lille, amplifies the molecular structure of DNA as a metaphor for our changing world. "By placing the structure in a place where it is deprived of sense, I can reinforce the discrepancies of the changes we are living through. It is impossible to imagine that such an idyllic, picturesque and enchanting place could bear the stigma, or result, of such changes."

For more: charlespetillon.com

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Please enter a valid email
Please enter a valid email
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Please enter your first name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
Please enter your last name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
You must be over 18 years old to register
You must be over 18 years old to register
Opt-out-policy
You can opt-out at any time by signing in to your account to manage your preferences. Each email has a link to unsubscribe.

By clicking ‘Create my account’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged inPlease refresh your browser to be logged in