Star Wars: The Force Awakens fan theory presents interesting possible Kylo Ren twist

Is this Star Wars villain hiding a secret?

Clarisse Loughrey
Monday 21 December 2015 10:37
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A fan theory has proposed that Kylo Ren is actually a double agent within the First Order.

*CAUTION: MAJOR SPOILERS AHEAD*

Reddit user vrso3g has offered up an alternate origins theory for The Force Awakens' conflicted villain, Kylo Ren. Knowing that Ren's path is a conscious emulation of Darth Vader's: his reverence towards the helmet, the line, "I will finish what you started"; the question remains, doesn't Kylo Ren know that Darth Vader/Anakin found redemption? That he rejected the dark side in his final moments before death? 

Indeed, it seems fair to assume Ren heard the story as he was being trained by Luke; so this user asks, "shouldn't he see Vader as weak, like he sees his former self or Han?"

Their answer? Ren's "a double agent of sorts". Believing Luke was too soft to take Supreme Leader Snoke head on, Ren purposely joined the Dark Side to get close enough to Snoke to take him out himself, and so was aware Snoke's only interest was in manipulating him. The words, "I will finish what you started", then reference bringing balance to the Force through Snoke's death. 

Ren could have foolishly believed he was strong enough to resist the Dark Side, but is now corrupted by it. Killing his own father could then be interpreted either as a mark of his full corruption, or as a deliberate move to gain Snoke's trust as Sith initiation involves committing an unforgivable act. Indeed, it's after the death of Solo that Snoke calls Ren back to complete his training. 

An interesting theory, certainly; taking the narrative in a different direction to what most fans have assumed will be a standard redemption story on Ren's part, whether or not that may be achieved before an untimely death. However, it's a response to issues that shouldn't necessarily arise from The Force Awakens, and does fairly undermine a large chunk of what makes Ren's character so fascinating.

In short, it assumes Kylo Ren is a logical person. Which, for someone whose console-smashing temper tantrums are so common that Stormtroopers already know to just slowly back off from the situation, gives him perhaps a little too much credit. There's very little logic in Ren's actions at any point throughout the film; he's a man clearly driven by spite, rage, and fear. Things which all boil into a panic when he's finally forced to confront the strength of Rey's power. 

Even if Ren was aware Anakin eventually found redemption, that would only provide added fuel in his determination to commit himself to the Dark Side and avenge his grandfather's supposed moment of weakness. And who knows how Snoke manipulated Vader's past in order to win over a young man who evidently resented his parents, felt like an outsider, and so would naturally look to his family's ultimate misfit. A man searching for purpose in all the wrong places isn't going to fuss over details.

Star Wars: The Force Awakens is in theatres now.

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