Army of the Dead viewers ‘raging’ over camera pixel error in zombie Netflix film

‘I’m amazed Zack Snyder didn’t notice,’ one person wrote

Jacob Stolworthy
Thursday 27 May 2021 11:22
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Army of the Dead trailer

Netflix users have found another reason to complain about Army of the Dead.

Those who decided to invest time into the lengthy zombie heist thriller couldn’t help but notice certain scenes featured dead pixels on their TV screen.

The pixels became such an issue that many viewers were left wondering if their television sets were malfunctioning. However, the sheer amount of people who were complaining about the issue on Twitter and Reddit, revealed that the pixels were probably due to a ‘faulty sensor” on a camera used by Snyder.

Viewers spotted up to three pixels in scenes as early as one featuring Dave Bautista’s character, Scott Ward, discussing the heist with the billionaire Bly Tanaka (Hiroyuki Sanada) and another featuring safecracker Ludwig Dieter (Matthias Schweighofer).

One Netflix said they were “raging” over the camera fault.

“It is not visible in every scene, as only one of the (I estimate three) cameras has a faulty sensor.” one Reddit user wrote, adding: “For example, you can clearly see it in Dave Bautista’s reverse shot when he sits down in the diner at the beginning of the movie.”

Another person questioned how the pixels had not been removed in post-production, stating: “I’m amazed Zack didn’t notice.”

Despite the technical snafu, reviews of the film have been largely positive, with the majority of critics awarding the film three stars.

Matthias Schweighofer and Dave Bautista in ‘Army of the Dead’

The Independent’s Clarisse Loughrey wrote: “This is Dawn of the Dead meetsOcean’s Eleven,” adding that it creates a brand new cocktail of familiar beats”.

There is a theory doing the rounds, which is making people want to re-watch the film. It suggests that the characters are trapped in an infinite time loop.

Army of the Dead is available to stream on Netflix now.

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