Jurassic World and Terminator: Genisys directors attack film studios for dropping huge spoilers in trailers

Colin Trevorrow and Alan Taylor are unimpressed at how much is revealed

Jess Denham
Tuesday 07 July 2015 21:06
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Jurassic World director Colin Trevorrow claims trailers are ruining films for cinema-goers
Jurassic World director Colin Trevorrow claims trailers are ruining films for cinema-goers

Directors of two of this summer's biggest blockbusters have strongly criticised studios for giving too much away in the trailers.

Colin Trevorrow, whose Jurassic World became the fastest film to gross £1 billion last month, was unimpressed at the "bananas" decision to reveal a scene in which Chris Pratt rides a motorbike through a pack of velociraptors.

"My opinion? I think they've shown far more of this movie than I would have ever wanted," he told IGN. "I was emailing the guys today, can I just have the credits? Can you at least not spoil the credits?"

Trevorrow argued that snippets taken out of context can prove challenging for an audience as the "suspension of belief has to be earned". He also disapproved of the presentation of Jurassic World as a "shoot-em-up" when in fact, it cannot be neatly pigeonholed into a genre and contains relatively few explosions.

"This kind of marketing has historically been able to get a lot of people in theatres," he said. "I trust that a lot of people who have seen the movie will call their friends and say 'actually, it's not like that at all, it's more like Jurassic Park."

Trevorrow is joined in his views by Terminator: Genisys director Alan Taylor, who previously helmed Thor: The Dark World.

Taylor said recently that he had "a few unpleasant conversations" with the studio over how it chose to market the movie after it showed scenes that filmmakers had been trying to keep secret in its latest trailer (we won't spoil them here, but you can watch the clip below).

"I directed those scenes with the intention that no one would know," he told Uproxx. "One of my favourite moments - and I think Jason Clarke did a great job with it - is when he walks into the hospital in 2017 and everything from there until the turn, you're supposed to think, 'Oh man this is great'.

"I think [the marketing team] felt like they had to send a strong message to a very wary audience that there was something new, that this was going to new territory. They were concerned people were misperceiving this as kind of a reboot and none of us wanted to reboot two perfect movies by James Cameron."

Trailers aside, Terminator: Genisys has received a lukewarm reception from critics and is expected to flop compared to other movies in the franchise.

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