Photography book review: Printmaking in Paris, By Fleur Roos Rosa de Carvalho and Marije Vellekoop

 

Saturday 17 August 2013 17:11
Comments

In the years between 1890 and 1905, Paris witnessed a revolution in printmaking. Before this time, prints had primarily served reproductive or political ends, but, as the century came to a close, artistic quality became paramount, and printmaking blossomed into an autonomous art form.

This book looks at the circumstances in which this terrific new enthusiasm for prints unfolded; the principal players in its development; and the various printmaking techniques being used. Most modern French artists experimented with lithographs, etchings, or woodcuts. Colourful prints were seen and admired all over Paris in the form of theatre programmes, sheet music, magazines, books and street posters. Featuring highlights from the Van Gogh Museum, this volume shows how the most influential artists of the day turned their hands to making beautiful "impressions" – prints that were works of art in themselves.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged inPlease refresh your browser to be logged in