Groundhog Day: Sky is celebrating Pennsylvania holiday in very repetitive fashion

Prepare for a lot of Bill Murray

Jacob Stolworthy
Wednesday 02 February 2022 15:05 GMT
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Groundhog Day - trailer

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It comes the same day every year, and it always catches us off guard.

No, not Groundhog Day, the traditional Pennsylvania holiday lived over and over by Bill Murray in the 1993 comedy of the same name, but Sky’s celebration of the occasion.

As has become the norm, Sky’s television schedulers have sensed an opportunity and are broadcasting the film a grand total of 11 times in a row.

If you’re a die-hard Groundhog Day fan, you would have been able to watch the film from 6:15am – that’s when the first showing began – and can do so right through until 11.45pm this evening.

The scheduling was pointed out by TV journalist Scott Bryan, who wrote: “Yep. Sky Comedy have done it again. and again. and again. and again.”

The cult comedy, directed by Harold Ramis, follows Murray’s weatherman who is caught in a time loop, doomed to relive the same day over until he gets it right.

Stephen Tobolowsky as Ned Ryerson in ‘Groundhog Day’
Stephen Tobolowsky as Ned Ryerson in ‘Groundhog Day’ (Columbia/Kobal/Shutterstock)

It comes the same day every year, and it always catches us off guard.

No, not Groundhog Day, the traditional Pennsylvania holiday lived over and over by Bill Murray in the 1993 comedy of the same name, but Sky’s celebration of the occasion.

As has become the norm, the television schedulers have sensed an opportunity and are broadcasting the film a grand total of 13 times in a row.

If you’re a die-hard Groundhog Day fan, you would have been able to watch the film from 6:15am – that’s when the first showing began – and can do so right through until 11.45pm this evening.

But be prepared to remain awake for quite some time; the final airing is due to finish a whole 24 hours later.

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The scheduling was pointed out by TV journalist Scott Bryan, who wrote: “Yep. Sky Comedy have done it again. and again. and again. and again.”

The cult comedy, directed by Harold Ramis, follows Murray’s weatherman who is caught in a time loop, doomed to relive the same day over until he gets it right.

Stephen Tobolowsky as Ned Ryerson in ‘Groundhog Day’
Stephen Tobolowsky as Ned Ryerson in ‘Groundhog Day’ (Columbia/Kobal/Shutterstock)

It comes the same day every year, and it always catches us off guard.

No, not Groundhog Day, the traditional Pennsylvania holiday lived over and over by Bill Murray in the 1993 comedy of the same name, but Sky’s celebration of the occasion.

As has become the norm, the television schedulers have sensed an opportunity and are broadcasting the film a grand total of 13 times in a row.

If you’re a die-hard Groundhog Day fan, you would have been able to watch the film from 6:15am – that’s when the first showing began – and can do so right through until 11.45pm this evening.

But be prepared to remain awake for quite some time; the final airing is due to finish a whole 24 hours later.

The scheduling was pointed out by TV journalist Scott Bryan, who wrote: “Yep. Sky Comedy have done it again. and again. and again. and again.”

The cult comedy, directed by Harold Ramis, follows Murray’s weatherman who is caught in a time loop, doomed to relive the same day over until he gets it right.

Stephen Tobolowsky as Ned Ryerson in ‘Groundhog Day’
Stephen Tobolowsky as Ned Ryerson in ‘Groundhog Day’ (Columbia/Kobal/Shutterstock)

It comes the same day every year, and it always catches us off guard.

No, not Groundhog Day, the traditional Pennsylvania holiday lived over and over by Bill Murray in the 1993 comedy of the same name, but Sky’s celebration of the occasion.

As has become the norm, the television schedulers have sensed an opportunity and are broadcasting the film a grand total of 13 times in a row.

If you’re a die-hard Groundhog Day fan, you would have been able to watch the film from 6:15am – that’s when the first showing began – and can do so right through until 11.45pm this evening.

But be prepared to remain awake for quite some time; the final airing is due to finish a whole 24 hours later.

The scheduling was pointed out by TV journalist Scott Bryan, who wrote: “Yep. Sky Comedy have done it again. and again. and again. and again.”

The cult comedy, directed by Harold Ramis, follows Murray’s weatherman who is caught in a time loop, doomed to relive the same day over until he gets it right.

Stephen Tobolowsky as Ned Ryerson in ‘Groundhog Day’
Stephen Tobolowsky as Ned Ryerson in ‘Groundhog Day’ (Columbia/Kobal/Shutterstock)

It comes the same day every year, and it always catches us off guard.

No, not Groundhog Day, the traditional Pennsylvania holiday lived over and over by Bill Murray in the 1993 comedy of the same name, but Sky’s celebration of the occasion.

As has become the norm, the television schedulers have sensed an opportunity and are broadcasting the film a grand total of 13 times in a row.

If you’re a die-hard Groundhog Day fan, you would have been able to watch the film from 6:15am – that’s when the first showing began – and can do so right through until 11.45pm this evening.

But be prepared to remain awake for quite some time; the final airing is due to finish a whole 24 hours later.

The scheduling was pointed out by TV journalist Scott Bryan, who wrote: “Yep. Sky Comedy have done it again. and again. and again. and again.”

The cult comedy, directed by Harold Ramis, follows Murray’s weatherman who is caught in a time loop, doomed to relive the same day over until he gets it right.

Stephen Tobolowsky as Ned Ryerson in ‘Groundhog Day’
Stephen Tobolowsky as Ned Ryerson in ‘Groundhog Day’ (Columbia/Kobal/Shutterstock)

It comes the same day every year, and it always catches us off guard.

No, not Groundhog Day, the traditional Pennsylvania holiday lived over and over by Bill Murray in the 1993 comedy of the same name, but Sky’s celebration of the occasion.

As has become the norm, the television schedulers have sensed an opportunity and are broadcasting the film a grand total of 13 times in a row.

If you’re a die-hard Groundhog Day fan, you would have been able to watch the film from 6:15am – that’s when the first showing began – and can do so right through until 11.45pm this evening.

But be prepared to remain awake for quite some time; the final airing is due to finish a whole 24 hours later.

The scheduling was pointed out by TV journalist Scott Bryan, who wrote: “Yep. Sky Comedy have done it again. and again. and again. and again.”

The cult comedy, directed by Harold Ramis, follows Murray’s weatherman who is caught in a time loop, doomed to relive the same day over until he gets it right.

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