Roy Dotrice dead: Actor who played Leopold Mozart in the Oscar-winning film Amadeus dies aged 94

The actor died at his London home surrounded by family

Jack Shepherd
Monday 16 October 2017 11:23
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Roy Dotrice, best known for playing Leopold Mozart in the Oscar-winning film Amadeus, has died aged 94.

A statement from the actor's family says he died Monday, 16 October, at his London home surrounded by family, including his three daughters, grandchildren, and great-grandson.

Dotrice was an award-winning actor, taking home the Tony award for best actor in 2000 for his performance in the A Moon for the Misbegotten revival.

The actor first came to the public's attention playing a leading character in the BBC's 1971 adaptation of A.P. Herbert's Misleading Cases. A few years later, Dotrice played Charles Dickens in the miniseries Dickens of London.

Dotrice also played various sci-fi roles, appearing in Space: 1999 and the Buffy the Vampire spin-off Angel.

Game of Thrones fans will also recognise Dotrice's voice, the actor having recorded audiobooks for each of George R. R. Martin A Song of Ice and Fire novels.

Dotrice was originally meant to play Grand Maester Pycelle, yet withdrew from the part for medical reasons, Julian Glover eventually taking the role.

The actor was married to fellow actress Kay Newman, the pair having three daughters, one of whom, Karen Dotrice, played Jane Banks in Disney's Mary Poppins.

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