The Girl On The Train: Hit thriller by Paula Hawkins tops list of most-borrowed library books

Public Lending Right released the figures which revealed the top 10 most-borrowed books, as well as the top 10 most-borrowed authors

Roisin O'Connor
Saturday 04 February 2017 12:31
Comments

Paula Hawkins' best-selling novel The Girl On The Train was the most-borrowed library book in 2015/2016, it has been revealed.

The thriller was borrowed 72,827 times between July 2015 and July 2016 - or around 200 times per day.

The book has sold 15 million copies around the world and been turned into a major film starring Emily Blunt.

Emily Blunt in the film adaptation of The Girl On The Train

The most borrowed books from UK libraries, 2015/16, were as follows:

1. The Girl on the Train - Paula Hawkins

2. Personal - Lee Child

3. Make Me - Lee Child

4. Diary of a Wimpy Kid - Jeff Kinney

5. Diary of a Wimpy Kid: The Long Haul - Jeff Kinney

6. Alert - James Patterson

7. Go Set A Watchman - Harper Lee

8. Diary of a Wimpy Kid: Cabin Fever - Jeff Kinney

9. Awful Auntie - David Walliams

10.Truth or Die - James Patterson

Hawkins told the BBC: "As a voracious reader possessed of a fevered imagination, my childhood visits to the library were a thrill.

"I credit those weekly trips with making me the reader - and the writer - I became, so I could not be more delighted to discover that The Girl on the Train was the most borrowed book from UK libraries last year."

The Girl On The Train was hailed as "the new Gone Girl", and was the biggest adult fiction title, selling 1.1 million copies for £5.3m.

Published by Black Swan, it became a word-of-mouth sensation which placed its author, a former financial journalist, in a spot on Forbes' yearly ranking of the richest writers in the world.

Hawkins does not appear among the top 10 most borrowed authors, however.

US writer James Patterson was number one on that list for the 10th year in a row thanks to his hit crime novels, followed by children's authors Julia Donaldson, Daisy Meadows, Roderick Hunt and Francesca Simon.

The most borrowed authors from UK libraries, 2015/16

1. James Patterson

2. Julia Donaldson

3. Daisy Meadows

4. Roderick Hunt

5. Francesca Simon

6. MC Beaton

7. Adam Blade

8. Jacqueline Wilson

9. Roald Dahl

10. Nora Roberts

The figures come from Public Lending Right, which distributes royalties to authors whose books are borrowed: they get 7.8p each time, and are paid a maximum of £6,600.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Please enter a valid email
Please enter a valid email
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Please enter your first name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
Please enter your last name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
You must be over 18 years old to register
You must be over 18 years old to register
Opt-out-policy
You can opt-out at any time by signing in to your account to manage your preferences. Each email has a link to unsubscribe.

By clicking ‘Create my account’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged inPlease refresh your browser to be logged in