The real hero of Jurassic World is this dad rescuing his margaritas from pterodactyls

This extra gave zero f*cks about genetically-modified killer dinosaurs

Christopher Hooton
Monday 13 July 2015 11:59
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There are a few unintentionally hilarious elements to Jurassic World – Chris Pratt's Indiana Jones-lite costume, the misting of Dallas Bryce Howard's chest before every scene, Jake Johnson's character's sole purpose being to press one button in the final act – but none more so than this extra's curious priorities.

The moment comes during the pterodactyl attack scene, when the flying dinosaurs descend on visitors after escaping their aviary.

It's pretty brutal, with men, women and children being snatched away by their heads, and the pterodactyls are probably responsible for the majority of the human death toll in the movie. This guy isn't too worried though:

Here he is again in slow motion:

We don't know for certain that the character is a dad, but I'm betting yes purely because of the cap, slacks and pastel holiday shirt.

His parental status will hopefully be addressed in a very necessary spin-off movie, where we'll also learn about his insatiable thirst of margaritas that won't stop even when being stalked by several hundred genetically-modified dinosaurs.

The character was actually played by none other than Jimmy Buffett, the owner of Margaritaville.

He got the cameo due to his being a good friend of producer Frank Marshall, with his chain even getting some product placement in the movie, though his inclusion wasn't apparent to 99% of viewers and came across pretty bizarre.

The character has become so popular, people have been dressing up as him at this year's Comic Con.

Forget smouldering Chris Pratt, here's to you Jurassic World dad, sipping tequila in the lobby-turned-crisis room reading Golfing World while others get their tetanus shots.

@christophhooton

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