Harry Potter author JK Rowling to be made Companion of Honour at Buckingham Palace

Special award held by only 65 people at any one time

Scott d'Arcy
Tuesday 12 December 2017 12:46
Comments
The writer was awarded an OBE in 2001
The writer was awarded an OBE in 2001

Harry Potter author JK Rowling will bring a touch of magic to Buckingham Palace as she is made a Companion of Honour.

Rowling, who is also marking two decades since the publication of the first book in her best-selling series, has been honoured for services to literature and philanthropy.

The 52-year-old will be decorated with the rare title, befitting of one of her fantastical characters, in addition to her OBE, which she was awarded in 2001.

Membership of the Order of the Companions of Honour, established in 1917 by George V, is a special award held by only 65 people at any one time, and recognises services of national importance.

Rowling, whose first name is Joanne, has previously told how her famous boy wizard creation simply “fell” into her head years earlier while on a crowded train to London after a weekend flat-hunting with her then boyfriend in Manchester in 1990.

Sitting on the delayed train, she said she had “never been so excited about an idea before”.

Harry Potter was born, and on her return home that night, Rowling immediately began writing what would become the first book of the series - Harry Potter And The Philosopher's Stone.

A prolific Twitter user with more than 10 million followers, she uses it to promote her charities, including Lumos, and also to speak out against Brexit and the US President, Donald Trump.

Others collecting different honours include composer and conductor Sir George Benjamin, for services to music.

He began composing music at the age of seven and made his debut at the BBC Proms at 20, going on to be professor of composition at King's College London from 2001.

Brian Noble, the former Bradford Bulls and Great Britain coach, will pick up his MBE for services to rugby league and charity.

Rosemary Johnson, a former Welsh National Opera violinist who was paralysed in a car accident, will collect an MBE for services to music after using brain waves to perform again.

Press Association

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Please enter a valid email
Please enter a valid email
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Please enter your first name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
Please enter your last name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
You must be over 18 years old to register
You must be over 18 years old to register
Opt-out-policy
You can opt-out at any time by signing in to your account to manage your preferences. Each email has a link to unsubscribe.

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged in