21 Savage arrest: Atlanta rapper to fight against deportation from US, says lawyer

His lawyer says the arrest is 'based upon incorrect information about prior criminal charges'

Rapper 21 Savage arrested in US due to being UK citizen

A lawyer for 21 Savage has responded to the rapper’s arrest by US immigrant agents who claim he is living in the country illegally.

The 26-year-old, real name Shayaa Bin Abraham-Joseph, allegedly came to America in July 2005 aged 12 on a visa. According to a birth certificate obtained by news outlets, the artist was born in Newham, east London on 22 October 1992.

The US Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) has said the Grammy-nominated musician lives in the country “unlawfully” after legally his visa expires. They also claim he is a convicted felon.

Attorney Charles Kuck responded to ICE’s claims on Monday (4 February) with a statement, saying the arrest was ”based upon incorrect information about prior criminal charges” and arguing the rapper has never attempted to conceal his immigration status from authorities.

Abraham-Joseph applied for a U Visa in 2017, awarded to non-citizen’s who are victims of crime. In 2013, four years previously, the rapper was shot six times on his 21st birthday. The attack took the life of his best friend.

Kuck went on to say his client is ”not a flight risk” and a “prominent member of the music industry” who would have been recognised, should he have attempted to flee.

“ICE has not charged Mr Abraham-Joseph with any crime,” he continued.

“As a minor, his family overstayed their work visas, and he, like almost two million other children, was left without legal status through no fault of his own.”

Kuck also accused ICE officials of attempting to “unnecessarily punish him and try to intimidate him into giving up his right to fight to remain in the United States”.

He concluded that Abraham-Joseph was “clearly not a danger to the community” and is “the type of immigrant we want in America”.

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Abraham-Joseph was in ICE custody in Georgia this week while awaiting a federal immigration judge to determine future actions.

After news of his detainment broke, a spokesman for the British Foreign Office said: “Our staff are in contact with the lawyer of a British man following his detention in the US.”

Dina LaPolt, the rapper’s lawyer, said over the weekend that his legal team is “working diligently” to free him from detention while they “work with the authorities to clear up any misunderstandings”.

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