Is Batman's Bane the Bain of Romney's existence? No, and here's why

 

Tim Walker
Friday 20 July 2012 11:05
Comments
<b>BANE:</b>
<br />Steroidal comic book and film villain, born in a Caribbean prison. Sustained by a mysterious toxin that means death to punier humans.
<p><b>BAIN:</b>
<br />Steroidal asset management and financial services villain, born in Boston. Susta
BANE:
Steroidal comic book and film villain, born in a Caribbean prison. Sustained by a mysterious toxin that means death to punier humans.

BAIN:
Steroidal asset management and financial services villain, born in Boston. Susta

Rush Limbaugh, America's most influential right-wing radio host, waded into the critical controversy surrounding The Dark Knight Rises this week, when he suggested to his listeners that the film's villain, Bane, might be a derisory reference to Mitt Romney, Republican presidential contender, and founder of the homophonic Bain Capital. "The movie has been in the works for a long time," Limbaugh spluttered, "the release date's been known, summer 2012 for a long time. Do you think that it is accidental, that the name of the really vicious, fire-breathing, four-eyed whatever-it-is villain in this movie is named Bain?"

The answer, of course, is yes: it is completely accidental. The character of Bane was first created in 1993, at which time Romney was working for Bain in virtual obscurity, while his rival Obama was an associate at a law firm specialising in civil rights. Chuck Dixon, the comics artist who co-created Batman's musclebound, hyper-intelligent nemesis, says that he and his creative partner Graham Nolan are lifelong "staunch conservatives". Moreover, the film's narrative [SPOILER ALERT] fails to bear out Limbaugh's theory: Bane is the revolutionary leader of a gang which targets and terrorises Gotham's richest citizens, and destroys the city's Stock Exchange, thus potentially impoverishing archetypal one-percenter Bruce Wayne.

Indeed, as Limbaugh clarified on air the following day, Wayne and his caped crusader alter-ego are – like many superheroes – radical conservative icons. Wealthy, elitist, interested in philanthropy but passionate about law and order. "The rich, wealthy hero in the Batman movie is more like Romney," he explained, and "the Bane guy seems more like an Occupy Wall Street guy."

Know your enemy: Bane vs Bain

Bane

Steroidal comic book and film villain, born in a Caribbean prison. Sustained by a mysterious toxin that means death to punier humans.

Bain

Steroidal asset management and financial services villain, born in Boston. Sustained by a mysterious investment model that means death to punier firms.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Please enter a valid email
Please enter a valid email
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Must be at least 6 characters, include an upper and lower case character and a number
Please enter your first name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
Please enter your last name
Special characters aren’t allowed
Please enter a name between 1 and 40 characters
You must be over 18 years old to register
You must be over 18 years old to register
Opt-out-policy
You can opt-out at any time by signing in to your account to manage your preferences. Each email has a link to unsubscribe.

By clicking ‘Create my account’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Register for free to continue reading

Registration is a free and easy way to support our truly independent journalism

By registering, you will also enjoy limited access to Premium articles, exclusive newsletters, commenting, and virtual events with our leading journalists

Already have an account? sign in

By clicking ‘Register’ you confirm that your data has been entered correctly and you have read and agree to our Terms of use, Cookie policy and Privacy notice.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy policy and Terms of service apply.

Join our new commenting forum

Join thought-provoking conversations, follow other Independent readers and see their replies

Comments

Thank you for registering

Please refresh the page or navigate to another page on the site to be automatically logged inPlease refresh your browser to be logged in