Mission: Impossible 7 leaves onlookers in awe after plunging a train into a quarry for latest stunt

Tom Cruise was spotted flying a helicopter to set

Annabel Nugent
Monday 23 August 2021 08:43
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Mission: Impossible most impressive stunts

A scene involving a train crashing off of a cliff and plunging into a quarry has been filmed for a forthcoming Mission: Impossible film.

The impressive feat was shot at Stoney Middleton, Derbyshire on Friday (20 August). It is the latest stunt to be filmed for Mission: Impossible 7.

Local photographers and onlookers captured the moment and shared it on social media. Many also reported that the film’s star Tom Cruise was on set to witness the crash.

Local photographer Villager Jim shared a post on social media: “Waited 5 months for this shot… of the train in the new Mission Impossible movie going off the cliff!! Tom was there too, Amazing day!!!”

The photographer also told the BBC that he had spotted Cruise flying himself to the set in a helicopter.

After a production hiatus due to the pandemic, filming resumed on the film in September 2020. Reports of construction at Darlton Quarry first emerged in April.

As reported by the BBC, the locomotive was driven through the village on a lorry earlier in the week before it was situated on a short section of a specially built track.

Last year, fans spotted Cruise perched on the roof of a speeding train in Norway as part of a stunt for Mission: Impossible 7.

Cruise has a reputation for performing his own stunts, and the Mission: Impossible franchise has seen the actor engage in a number of death-defying sequences.

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Fallout saw Cruise become the first actor in history to complete a daring “Halo jump” skydive, and the star also suffered a nasty injury while jumping across rooftops.

Mission: Impossible 7 – which additionally stars Simon Pegg, Ving Rhames and Vanessa Kirby – is scheduled for release in May 2022.

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