A Very English Scandal star Ben Whishaw confirms return to James Bond franchise

The voice of Paddington Bear is expecting to reprise the role of Q

Jacob Stolworthy
Monday 21 May 2018 10:08
Comments
A Very English Scandal trailer 2018

The next James Bond film may still feel a long way off but details are slowly trickling in - and now one more cast member is seemingly confirmed to return alongside for what is expected to be Daniel Craig's final stand as the British spy.

Ahead of his appearance in BBC One series A Very English Scandal, Ben Whishaw revealed he is strongly expecting to reprise the role of Q for the 25th entry into the long-running 007 series.

“I believe I'm contracted to be in it. That's as much as I know,” he told The Hollywood Reporter.

Whishaw, who is also known as the voice of Paddington Bear, praised Trainspotting filmmaker Danny Boyle who is strongly expected to be replacing Sam Mendes as franchise director.

“I was thrilled when I read that he was going to be doing it. I can't think of a better, more exciting director for Daniel for the way that he's taken the character. I think it'll be really exciting to work with him. I've been such a big fan.”

In the same interview, Whishsaw stated he's unsure whether there'll be a third entry into the hugely profitable Paddington franchise despite audience demand.

“It’s a tremendous amount of work that goes into those films, so I’m not sure if it will happen," he said. "Or, if it does, I’m not sure when it will happen.”

Q has appeared in 21 Bond films to date. He is the head of the Secret Service's research and development division and has been played in the past by Desmond Llewelyn and John Cleese.

Three-part miniseries A Very English Scandal is a dramatisation of the Jeremy Thorpe drama in which the 1970s MP - played by Hugh Grant -was tried and acquitted of attempting to murder his former lover, Norman Scott (Whishsaw).

it was revealed earlier this year that Craig will receive the largest pay cheque for his 007 return than any other actor will for a single film over the next few years.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged inPlease refresh your browser to be logged in